October 1998 Weekly Firesides

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group 
Week ending 4 October 1998 

Hello again all you Civil War Researchers.... Well I'm sitting here just thinking to myself, how neat it is 
to be "talking" to the "Faithful" again. Needless to say, I've got a CD on tonight and just soaking up the 
sounds from "Jim Brickman" the pianist. :-) Hmmmmm I'm beginning to put a schedule of events 
back together so don't forget to check the schedule at the end of the "Fireside"....

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU :-)..... 
COME AGAIN, WE RELISH YOUR COMPANY.... 

The continuing series in the newsletter, is on the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, 
or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers........ So many of you have been astonished 
that those records are available through the FHCs, that we thought this would be of worth in your 
research.... 

This upcoming Thursday is Letters, Songs, and Poems, our favorite night of the month. So come and 
join us for a neat experience..... 

************************************************************************************* 

THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. Meeting Logs are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters". 
************************************************************************************* 
U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers............................. 

The next stage of series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records 
available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

Specific Union Sources........................... 

Union Army soldiers may have served in the U.S. Army, local militia units mustered into federal service, 
or volunteer regiments raised by the individual states. The length of service varied from 90 days to three 
years. Many soldiers also re-enlisted serving in more than one regiment. The Union Army and Navy 
enlisted over 2.3 million men, of which nearly 359,000 died in combat or from wounds and disease. 

Union Service Records 

Service Records of Soldiers. - There is currently no master index to the names of soldiers who served in 
Union volunteer regiments. Note from the editor: A Union Soldiers Roster is in the making by Broadfoot 
Publishing, but it's incomplete. Individual indexes to state volunteer regiments are available on microfilm 
for every Northern state and every Southern state except South Carolina. Most service records have not 
been microfilmed and are available only at the National Archives. The following service records and 
indexes are available on microfilm at the National Archives and Family History Library........ 

...........states continued. 

Below are listed the service records of former Confederates or "galvanized Yankees" who enlisted from 
prison camps are:

Compiled Service Records of Former Confederate Soldiers Who Served in the First through Sixth U.S. 
volunteer Infantry Regiments, 1864-66. National Archives Microfilm Publication M1017. (FHL films 
1,315,687-751; FSLC computer number 122843.) T find specific microfilm numbers with the Family 
History Library Catalog on microfiche, search the Locality section under UNITED STATES - MILITARY 
RECORDS.

Copies of complied service records can be requested from the National Archives by using NATF Form 80. 
These were made from muster roll, pay lists, hospital records, and record books that have not been filmed. 
They are found in Record Group 94, Records of the Adjutant General's Office. 1780's - 1917. some of 
these sources, such as the hospital registers, often give detailed information, such as birthplace. If a 
compiled service record notes a "Bookmark File" number, this refers to a separate set of records that must be asked for specifically when requesting copies.

Service Records of Sailors. For records of sailors who served in the Union Navy, contact the National 
Archives. The weekly returns of enlistments, 1855 to 1891, are the records of most value for sailors, 
particularly those who served between 1855 and 1865. They have not been filmed and are available only 
at the National Archives in Record Group 24, Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel. Entries list the 
sailor's name, enlistment date, birthplace, age, occupation, personal description, data of or return of 
enlistment, and record of precious naval service.

An index to sailors who enlisted between 1861 and 1865 is listed below:

Index to Rendezvous Reports, Civil War, 1861-1865. National Archives Microfilm Publication T1099. 
(FHL films 1,570,558-88; FHLC computer number 462166.).

.........................to be continued... 
************************************************************************************ 
From: FI WATROUS

Military Records Thought to Have Been Lost - 
Duplicates Found!!

The Veteran's Administration has discovered some 10 million duplicates of
20th century military records thought to have been destroyed in their
1973 fire. If you have been told the records you need were burned in that
fire, you may want to write again:

National Personnel Records
GSA, 9700 Page Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63132

Advise them -- Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marines -- and they will send
you forms to obtain all copies of your active duty records.

From: "Disabled American Veterans Bulletin", newsletter March/April
1998.
{{Ike}} GREAT Find........
************************************************************************************ 
A Note from GFS Jayne to the "Faithful":

To all the members of the American Civil War History Chatroom: 
I just want to thank all of you for being so supportive while Jim was
away. Your letters and notes re the Weekly Fireside were gratefully
received.
Your kinds words were certainly appreciated. I need to especially thank
IllinoisCW for allowing me to share his poems with you and also for being
"available" to answer all my questions. To the "faithful", I thank you
for your assistance and moral support. To GFS MOM, GFS Tracy and GFS Mead...
thank you ladies for all you did to help. AND last but not least.... to
my partner.... I'm so glad you're back... {{{{{ }}}}}

Jayne
************************************************************************************ 
ATTENTION to ALL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
There is a new "Military Families Chat on Wed nights at 7 in Ancestral Digs with GFS Beri
and GFH JimmA... Drop by and learn even more in this chosen field of ours......

*********************************************************************************** 
DID YOU KNOW?? ................................... 
Excerpts taken from "Best Little Stories from the Civil War" by C. Brian Kelly..... 

At his inauguration on a cloudy but mild March 4, Lincoln doffed his black silk hat prior to 
deliverying his inaugural address and... - hesitated. Where to put it? Two men reached for it. One was a 
young reporter named Henry Watterson, who in just a few weeks would be a Confederate soldier and later 
a journalist for Southern newspapers and often on the run from Mr. Abe Lincoln's Yankee troops. The 
other reaching for the hat, and more successfully, was the senator from Illinois, and Lincoln's own rival 
and debating opponent of considerable fame, Mr. Stephen Douglas. Douglas, a Democrat, had been 
defeated by Lincoln in the presidential race of 1860 (although, it is true, the rebellious Southern 
Democrats had been represented in the same husting by Vice President John C. Breckinridge of 
Kentucky).
Not yet sworn in, Lincoln said in his inaugural speech that while he had no intention of 
interfering with "the institution of slavery," he also felt, "No state, on its own mere action, can get out of 
the Union." He waxed a bit poetic and was obviously appealing for goodwill on all sides when he said to 
a nation not yet one century old (the American Revolution only about eighty years earlier): "The mysitc 
chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield, and patriot grave, to every living heart and 
hearthstone, all over this broad land will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely 
they will be, by the better angels of our nature." More bluntly, he warned: "In your hands, my dissatisfied 
fellow countrymen, and not in mine, is the momentous issue of civil war. The government will not assail 
you. You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors. You have no oath registered in 
Heaven to destroy the government, while I have the most solemn one to 'preserve, protect and defend' it."
And so the immediate issue was not slavery but seccession. Or, as Lincoln saw it, the Union, the 
Union, the Union. He was sworn in after his speech, incidentally, by Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, the 
jurist famous for his majority opinion in the Dred Scott case, which declared a slave was not a citizen with 
the right to sue in a Federal court. Taney was from Maryland, a Democrat, and a former slave-owner 
himself.
Lincoln had spent the night at Willard's Hotel, and he rode to the Capitol in an open carriage, 
accompanied by outgoing Democratic President James Buchanan. Security was tight, and almost 
everybody knew war was imminent. Just that morning Buchanan had received word that Major Robert 
Anderson, commander of the garrison trapped on the island of Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, could 
not hold out against the forces arrayed against him unless he was reinforced by twenty thousand men. 
That word was passed along to Lincoln even before he rose to speak on the wooden platform erected for 
his inauguration at the East Portico of the Capitol. Begun around one o'clock, the inaugural speech took 
about thirty minutes, during which time, it is reported, Senator Douglas held Lincoln's hat for him.

************************************************************************************
Subj: CW Diaries
From: rosewebb@datasync.com (Rose C. Webb)
Subject: 
Location of Civil War Diaries of Southern Women
Date: 
Sat, 19 Sep 1998 06:32:25 -0400
From: 
Linda Haas Davenport <lhaasdav@AVANA.NET>

It's been a long while since I posted this info. My home page below
contains a list of Diaries written by southern women during the Civil
War. And, wouldn't you know it, not a single one of them is mine. Drop by
and see if you can find someone that belongs to you <g>

Linda
lhaasdav@avana.net

Home Page: http://www.avana.net/~lhaasdav/Haas.html
County Coordinator: Marion Co AR http://www.rootsweb.com/~armarion

{{{{{{Rosie}}}}}} Even while you're "layed up", you still find the time to send us info. God bless you "Sis". For those of you who are unaware, our Information "GIANT", Rosie Webb is pretty seriously ill. She's home now, but still pretty sick... So I'm spreading the word, so you can be keeping her in your thoughts and prayers......... "We Love Ya Rosie"; a thorough and speedy return to good health..........
************************************************************************************
A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................ 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................ 

************************************************************************************
Subj: Virginia City Cemetery
From: MaryARoots

Dear Governor Miller,

I recently visited the State of Nevada, touring some of its Historical sites. It was not my first visit, but this 
time I was doing some genealogy research on my ancestor, who was a gold miner in Virginia City in 
1860. Part of my research led me to the cemetery in that city. 

I'm writing to you in the hopes that something can be done to save this cemetery. Vandals and thieves 
have destroyed tombstones and have taken precious relics of the past. I was told that some of the 
tombstones were being sold to an antique store. Weeds have grown up so plentiful that one cannot even 
find a gravestone of an ancestor or departed loved one. There have been recent burials, which are easier 
to find, but even they are left to the destroying effects of the elements. It's a disgrace to the community 
and a major "eyesore" for the State to have this occur. 

With a population of about 700 residents, I can see that there are no funds available to take care of this 
cemetery, which sits upon a knoll in the northern part of the city. With all the wealth that is in the State 
of Nevada, I cannot understand why this historical landmark is not being preserved for our future 
generations. There are underground pipes that were put in for the sprinkling system to the cemetery, but 
they are never turned on. There is no grass, but only weeds & sagebrush up to ones knees, depending on 
how tall a person is. It is easy to trip across rocks and stones. One can easily get tangled up in a broken 
barbed wire fence laying on the ground. Timber from old graves lie about in chaotic fashion, as if they 
were blown up by some mortar shell. Gravestones are broken and some are sunken into the ground, 
making it difficult to locate. It is hilly terrain, and difficult to walk without any paved paths. If you do 
find the grave that you are looking for, you have to practically clean it up before you can take a picture of 
the tombstone. There are 12 small cemeteries all together in that one area, and without a map or guide, 
one would be quite lost in finding where their ancestor lies. The cemetery is closed to vehicle traffic. 

Since my ancestor lies in an unmarked grave in this cemetery, I'll never know where he is, because 
records were not kept. He died in 1861 from Typhoid Fever. Without the letters that were written in 1861 
to his family, I would never have known that he was buried in this cemetery. Unfortunately, far too many 
graves are unmarked in this cemetery. All the history has gone, because there are no tombstones to say, 
who was buried there and what the dates were of birth and death. This is such a catastrophe, because very 
often we have to rely on these markers to give us that information.

What I would like to propose is that a committee be formed to look at this problem. It could be called, 
"PROJECT: RESTORATION." I firmly believe that the cemetery could be restored. This would create 
jobs for people, who are probably on the welfare roles now. (This would be a good project for juvenile 
delinquents to perform community service. Perhaps even a project for the penal system's inmates.) There 
needs to be a cemetery "sexton." No one knows anything about the people buried in 1861 in unmarked 
graves, let alone other unmarked graves at any given year. 

Another thing that I would like to see happen is this:
All the Civil War soldiers, who are buried in this cemetery have NO FLAGS by their tombstone. I 
filmed one such tombstone and read it's epitaph. (I have a video that I filmed of the cemetery.) It's stone 
was broken in half and put back together but it may not hold up long. No flag honors this soldier, who 
gave up his life for his country. I would like to see all the Civil War Soldiers' tombstones marked with 
Flags to honor their service.
Virginia City was the leading supporter in the cause of the Civil War. This city financed the Civil 
War. Now, this city is broke and cannot finance anything. I know that there are people in this city, who 
do care about the cemetery, but they cannot finance it's restoration.

I'm pleading with you, Gov. Miller, to please preserve this landmark for our future generations. It's fast 
becoming lost. I would like to place a marker for my ancestor in this cemetery, but I am hesitant to do so, 
for fear that thieves and vandals will destroy it. He has a beautiful but tragic story to tell, which would 
add to the history of the city.

Sincerely,
Mary Auffhammer

.................more
This seems to be a little fishy. I wonder if someone is pocketing the money that is supposed to go to the 
cemetery?
Mary
-----------------

Forwarded Message: 
Subj: Re: Virginia City Cemetery
Date: 98-09-24 21:03:51 EDT
From: mmason@govmail.state.nv.us (Melaine Mason)
To: AletaM@AOL.COM

Thank you for your comments regarding the cemeteries located in Storey
County. The cemeteries are managed by the county.

In 1997 the Comstock Historic Commission was created during the Legislature
to oversee the appropriated funds to be used for restoration of the
cemeteries. Since that time, there have been improvements to the Virginia
City cemetery. As funds permit, there will be additional restoration
conducted.

Again, thank you for your comments and concern about a piece of Nevada's
history.
-----Original Message-----
Subject: Virginia City Cemetery

>I am writing concerning the condition of your Pioneer Cemeteries, of which
>Virginia City is one.
>These sacred places where our dead rest are also vital sources of
information for those who are tracing their families. They can be lovely peaceful
places for meditation of deep thought.
>
>It is a real shame when they are left to rot away and become just another
>piece of real estate. I would like to request that, during a future visit to Utah, you visit some
of our Pioneer Cemeteries. A list of a few follow.
>
>Pioneer Cemetery on "1st" Avenue between State Street and "A" Avenue, Salt
>Lake City. Brigham Young is buried there.
>Salt Lake City Cemetery in the area of "N" Avenue and "6th" Avenue.
>Provo City Cemetery
>WIllard City Pioneer Cemetery
>Most towns in Utah have well preserved Pioneer Cemeteries. They would be
>happy to have you see them and talk to you about ways that this can be
done.
>
>Thank you for your attention on this matter.
>
>Aleta Morrison

{{{{Mary}}}} Thanks for the heads up. Hope I have all this in the right order. HEADS UP "FAITHFUL".... NEWS FLASH..... Another instance of Neglect. Don't beat them up, just remind them of their Responsibility to Safeguard the Heritage of their State as the "Elected" representatives of their "warm and loving" electorate..... :-)
************************************************************************************* 
Subj: Civil War Information
Date: 98-09-15 14:19:23 EDT
From: JJEWER1
To: GFS Jim

Jim,

I am having trouble locating information about my GGfather, John Henry Jewer. He had the number 4 
east coast pilots license but what I am trying to find out about is what he did on the Mississippi campaign. 
According to my father, my GGfather was a captain in the Navy on one or more of the vessels that went 
from Cairo down to Vickburg. in contacting the Naval department, they had no information about a 
Captain name Jewer, or Jour or any similiar spelling.

How can I find the names of the civilian pilots who were on the vessels and were some of the 
commissioned officers who commanded vessels early in this also US Army personel as I perceived from 
some of my reading.
Thanks for any assistance
Jim Jewer

"Jim" - Check the information "above" in the HELP DESK for "Service Records of Sailors". This is an 
index I've listed there called "Index to Rendezvous Reports, Civil War 1861 - 1865, which may be of 
some help. This records can be found , not only at the National Archives, BUT at your local Family 
History Center. Good Hunting...
*************************************************************************************
Subj: The New Math?
From: Bulldogtjr

A ten-year-old Jewish boy was failing math. His parents tried
everything from tutors to hypnosis; but to no avail.
Finally, at the insistence of a family friend, they decided to
enroll their son in a private Catholic school.
After the first day, the boy's parents were surprised when he
walked in after school with a stern, focused and very determined
expression on his face.
He went straight past them, right to his room and quietly
closed the door. For nearly two hours he toiled away in his room
- with math books strewn about his desk and the surrounding
floor. He emerged long enough to eat, and after quickly cleaning
his plate, went straight back to his room, closed the door and
worked feverishly at his studies until bedtime.
This pattern of behavior continued until it was time for the
first quarter's report card. The boy walked in with it unopened
- laid it on the dinner table and went straight to his room.
Cautiously, his mother opened it and, to her amazement, she saw a
large red 'A' under the subject of Math.
Overjoyed, she and her husband rushed into their son's room,
thrilled at his remarkable progress.
"Was it the nuns that did it?" the father asked.
The boy shook his head and said "No."
"Was it the one-to-one tutoring? The peer-mentoring?"
"No."
"The textbooks? The teachers? The curriculum?"
"No", said the son. "On that first day, when I walked in the front door and
saw that guy nailed to the plus sign, I KNEW they meant business!"

"Ted" that is deep......
************************************************************************************* 
NOTES from Dee -----
Jayne-- I sent a reply to Jim a bit ago--he made me 93!!!!! Hilarious and I know where he got that, 
although it took me awhile to figure it out--My aunt, Olga Teeple of Prosser, Washington is 96 and still 
plays in the senior center band, lives alone and does gardening and is a very bright lady had a piece in the 
Tacoma paper about her.
I also did not quit 4 years ago, I bought my computer 4 years ago but the heart attack in 1997 did the 
retirement abit for me--I got a great kick out of that-- Tell him I think he did well to even remember my 
name. I did send him some of the storm news--today the kids went back to school, Crestview-18 miles 
away is an island--surrounded by rivers--Shoal and Yellow and it is flooding the toen--number of new 
homes are now half under water--disastrous situations all around us--roads closed and even closed 
Interstate 10 into Florida from Alabama because of the river overflows..Maybe he can forward you my EM 
to him this AM---anyhow, gave me a chuckle this morning ---hope that you are fine--In another week we 
may be back to normal and hope not to greet any more unwelcome Earl's or Georges--Georges really liked 
us, after going by he turned completely around and came back!!!! LOLSee you all tonight Dee

{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{Dee}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}} Heh Heh Well all the information was there, it just got scrambled a bit. ROTFLOL You stay dry now, You h'yar....... It blows my mind that I - 10 is under water. I just drove over that highway on the way to Pensacola on Friday afternoon. I must really just hightailed it out of "Dodge".....
*************************************************************************************
Subj: hoping for info...
From: Goosemouse

Hello,
I caught one of your chats one night..and I was hoping that you could help me find out the dates that a battle was fought on Devils backbone, a ridge in Western Arkansas..Sabastian County.. Thanks for your kindness, April

{April} - glad you dropped us a line... Here's what I found on your question... The fighting on "Devil's Backbone", also referred to as "Backbone Mountain" in Arkansas occurred on 1 September 1863. This was the start of the big push on Little Rock.
************************************************************************************* 
Subj: FW: FOR ALL BUSY PEOPLE IN THE WORLD
From: Your wandering Co-Host.

A friend sent this to me and it says a lot..... and because you are neat folk, I had to share it, and maybe draw a smile..... or two, .... and maybe you'll want to pass it along as well.....

GFS Jim

FOR ALL BUSY PEOPLE IN THE WORLD.

Around the corner I have a friend
In this great city that has no end,
Yet the days go by and weeks rush on,
And before I know it, a year is gone

And I never see my old friend's face,

For life is a swift and terrible race,
He knows I like him just as well,
As in the days when I rang his bell,
And he rang mine.

If, we were younger then,
And now we are busy, tired men.
Tired of playing a foolish game,
Tired of trying to make a name.

"Tomorrow" I say "I will call on Jim"
"Just to show that I'm thinking of him."
But tomorrow comes and tomorrow goes, And
distance between us grows and grows.

Around the corner!- yet miles away,
"Here's a telegram sir-"
"Jim died today."
And that's what we get and deserve in the end.
Around the corner, a vanished friend.

If you love someone, tell them.
Remember always to say what you mean.
Never be afraid to express yourself.
Take this opportunity to tell someone
what they mean to you.

Seize the day and have no regrets.
Most importantly, stay close to your
friends and family, for they have helped
make you the person that you are today
and are what it's all about anyway.

Pass this along to your friends.
Let it make a difference in your day and
theirs. The difference between.
expressing love and having regrets
is that the regrets may stay around
forever.

Within 1 hour you must send it to
other people. Within five days you
will have a miraculous occurrence in
your relationships. You will find new
love or have an old love rekindled.

If you do not send it, you will have
once again passed up the opportunity
to do something loving and beautiful
and continue the trend that gives you
problems in your relationships.

If you've received this it is because
someone cares for you and it means
there is probably at least someone for
whom you care.

*************************************************************************************

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate 
one Thursday a month to the sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; 
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, 
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on 
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly 
Fireside." 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from 
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- 
haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Host GFS Jim and our many 
fill-in friends :) 

10/01/98 - OPEN CHAT 

10/08/98 - "Letters, Songs and Poems" Night,. Don't miss it. 

10/15/98 - OPEN CHAT

10/22/98 - "The Red River Campaign" - GFS Jim

10/29/98 - "OPEN CHAT"

11/5/98 - "Border Wars" - GFS Jim "Many have asked for this again so here it is."

11/12/98 - "Letters, Songs, and Poems" Night......

11/19/98 - OPEN CHAT

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne and GFS Jim

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group 
Distribution Coast to Coast 
Week ending 11 October 1998

What a great time we had Thursday night for "Letters, Songs and Poems". And "My Goodness", did we ever have a treat. My 'ole' partner from the "long ago" beginnings of this Special Interest Group back in 1996, when we had a History Forum, came by to visit. Known then as GFH TEX "Jim Reynolds". {{{Jim}}} ole pard, it was GREAT to see you again, my friend - Heh Heh!!! What a treat. I didn't get a chance to tell you this, but before you left back in 1996, we were still planning out our year of lectures, and you were talking about Fredericksburg, and setting up a "Fireside" to tell about the battle. Well I started reading and researching and I came across a "piece" in one of my readings telling about the regimental bands in the Civil War and one story documented in a soldier's diary that mentioned an incident that took place that the vicinity of Fredericksburg just a week or two after the battle. I developed a story from bits and pieces and a "wee bit" of imagination. It has become a favorite of the "faithful", and as you've never heard it, I'm going to include it in the "Fireside" this week, because you were the inspiration for it and you never knew that....

Sooooooo, this is for YOU Jim Reynolds - GFH TEX. Here's the Story.............................

It has been documented in many, many places, from diaries and letters of Civil War Veterans, to newspaper stories, about a tradition that occurred over and over in Federal and Confederate camps at the end of the day. At twilight, the regimental bands would begin their evening concerts. When the armies were bivouacked close to each other, the bands would play of an evening, and sometimes they would compete with each other or they would alternate playing different songs back and forth. Toward the end of their concerts the music would become tender and soothing calling up memories of home, family and better days.

I'm going to tell you about one such occasion. It's twilight in Virginia, along the Rappahannock River. The Union Army of about 100,000 is camped on one side of the river and the Confederate Army of 70,000 is camped on the other. It's bitter cold that night on the 13th of December, 1862. A few weeks earlier they had fought the Battle of Fredericksburg, at that time in the conflict, the bloodiest battle ever fought on American soil. 12,000 Federals and 5,000 Confederates had been killed or wounded. The bands from both armies had been playing that night and they were coming to the close of their concerts. That night they had alternated back and forth, the music becoming more and more tender, bringing tears and longing to the hearts of the soldiers. Finally one Federal band had started one of the Civil War's favorite tunes. The music floated over the river, while men and boys, were writing letters home. The moon was out and it's light shown down on thousands of campfires sending streams of smoke up into the cold air. The music was so light, and haunting. No sooner had the Federal band started than a Confederate band joined in. One at a time, the other regimental bands on both sides joined in, adding their "voice" to the music. Pens were put down, card games stopped; all talk and sounds of cleanup and preparing for bed stopped.......; except for the music. Finally every regimental band had joined in to meld the music together. Still not a sound from 170,000 souls as they sat motionless with their frosty breath and the campfire smoke rising into the moonlit sky, listening to that "unearthly" song........

"Mid pleasures and palaces though we may roam,
Be it ever so humble there's no place like home!
A charm from the skies seems to hallow us there,
Which, seek through the world, is ne'er met with elsewhere;
Home! Home! sweet, sweet, Home!
There's no place like Home!
There's no place like Home."

The music slowly began to fade, until the last note just drifted off into the night, fainter and fainter, until...... nothing. Suddenly from that awesome silence, both sides "Roared" up with a heart-rending SHOUT, and started cheering, jumping up and down, and throwing their hats in the air. In the words of one witness, Frank Mixson, Private, 1st South Carolina Volunteers; "Had there not been a river between them, the two armies would have met face to face, shaken hands, and ended the war on that spot.

The song; "Home Sweet Home" by John Howard Payne. Thank you Ernest L. Abel for your article in the May 1996 edition of "America's Civil War" Magazine that reminded me of this incredible incident.
*******************
Well - that's what that "spark" of your's started ole friend :-) Hope you get as much out of it as I do. I get cold chills, and the hair on my neck starts to rise right up and my eyes cloud over a bit. But, that's why we do, what we do isn't it?????

Well !! Back to business..... Heh Heh ! OH By the way; I remembered the book that blew me away. This is a must, if want to get real... The Book: "Dream's End"; About: 2 Iowa brothers in the Civil War; Source of material: from the family archives and the letters from the brothers; the Authors: Orr Kelly and Mary Davies Kelly. A MUST READ!!! It's a heart breaker...

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU :-)..... 
COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.... 

This continuing series I'm putting in the newsletter under the HELP DESK, is on the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers (FHCs)........ So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that we thought this would be of worth in your research.... 

This upcoming Thursday is CHAT. So come and join us for a neat experience..... You'll like it, we promise....

************************************************************************************* 

THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. Meeting Logs are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters". 
************************************************************************************* 
U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers............................. 

The next stage of this series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records 
available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

Specific Union Sources........................... 

Union Army soldiers may have served in the U.S. Army, local militia units mustered into federal service, 
or volunteer regiments raised by the individual states. The length of service varied from 90 days to three 
years. Many soldiers also re-enlisted serving in more than one regiment. The Union Army and Navy 
enlisted over 2.3 million men, of which nearly 359,000 died in combat or from wounds and disease. 

Union Service Records 

Service Records of Soldiers. - There is currently no master index to the names of soldiers who served in 
Union volunteer regiments. (Note from the editor: A Union Soldiers Roster is in the making by Broadfoot 
Publishing. It's up to 13 volumes as this writing, but it's still incomplete.) Individual indexes to state volunteer regiments are available on microfilm for every Northern state and every Southern state except South Carolina. Most service records have not been microfilmed and are available only at the National Archives. The following service records and indexes are available on microfilm at the National Archives and the Family History Libraries........ 

........... continued. 

Records of Officers. for biographical sketches of officers (both Army and Navy) and other information, see the following:

Adjutant General's Office. "Official Army Register of the Volunteer Force of the Unted States Army for the Years 1861, 62, 63, 64, 65. 8 vols. 1865-67." Reprint Gaithersburg, Md.: Olde Soldier Books, 1987. (FHL book 973 M23us 1987; films 1,320,524-27.) This set lists the names of officers and contains brief organizational information for each regiment. It includes the dates and names of officers promoted, resigned, discharged, dead, missing and dismissed.

Hamersly, Lewis R. "The Records of Living Officers of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps; with a History of Naval Operations during the Rebellion of 1861-65, and a List of Ships and Officers Participating in the Great Battles." 1870. Reprint. Mattituck, N.T.: J.M. Carroll & Co., 1985. (FHL book 973 M3h.)

Hunt, Roger D., and Jack R. Brown. "Brevet Brigadier Generals in Blue." Gaithersburg, Md.: Olde Soldier Books. 1990. (FHL book 973 M2hu.)

Powell, William H. ed. "Officers of the Army and Navy (Volunteer) Who Served in the Civil War", Philadelphia, Pa.: L.R. Hamersly & Co., 1893. (FHL book 973 M2p; film 599,644, item 1.)

--------------------------. "Officers of the Army and Navy (Regular) Who Served in the Civil War." Philidelphia, Pa.: L.R. Hamersly & Co., 1892. (FHL book 973 M2p; film 599,644, item 2.)

Warner, Ezra J. "Generals in Blue: Lives of the Union Commanders." Baton Rouge, La.: Louisiana, State Universite Press, 1964. (FHL book 973 M2war.)

.......................to be continued
************************************************************************************ 
From: FI WATROUS

Military Records Thought to Have Been Lost - 
Duplicates Found!!

UPDATE FROM IKE on the information on Lost Records posted last Fireside......
Jim, So sorry but the message placed in the Fireside regarding duplicate records found
has proven to be a hoax. Please delete that message from your files! I passed on information which hit several lists. They even gave a reputable source. The information is false! I'm embarrassed to have been the one to unwittingly perpetuate a falsehood.

{{{{Ike}}}} Don't you DARE be embarressed. We aren't clairvoyant are we?????? You are the best "giver" of great information in the Forum. We publish what we find and if info later arrives that proves it inaccurate, then we indicate that as well. I point you to the bottom of the "Fireside" to the area of "WHAT WE ARE ABOUT" and OUR PROMISE......... Ike, my man, you keep that information rolling in. We love ya......... :-) ************************************************************************************ 
Regimental Histories................... GFS Jim

I have two Web Site addresses for you which have SOME listings and some other Web Site addresses of individuals maintaining Web Pages for specific regiments/companies. Jim Reynolds provided the second site. I'm going to list both below. I'm also going to keep this "Help Note" up for awhile. If any of you out there have run across any other sites that contain this type of "History" information, please send them in and I'll add them to this list for the membership's use......

The James River Publication Web Site. Note: around page 3 of the Home Page will be the Regimental History listings. This site is inviting any and all who maintain Web Pages pertaining to Regimental Histories to submit them for posting. 
http://www.erols.com/jreb/civilwar.htm

The Tarlton Home Page.
http://www.tarleton.edu/activities/pages/facultypages/jones/confed/

I also went out and visited Jim Reynolds Home page and for those of you doing research on TEXAS REGIMENTS, you get out there poste haste.... It looks like Jim is "building" what they call a Web Ring for dedicated folk to link in the regimental histories into a "Texas Regiment" Web Ring. GOOD LUCK Jim and keep us posted on your progress or any assistance you need. :-)
the site address is: http://home.swbell.net/jamesrey
************************************************************************************ 
ATTENTION to ALL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
There is a new "Military Families Chat on Wed nights at 7 in Ancestral Digs with GFS Beri
and GFH JimmA... Drop by and learn even more in this chosen field of ours......

*********************************************************************************** 
DID YOU KNOW?? ................................... 
Excerpts taken from "Best Little Stories from the Civil War" by C. Brian Kelly..... 

"Tidbits from the social notes.............................................

At the recent inaugural festivities for His Excellency Mr. Davis in Montgomery, the noted hostess Aurelia Blassingame Fitzpatrick, wife of the former U.S. Senator, raised more than a few eyebrows when she boldly poked the Confederacy's newly installed leader in the back with her parasol, merely to gain his attention so that she might have a word with him.
It is said also that she was no hesitant, whether then or on other occasions, to urge her own husband upon Mr. Davis as a candidate for his Cabinet. The audacious aurelia shocked some of the other ladies yet again upon telling Mr. Davis that his reference to a possibly long war was "too gloomy" a remark to make.
Far from gloomy were the bright balls and dinner parties attended by fabulous Southern belles whose encouragement would mean so much to their men at war. One young lady, Ida Rice, was so popular that her countrymen named a cannon in Charleston harbor for her.
Returning to the inaugural ceremonies themselves, wasn't it a sight when all those pretty laides on a balcony above the swearing-in let loose a cascade of flowers upon Mr. Davis!
Quite a flutter of attention has been stirred also by adoption of the official Confederate flat -- a handsome and eye-catching standard of red, white, and blue, (like the Yankee flag in colors only!). How fitting that the flag hould be hoisted at the new capital for the first time by Letitia Tyler, granddaughter of the former President and Virginia Governor John Tyler -- namesake also of his first wife, Letitia, who bore him seven children before per passing during his presidency.
Speading of Washington and things Union, one true Southern lady who would prefer to put true embarrassment behind her is Elodie Todd of Selma, Alabama, half-sister of Mary Todd Lincoln, who sits in the Union White House presently as wife of Abraham. It may be fact that Miss Elodie is engaged to her handsome Captain Nathaniel H.R. Dawson, but that perfectly proper liaison has not protected her from hearing the most ugly sentiments expressed within her hearing about the husband of her sister. Said the future Mrs. Dawson in a letter to her beloved, "People constantly wish he may be hung and all such evils may attend his footsteps."
Doing her utmost to bear up, Miss Elodie donated the Captain's "Magnolia Cadets" of Selma a silken banner to take into battle with them -- battle against her sister's union quite naturally.
All over Alabama in these exciting and turbulent days, the ladies have been making many a wondrous contribution to the cause. Nor have they shirked at patriotically offering their men to the gods of war.
For instance, Maria Ellinton of Russell County recently marched into the field where her own two sons were busy at their work and told them to join the army and serve until whenever the war against the Union should end. Further, an anonymous letter-writer not only told readers of a Montgomery newspaper that mothers should offer their sons to battle, but also advised those same sons "they must die" facing the enemy and entrust themselves "in His care Who is the God of war."
In Selma, meanwhile, at least one lady took it upon herself to avoid stepping out with any man who was not in uniform. Another Selma lass broke off an engagement to a young man who had not yet enlisted. Adding deepest sort of insult to injury, she sent him a skirt and ladies' undergarments, together with her tart advice, "Wear these or volunteer."
With activities and sentiments like these, can ther be any doubt as to the future prospect of the Confederate cause!
Indeed, if the ladies could only join their menfolk at the front lines, there would be no lingering doubts whatsoever. For example, word has been received of the confrontation off Appalachicola, Florida, where a Yankee ship had the audacity to stop and board a Confederate blockade-running ship. As the Confederate flag sadly fluttered down from its proud perch, Mrs. F. Holland of Greenville snatched it up before any onlooker, Yankee or Rebel, could move. Wrapping the proud flag about her own body, she told the startled onlookers that she would die rather than surrender the "holy banner." Even her husband was aghast, but the Yankee officer in charge honored her stnad (perhaps somewhat sardonically, true) with a single-gun salute. With heroes, or heroines, like Mrs. Holland, how can the South lose? Truly now?

************************************************************************************
A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................ 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................ 

************************************************************************************
From: WSMORGANV

Hi, Jim.
You can let the group know that I have just completed a survey of all the Civil War veterans buried in Orange County, Florida. (Orlando area) I have a text file put together that I would be happy to forward to anyone interested.

Regards,
William Morgan
Orlando, FL

"William" - thank you for sharing your hard work.... NOTE: I checked with William to make sure that it was OK for me to post this. He indicated he is writting a book with some of this information, however he did want very much to provide the text file to any who would be interested in a copy to further their research. So, if any of you are interested, send an email to William (see above) with your request. As he is producing a book with this material, we won't be posting in the forum library. THANKS AGAIN William for your extreme generosity in sharing..... :-) 
*************************************************************************************
Subj: CIV/HIS: Atlanta "bread riot"
From: JennieWade

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA]
March 19, 1863, p. 3, c. 1
Crinoline Imitations of the Habits of Certain Officials.

Yesterday morning some fifteen or twenty women, residents of this
city, all decently and some even well dressed--wearing golden earbobs
and breastpins--collected and went around the city to a number of our
grocery merchants and "seized" certain articles of provisions--bacon at
one place, meal at another, vegetables at another, &c., &c. They did
not plead poverty, or pressing want, or solicit donations or anything of
the kind. They had money, and said they had employment making clothes
for the government, by which they could make money, but refused to give
the common prices of the articles they wanted; therefore, they had
collected in a body and were going round _seizing_ what they wanted and
paying whatever prices they thought proper.
Whatever may be said of the conduct of these ladies on its merits,
we have this to say. It is but an imitation of many illustrious
examples which men in high position have set them. Gov. Brown commenced
it by seizing salt and fixing a price upon it, precisely as these women
did yesterday; and the officials of the Confederate Government, high and
low, have been doing the same in Virginia, Georgia, Mississippi and
Texas.
Now these women have just as much right to seize the property of
others and fix a price upon it, paying that and no more, as Gov. Brown,
or General Bragg or General Permberton [sic] or Captain--anybody, and
their necessities, we venture, are as great as in any case of seizure
that has yet been made, where an arbitrary price has been fixed by the
seizer. Is it any wonder that people become imbued with a spirit of
lawlessness with such examples set before them?
But mark the difference. In the one case this robbery has been
_tolerated_--submitted to by the sufferers, owing to their
patriotism--not wishing to resist what might _appear_ to some to be a
patriotic duty to submit to, or what might be enforced at the point of
the bayonet; but the police were set upon these women who quickly
dispersed them.
So the world wags.

SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY [ATLANTA, GA]
March 20, 1863, p. 3, c. 4
More of Those Women.
Day before yesterday, on the seizing of groceries by the women,
Marshal Williford requested the parties to desist and go home.--He
further asked them to come back to him next day (yesterday), at 10
o'clock, and that he would, in the meantime, make every effort to obtain
something to relieve their necessities. Accordingly, yesterday, quite a
number of them met him at the appointed time. He had collected by
voluntary contributions from a number of our citizens about $500. He
required all of them asking assistance to register their names and
residence. In surveying the crowd, he discovered a few who were really
needy and worthy objects of charity. Others were notoriously bad
characters, and some were represented by persons who were present to be
the wives of men not in the army, and in comfortable circumstances.
Marshal Williford here stated that he would hold on to what funds
he had, and raise more until Saturday; and that in the meantime they and
any others who were needy, could continue to register their names and
give him satisfactory evidence of the justice of their claims; and that
by this means he could protect himself and the contributors from being
imposed upon by those who were unworthy, and be able to give the greater
relief to those who were in need and were really worthy and deserving.
We think these women had better desist, and not imitate the example
of Gov. Brown and a few Confederate officers, and some men who have made
seizures, pretending to be officers. They had better not violently take
the property of others. If they are needy, their best way is to make
their wants known, and we venture that they will always be promptly
provided for. Let the Governor, government agents, and the women all,
pause and reflect. Whither are we drifting? Shall we have any law and
order, or any respect for private or personal rights and individual
immunities? or shall we resolve the whole country into a giant mob, and
the biggest dog carry off the bone?

Vicki Betts
Texas Rifles and LSFS
vbetts@gower.net

{{{{Jennie}}}}} Bless your heart, girl!!!!! Thanks for passing these on.... GREAT MATERIAL
*************************************************************************************
From: AslanJ
Y'all are fabulous!!! I used to be able to be at the chat every Thurs but then our family went into a "decline" - too much illness, surgeries and stuff (all families have this kind of thing happen once in a great while, where we wonder if our name has been changed to "Job", but then we find out we don't have THAT much to deal with, Praise GOD!!). Anyway, I am hoping I can join you again tonight, but even if I don't make it, I want you to know how much I enjoy the Fireside Weekly. It is wonderful and I read every word. You are doing a great job.
I LOVVVVVVE ya, Buddies!!! {{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}

Judy Canant - Lakeland, FL (and no, we didn't get much wind, we just got a bunch of rain and it is still cloudy) <G> 

{{{{{Judy}}}}}} <VBG> 
************************************************************************************* 
From: BettyLAtw

Jim-
Re: FROM THE OTHER SIDE. I have never been to the WALL but this ode really touched me and I too "bawled". I had no one close who served in that war but doubtless have distant unknown cousins who did. Mr. Patrick Camunes did us all a great service by composing this magnificent tribute.

{{{{Betty}}}} Yes he did...... "Ike & Fbenway" what would we do without ya!!!!!! Touching a heart is a "Gift"....
*************************************************************************************
From: EWilker
I really enjoy all the interesting things you talk about in your Chats. It has been most informing and I enjoy reading all the things you talk about. I wish someone would do that about the Revolutionary War, as some of my ancestors fought in that battle.

Alot of my family were Quakers, but they also did things to help those that fought in that battle for Freedom.

Is there such a chat letter? I wish someone would set up something like that for those of us that had ancestors that fought in that war.
Thanks again for the interesting and informative Fireside chat.
Ellen 

{{{Ellen}}} Thanks for your note. I don’t know of any Revolutionary War Newsletter currently being circulated. I too wish there were. I was a CoHost 2 years ago when we had the History Forum in a Revolutionary War SIG and it was great. However I will circulate your “wish” to the staff. Who knows!!!!! :-)
*************************************************************************************
From: PinkPJ1934

Thank you very much for sending the Fireside news letter. I look forward to reading it each week.
Sincerely
Eleanor

{{Eleanor}} It is indeed our pleasure...... We’re glad we’re “hitting the mark”!!!
*************************************************************************************

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate 
one Thursday a month to the sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; 
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, 
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on 
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly 
Fireside." 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from 
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- 
haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Host GFS Jim and our many 
fill-in friends :) 

10/01/98 - OPEN CHAT 

10/08/98 - "Letters, Songs and Poems" Night,. Don't miss it. 

10/15/98 - OPEN CHAT

10/22/98 - "The Red River Campaign" - GFS Jim

10/29/98 - "OPEN CHAT"

11/5/98 - "Border Wars" - GFS Jim "Many have asked for this again so here it is."

11/12/98 - "Letters, Songs, and Poems" Night......

11/19/98 - OPEN CHAT

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne and GFS Jim

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group 
Distribution Coast to Coast 
Week ending 18 October 1998 

It was a FINE time we had with all the "Faithful" Thursday night.... GFS Jayne and I were buried answering questions and looking up material. Soooo, if we missed your question in the Chat Room, we heartily apologize. We review the Chat Logs and hopefully will pick up your questions and pursue them at that time. I just was informed Thursday before the SIG that I will be on the road again "Groan"!! So, 
please take notice in the Upcoming Events Schedule that the "Border Wars" Fireside that was scheduled for 11/5/98 will be shifted to 11/19/98. So I won't be able to attend the SIGs for the Thursdays of 10/29/98 and 11/5/98, but I will be back in the saddle after that....

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU :-)..... 
COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.... 

The continuing series I'm putting in the newsletter under the HELP DESK, is on the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers (FHCs)........ So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that we thought this would be of worth in your research.... 

This upcoming Thursday on the "Red River Campaign" by GFS Jim. So come and join us for a neat experience..... You'll like it, we promise....

************************************************************************************* 

THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters". 
************************************************************************************* 
U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers............................. 

The next stage of this series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records 
available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

Specific Union Sources........................... 

Union Army soldiers may have served in the U.S. Army, local militia units mustered into federal service, 
or volunteer regiments raised by the individual states. The length of service varied from 90 days to three 
years. Many soldiers also re-enlisted serving in more than one regiment. The Union Army and Navy 
enlisted over 2.3 million men, of which nearly 359,000 died in combat or from wounds and disease. 

Union Service Records 

Service Records of Soldiers. - There is currently no master index to the names of soldiers who served in 
Union volunteer regiments. (Note from the editor: A Union Soldiers Roster is in the making by Broadfoot 
Publishing. It's up to 13 volumes as this writing, but it's still incomplete.) Individual indexes to state volunteer regiments are available on microfilm for every Northern state and every Southern state except South Carolina. Most service records have not been microfilmed and are available only at the National Archives. The following service records and indexes are available on microfilm at the National Archives and the Family History Libraries........ 

........... continued. 

Pension Records

The pension law governing claims based on death or disability from military service was passed 14 July 1862. Later pension laws were based on length of service and disability not necessarily incurred in the service. An index to pension claims is listed as follows:

"General Index to Pension Files, 1961 - 1934". National Archives Microfilm Publication T288. (FHL films 540,757-541,300; FHLC computer number 245945.) The index is arranged by the veteran's name (widows's name if he was deceased) and his unit, rank, date and number of application, certificate number, and state of filing (if accepted). To find specific microfilm numbers with the Family History Library Catalog on microfiche, search the Locality section under UNITED STATES - MILITARY RECORDS - PENSIONS - INDEXES.

The pension files have not been filmed and are only available at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. You can obtain photocopies of pension files by using NATF form 80, available from the National Archives. The archives staff will copy only selected documents unless you request copies of all the documents in a file. 

"Veterans Administration Pension Payment Cards, 1907-1933". National Archives Microfilm Publication M850. (FHC films 1,634,036-1,636,574; FHLC computer number 500541.) This index is useful for veterans who were on the pension rolls between 1907 and 1933, except World War I pensioners. About two million cards record payment to veterans and widows. The veteran's name, unit or branch of service, certificate number, law under which pensioned, rate of pension, pension date, date of certificate, place of residence, death date, former roll number, and widow's name may be included on the cards. To find specific microfilm numbers with the Family History Library Catalog on microfiche, search the Locality section under UNITED STATES - MILITARY RECORDS - PENSIONS.

"Organizations Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served between 1861 and 1900." National Archives Microfilm Publication T289. (FHL 765 films; FHLC computer number 462116.) This index is similar in content to the general index and the pension payment cards, but it often provides the death place. The index is alphabetical by state, branch of service, regiment, company, and name of the soldier. To find specific microfilm numbers with the Family History Library Catalog on microfiche, search the Locality section under UNITED STATES - MILITARY RECORDS - PENSIONS - INDEXES.

.......................to be continued
************************************************************************************ 
From: SusiCP
To: GFS Jim, GFS Jayne

thought you could use this for data lots of data Love Susi
-----------------
> From: Carol Askey <askeycj@ix.netcom.com>
> To: MDALLEGA-L@rootsweb.com
> Subject: [MDALLEGA-L] Maryland Pension Rolls 1835
> Date: Wednesday, September 30, 1998 8:52 PM

> Ladies and Gentlemen,
> I have very good news to share with you. Bill Navey has contributed the
> Maryland Pension Rolls of 1835. Bill sent this and other files to Mike
> DeLoach, the NC Archive File Manager. Mike forwarded the file to me.

> The records contain names of significance throughout Maryland. Included
> in the records are the military unit, the age of the individual,
> sometimes the name of heirs and much more. 

> To get to the file, use the following URL and select Miscelleanous.
> http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/md/mdfiles.htm
> Once again, thank you, Bill and Mike!!!!!

> Enjoy!
> Carol Askey
> Maryland USGenWeb Coordinator
> Allegany & Prince George's County MDGenWeb Coordinator

> Maryland Sites
> USGenWeb Site: http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdgenweb/
> Archives: http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/md/mdfiles.htm

> Allegany County Sites
> USGenWeb Site: http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdallegh/
> Archives: http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/md/allegany/

> PG County Sites
> USGenWeb Site: http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdpgeorg/
> Archives: http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/md/pgeorge/

> ==== MDALLEGA Mailing List ====
> IMPORTANT: For index & search access ALSO post queries at:
> http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdallegh/qryform.html

{{{{Susi}}}}} Great information, THANK YOU!!!!
************************************************************************************ 
Regimental Histories................... I'm keeping these up as some folks had difficulty getting to the right place on the Tarlton Page. ......GFS Jim

I have two Web Site addresses for you which have SOME listings and some other Web Site addresses of individuals maintaining Web Pages for specific regiments/companies. Jim Reynolds provided the second site. I'm going to list both below. I'm also going to keep this "Help Note" up for awhile. If any of you out there have run across any other sites that contain this type of "History" information, please send them in and I'll add them to this list for the membership's use......

The James River Publication Web Site. Note: around page 3 of the Home Page will be the Regimental History listings. This site is inviting any and all who maintain Web Pages pertaining to Regimental Histories to submit them for posting. 
http://www.erols.com/jreb/civilwar.htm

The Tarlton Home Page.
http://www.tarleton.edu/ .......activities/pages/facultypages/jones/confed/
"You'll note here that I split this out. The front portion gets you to the Tarlton College entry page. From there find a selection called activites and click on that; on the resultant page, find pages and click on that. Now you see that sequence. Just keep going until you arrive at confed..... Good Luck....

I also went out and visited Jim Reynolds Home page and for those of you doing research on TEXAS REGIMENTS, you get out there poste haste.... It looks like Jim is "building" what they call a Web Ring for dedicated folk to link in the regimental histories into a "Texas Regiment" Web Ring. GOOD LUCK Jim and keep us posted on your progress or any assistance you need. :-)
the site address is: http://home.swbell.net/jamesrey
************************************************************************************ 
From: GENESGENE

This is wonderfully spelled out, who,where to write for information on our ancestors. 
Check it out.
CIVIL WAR GENEALOGY 
http://www.erols.com/jreb/genelogy.html

{{Jean}} Thanks for the tip......
*********************************************************************************** 
DID YOU KNOW?? ................................... 
Excerpts taken from "Best Little Stories from the Civil War" by C. Brian Kelly..... 

"Tidbits from the social notes.............................................

Weeks before the firing on Fort Sumter, Abe Lincoln saw that war was inevitable. He did not wish it, but he was girded for it. It would be a calamity for the nation, but it must be. After all that had passed since the time of his inauguration March 4, 1861, there seemed no other way to preserve and protect the Union. Secession had frozen in place; a new Confederate government had sprung into being in Montgomery; and at Charleston, the guns aimed at Major Robert Anderson's Fort Sumter. The fireaters were dancing in impatience.
Lincoln had only to say the word, to touch fire to fuse, and it would begin: WAR! But Lincoln was wiser than that. And in the South, it took a fireeater to see "Old Abe's" strategy and to warn against falling into his trap.
The fireeater was Georgia's former U.S. Senator Robert Toombs, who only weeks before had risen in the august Senate chamber at Washington to castigate the Republicans as "black" and "perfidious," to denounce the newly elected Lincoln "an enemy of the human race and deserves the execration of all mankind." The same Georgian dared the North to make the Southerners stay in. Like a schoolboy thumbing his nose at a potential adversary, he cried: "Come and do it!" Georgia, he declared, was on the warpath. "We are as ready to fight now as we will ever be! Treason? Bah!"
Those hot words marked his swan song as a senator, for minutes later, in January 1861, Toombs was gone, resigned to join his state in secession (but not before visiting the U.S. Treasury to collect the remainder of his Federal salary and mileage compensation funds for his return home).
Oddly, it was the same Toombs who just a few weeks later, as the newly installed Confederate secretary of state, stood alone to beg Jefferson Davis and his Cabinet to forbear rather than allow guns to open fire in Charleston Harbor. This surprising but astute reaction from Toombs took place April 9 (an auspicious date for any Civil War calendar!). Word had just been received of President Lincoln's message to Governor F.W. Pickens of South Carolina that he, Lincoln, felt constrained to supply the isolated garrison at Fort Sumter. It was a courteous message with serious implications. Come what may.
It was indeed a gauntlet. Lincoln knew the South must act... or back down. And if it be war, Lincoln needed the South to strike the first blow in order to have a unified Union behind him. If only war could resolve the crisis, it must be war initiated by the other party ... who, indeed, had already fired upon a supply ship once in December 1860 and who had already cut off and trapped the garrison of men on the island of Fort Sumter.
It was Toombs, then, who saw what Lincoln was about. Al the Rebel Cabinet was ready to back Jefferson Davis, the new Confederate president, in giving the order to allow force against Fort Sumter -- all but Toombs, who came to the meeting late on April 9, but not too late to warn that "firing on Fort Sumter would inaugurate a civil war greater than any the world has ever seen."
He stalked about the room, then suddenly faced Davis. If the South attacked, he declared, "it is suicide, it is murder, and it will lose us every friend in the North. You will wantonly strike a hornet's nest which extends from the mountains to the ocean; and legions, now quiet, will swarm out to sting us to death." And an epitaph that also was true: "It is unnecessary, it puts us in the wrong. It is fatal."
Despite the Georgian's entreaty for caution, Lincoln "won" the debate in the Confederate Cabinet meeting, for the word that went out by a messenger boy to a telegraph office across the street suited Lincoln's sad purpose very well. Pierre G.T. Beauregard's forces at Charleston were authorized to proceed with the seizure of Fort Sumter. The firing began three days later........

************************************************************************************
A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................ 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................ 

************************************************************************************
Some interesting emails about Hurricane Georges........

The following from a fellow co-worker in the Fort Walton Beach, Niceville, Pensacola area......

> Howdy Jimmy
> You guys left too early. A beautiful Saturday turned somewhat ugly around
> 5 in the afternoon when a tornado went through Mossy Head (12 miles
> northeast of Crestview). Twenty minutes later two tornadoes on the ground
> were reported by the police between I10 and the County Prison road (while
> I was in the shower). County officials ordered evacuation of Okaloosa
> Island late Friday night.
> Route 98 was closed between Fort Walton Beach and Destin by 0730 on Sunday
> morning - three feet of water were flowing across the strip of ground
> between the Gulf and Bay. Would have made a fine sight from the
> Sheraton. (OUR PLACE OF RESIDENCE WHILE ON THE ROAD) 
> Brooks Bridge into Fort Walton was closed to traffic sometime
> yesterday afternoon. A tornado hit a Shalimar (south of Eglin) trailer
> park last night and destroyed five trailers. There was a hotel fire in
> Niceville last night.
> I estimate we've had 10-12 inches of rain here (along R85). I'm sure it's
> a lot more in Fort Walton (the TV station in Pensacola had recorded over
> 17 by midnight, last night). They say we're to get another 6-10 inches
> before the rain ends tomorrow (eye came ashore at Biloxi at around 7 this
> morning and hasn't moved from there in 5 hours. Tornadoes have been
> reported in this area on at least four occasions (but I haven't spotted
> one myself yet (I guess that's good)).
> I'm not sure when this note will go out. My ISP goes through Pensacola to
> the T1 link through New Orleans. 
> I checked the Shoal River bridge this afternoon. I'd say R85 will be
> closed tomorrow.
> Bob Cooke
>

........from GFS Jayne, keeping tabs on the "Faithful"....
Hi all...
This is just to bring you up to date on a couple of the Civil War History chat room members... 
DeeW84 who lives in Niceville, FL, just east of Pensacola is just fine, had no damage and didn't lose electric or phone.
HappyL7221 who lives just outside of Mobile, AL is also just fine. Has some yard repairs to make.. trees, etc. but the house is fine.. she has electric but won't have phone until about next Tues.
Acadian99 who lives just east of Biloxi had a tree limb come through the roof but no major damage.

........a quick response from Bulldogtjr
Glad to hear that Dee and Happy survived Georges nasty visit but I have to say that I do admire Acadian's assessment of a "tree through the roof" as only "minor damage", Gad, these Rebs are tough!!!!! Thanks for the information, Ted (Bulldog)

........from DeeW84, berailing me for my "Senior Moment" in getting her young age wrong LOL
I really enjoyed talking to you and I am glad that you were not here for this past week--As you know, we got hit with the winds on the back side when Georges went in at Biloxi, torrential rains and heavy winds--then Georges liked us so much he turned around and came over to see us, but with much lower winds. However, as a result the rivers are overflowing and as of today (Oct. 1st) roads are closed--Hy 85 to Crestview is closed and the clounty is now separated by the Shoal River overflowing--Interstate 10 was closed at the Alabama line coming into Florida and many of the smaller feeder highways are closed. Crestview is an "island" and has heavy flooding of houses on south side of town--many new homes with water up to top of windows on first floor. We are most fortunate here in Niceville, we seem not to have the flooding or the cutoffsl We had power all the time and some streets near the Choctawhatchee Bay were closed for a few hours. The kids were out of school until today here in Niceville and not all schools are open yet. Tisa"s Restaurant andtheir Friendly Motel burned from a transformer that blew and started the fire. In Ft. Walton Beach Damon's Restauant burned from wires that were sparked by the lightning and the Picture Show, long time favorite (years back) also burned from electrical problems caused by Georges. He has not been kind here--Destin got hit hard and the Okaloosa Island is now just that!! They have a lot of work to do--Of course the Mobile area and Pensacola areas also got hit so hard, pictures that are hard to believe. Gulf front houses that actually moved from beachfront into other houses set back beyond the street along the Gulf. You are lucky that you got out when you did. I am glad you were safe--and doubly glad that we (people in our area) are not any worse than it is. Thankfully we can see the sun again, had over 20 inches of rain here---Sorry to be so long but wanted to tell you I enjoyed talking to you (even if you did make me 9 years older!!!! I will see you tonight at the Fireside!!!!
Give my regards to Jayne too-------DeeW84

"Thought you might enjoy some of the communication between some of "The Faithful" during the recent Hurricane Georges activity on our Southern Coast." :-) You might even give them an email if you like driving nails. I'm thinking "Rosie" still has a tree limb implanted in her roof........

*************************************************************************************
I received two inputs on "The Story of Taps". One was from "JennieWade" and the other from 
"Jtice4840" who indicated her source of information was provided by Lt Colonel Lewis Kirkpatrick, AUS (Ret) ROA, Department of Europe editor; contained in the Reserve Officers Association "THE OFFICER" magazine, May 98 issue.

{{Jan and Jennie}} Thanks for the inputs. This is one of my favorite stories and I had worked this up last year sometime to use in our "Letters, Songs and Poems" evenings and our course you know me, I had to add to the story so it would sound like a Tale from The Fireside...... Here tis for the "Fireside" readers....

"The Beginning of A Military Tradition"

"It all began in year 1862 during the Civil War, when 
a Union Army Captain, Robert Ellicombe, was with his 
men near Harrison's Landing in Virginia. The 
Confederate Army was present on the other side of this 
narrow strip of land and the two armies had been going
at it pretty hard. During the night, Captain Ellicombe 
heard the moan of a soldier who lay mortally wounded 
on the field. Not knowing if it was a Union or 
Confederate soldier, Captain Ellicombe decided to take 
a chance and try to bring the stricken soldier back for 
medical attention. Crawling on his stomach through the 
gun fire, the captain finally reached the soldier and 
began pulling him toward his own encampment. 
When the captain finally reached his own lines, he 
discovered the soldier was actually a Confederate, but 
beyond that, the soldier was dead.

The captain lit a lantern to see the soldier. When he 
gazed on the soldier he had risked his life to return to 
his own lines, his breath caught and the captain went 
numb with shock. In the dim light, he saw it was the 
face of his own son! The boy had been studying 
music in the South when the war broke out and without 
telling his father, he had enlisted in the Confederate
Army. 

The following morning, the heart-broken father asked 
permission of his superiors to give his son a full military 
burial despite the fact he was a soldier in the Confederate
army. His request was partially granted. They disallowed
the portion of the request for a group of army band 
members to play the funeral dirge for his son, but, out of 
respect and sympathy for the father, they did approve the
use of only one musician. Captain Ellicombe chose a bugler. 
He asked the bugler to play the musical notes he had 
found on a piece of paper in the pocket of his dead son's 
uniform jacket. This wish was granted. "
:
In my mind's eye, as we don't know the specific details,
I see the Captain standing over his son's coffin, with a 
few of his close comrades. It's dusk and they're up on a
hill overlooking the Union encampment with all it's 
bustle and prepartion for dinner and a night of rest.
There's a soft sunset in progress and Captain Ellicombe
is standing there with his heart breaking and wondering
"Why"? The Bugler, standing off behind the Captain, 
wets his lips and brings the bugle to his mouth. He blows
the first three notes of the music. The echoed sound floats
through the air and over the encampment. Heads turn to 
hear the notes. The Bugler plays the next three notes of 
the music. Now all activity has stopped, and all heads are 
turned toward the hill. The Bugler continues through the
music. There is not a sound to be heard from the camp as
the last notes echo across the little valley. The heart 
breaking poignancy of the music is awesome. We know 
it was so, because most of us today have heard that Bugler's 
melody, and there's not many hearts that it hasn't broken 
and brought tears to our eyes. The bugle melody was "Taps"
first played at the funeral of it's creator.
*************************************************************************************
Subj: Grand Army of the Republic(Union Vets Organization)
From: RAdams505

You probably know about this organization...Union Vets...had charge of my ggfather's burial in Oregon sometime between 1895-1900. I am trying to find out where he was buried. I've worn my mouse out trying to find something on the net. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Organization no longer active since vets long since gone, but archives must be available somewhere.
Thanks 
Rose Adams

..........a later email: Jim, I have located a great site for this thru the help of a chat room. Now known as Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War. ( www.suvcw.org). Just tho't I'd pass this on in case you have other inquiries. I really apreciate your offer to help.

Rose Adams 

{{{{Rose }}}} Bless your heart, you're a quick one.!!!! Heh heh! However, I do have some additional information.. The Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) was THE major veterans' organization after the war. It reached its largest membership in the 1890s with about 400,000 members. A published history of the organization with biographical sketches of national and state officials is..... "Beath, Robert B. History of the Grand Army of the Republic". New York: Bryan, Taylor & Co., 1889. There are actually two (2) organizations today that can help researching this group. The Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, which you just mentioned has a grave registration committee that marks graves of CW Veterans. In addition to the Web Site you listed, their address is: Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War; c/o James T. Lyons, Secretary; 411 Bartlett Street; Lansing, MI 48915. 
The other society is the "Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War. The address of their library and museum is.... Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War; 503 S. Walnut Street; Springfield, IL. 62704.
************************************************************************************* 
From: MEllis4864

<< FROM THE OTHER SIDE By Patrick Camunes >>
Hi Jim, had to make a comment here .. "Don" I'm bawling...... Me too had to stop a couple of times while I was reading it.. I have not been to the real wall, but a while back they had a traveling one out at the air base (before it closed) and I got to see that. I am conceded a Vietnam Vet only because I happened to join the Navy right at the end of the cut off date (never went to the war though). My father was in that war though, and was wounded there. There is something about that wall, even if you did not lose anyone over there, that makes you want to reach out and touch it, I do not know if I can explain it, it is almost like it is calling out to be touched. 

{{{{ME}}}} I think it is "Our" respect for those that fought and died for our country. Regardless of the turmoil of the times. They still sacrificed the ultimate... I believe there's a verse in the Bible that says, "there is no greater love than to lay down one's life for a brother"...... I think all that is needed is a simple heartfelt "Thank You"....... :-)
*************************************************************************************

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate 
one Thursday a month to the sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; 
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, 
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on 
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly 
Fireside." 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from 
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- 
haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Host GFS Jim and our many 
fill-in friends :) 

10/01/98 - OPEN CHAT 

10/08/98 - "Letters, Songs and Poems" Night,. Don't miss it. 

10/15/98 - OPEN CHAT

10/22/98 - "The Red River Campaign" - GFS Jim

10/29/98 - "OPEN CHAT"

11/5/98 - "OPEN CHAT"

11/12/98 - "Letters, Songs, and Poems" Night......

11/19/98 - "Border Wars" - GFS Jim "Many have asked for this again so here it is."

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne and GFS Jim

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group 
Distribution Coast to Coast 
Week ending 25 October 1998 

“All Joy”!!!!!! What a great session we had Thursday Night with the Tale of the Red River Campaign. Answered a ton of questions, got stumped by a ton, and generally came close to breakin even.... Heh Heh! Jayne and I sure enjoyed having you. Hurry on back. Oh by the way, I’m posting the Red River Campaign the PM so you can download at your leisure.... My dear (real) cousin “Nadine” sent me a note to remind all to grab the new book out “Cold Mountain” by Charles Frazier and published by Random House. “Lass”, ye haf the gift!!!! I’ve been eyeing that book for a bit now and ye beat me to it. Heh Heh! If you folk don’t do anything else between now and Christmas, you get out to the bookstore and get a copy to read. I’m half way through it and I can’t put it down. I just don’t have the words to tell you what Frazier has done.... An awesome effort! I’m listening to some music, as you can imagine me doing, while I’m reading this and I’m not sure where I’ve gone, but I’m pretty humbled, where-ever I’m at. Here’s three of the Cd’s I’m soaking up. “Trav’ling Home (American Spirituals 1770-1870) by the Boston Camerata, directed by Joel Cohen; “Mark O’Connor’s Liberty” with To-To Ma, Wynton Marsalis and James Taylor; and “Rebel in the Woods (Civil War Songs from the Western Border, Vol II) with Cathy Barton, Dave Para and Bob Dyer. You Missouri folk will especially appreciate the fact that they are Boonville, Mo. natives. “Go get a copy Ike”! :-) Well enough ramblin; I’m kinda sad to be away from all of ya for two weeks, but we gotta eat, right????

Again please take notice in the Upcoming Events Schedule that the "Border Wars" Fireside that was scheduled for 11/5/98 will be shifted to 11/19/98. I’ve been reading voraciously here lately and I’ve run across some great material I can’t wait to share at the Fireside Tales.... We’ll have a great run up through Christmas. :-)

This Thursday is OPEN CHAT......................

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU :-)..... 
COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.... 

The continuing series I'm putting in the newsletter under the HELP DESK, is on the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers (FHCs)........ So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that we thought this would be of worth in your research.... 

This upcoming Thursday on the "Red River Campaign" by GFS Jim. So come and join us for a neat experience..... You'll like it, we promise....

************************************************************************************* 

THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters". 
************************************************************************************* 
U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers............................. 

The next stage of this series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records 
available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

Specific Union Sources........................... 

Union Army soldiers may have served in the U.S. Army, local militia units mustered into federal service, 
or volunteer regiments raised by the individual states. The length of service varied from 90 days to three 
years. Many soldiers also re-enlisted serving in more than one regiment. The Union Army and Navy 
enlisted over 2.3 million men, of which nearly 359,000 died in combat or from wounds and disease. 

Union Service Records 

Service Records of Soldiers. - There is currently no master index to the names of soldiers who served in 
Union volunteer regiments. (Note from the editor: A Union Soldiers Roster is in the making by Broadfoot 
Publishing. It's up to 13 volumes as this writing, but it's still incomplete.) Individual indexes to state volunteer regiments are available on microfilm for every Northern state and every Southern state except South Carolina. Most service records have not been microfilmed and are available only at the National Archives. The following service records and indexes are available on microfilm at the National Archives and the Family History Libraries........ 

........... continued. 

Draft Records

By 1863 it became necessary for the federal government to enroll and draft men into the Army. The Constription Act declared that men between the ages of 20 and 45 were eligible for duty. Aliens who had filed their declaration of intention to become citizens were also eligible. Records relating to the draft are at the National Archives in Record Group 110, “Records of the Provost Marshal General’s Bureau” and have not yet been microfilmed. They include the following:
Consolidated Lists. These are arranged by state then by congressional district, and then alphabetically by the first letter of the surname. The lists give name; place of residence; age as of 1 July 1863; occupation; marital status; state, territory, or country of birth; and military service (if any).
Descriptive Rolls. The are arranged the same as the “Consolidated Lists” and include a physical description of the enrollee, birthplace, and whether accepted or rejected for service.

To find a name in the records, you must first determine the congressional district in which your ancestor lived. Congressional district numbers are listed in the following:
“Congressional Directory for the Second Session of the Thirty-eighth Congress of the United States of America”. Washington, D.C.: Philip & Solomons, 1865. (FHL book 973 E4uc 1865; film 1,425,543,item 6.)

There are also some case files on drafted aliens in National Archives Record Group 59, “General Records of the Department of State”. These are alphabetically arranged and include name, age, district from which drafted, country of citizenship, and length of residence in the United States.

Unit Histories

Many state volunteer regiments had published histories. The histories have biographical data on officers and unit rosters of members, and they often provide clues to the town or county where they soldiers were living when they enlisted.

The following source contains organizational and service histories of Union Army regiments:
Dyer, Frederic. “Compendium of the War of the Rebellion”, 2 vols. 1908. Reprint. Dayton, Ohio; The press of Morningside Bookshop, 1978. (FHL book Ref 973 M2df.)
The Family History Library has a large collection of regimental histories. To find specific microfilm numbers with the Family History Library Catalog on microfiche, search the Author/Title section under the name of the author. The library is also in the process of acquiring “Civil War Unit Histories: Regimental Histories and Personal Narratives” on microfiche from University Publications of America. This collection will include the state adjutant general’s office reports and the unit histories and personal narratives published from 1861 to 1920 that listed in Charles E. Dornbusch’s previously mentioned “Military Bibliography of the Civil War”.
A similar collection of 3,000 titles, “Regimental Histories of the American Civil War”, is being microfiched by University Microfilms International (Not at FHL). It too is based on Dornbusch’s Bibliography and includes both Union and Confederate pre-1916 regimental histories, personal narratives, and state adjutant general reports.

.......................to be continued
************************************************************************************ 
Subj: Good site for info 
From: GENESGENE

This is wonderfully spelled out, who,where to write for information on our ancestors. 
Check it out.
CIVIL WAR GENEALOGY 

http://www.erols.com/jreb/genelogy.html

{{Jean}} Good site, thanks for the tip.... :-)
************************************************************************************ 
DID YOU KNOW?? ................................... 
Excerpts taken from "Best Little Stories from the Civil War" by C. Brian Kelly..... 

Both Doubleday and Beauregard would later agree that the first shot fired at Fort Sumter came from a Confederate mortar battery at Rebel-held Fort Johnson. Abner Doubleday was the Union captain of artillery, and General Pierre G.T. Beauregard was, or course, the colorful Confederate commander of Rebel forces gathered at Charleston. Here are their running accounts merged together:

Doubleday: The first shot came from the mortar battery at Fort Johnson. Almost immediately afterward a ball from Cummings Point lodged in the magazine wall.
Beauregard: The peaceful stillness of the night was broken just before dawn. Fort Johnson’s mortar battery, at 4:30 am, April 12, 1861, issued the first and, as many thought, the too-long=deferred signal shell of the war. It sped aloft, describing its peculiar arc of fire and, bursting over Fort Sumter, fell with crashing noise in the very center of the parade.
Doubleday: In a moment the firing burst forth in one continuous roar, and large patches of both the exterior and interior masonry began to crumble and fall in all directions.
Beauregard: Thus was “reveille” sounded in Charleston and tis harbor on this eventful morning.
Doubleday: Nineteen batteries were now hammering at us, and the balls and shells from the 10-inch Columbiads, accompanied by shells from the 13-inch mortars which constantly bombarded us, made us feel that the war had commenced in earnest.
Beauregard: In an instant all was bustle and activity. Not an absentee was reported at roll call. The citizens poured down to the battery and the wharves, and women and children crowded each window of the houses overlooking the sea -- rapt spectators of the scene.
Doubleday: When it was broad daylight, I went down to breakfast. I found the officers already assembled at one of the long tables in the mess hall. Our party was calm and even somewhat merry.
Beauregard: At tem minutes before five o’clock all the batteries and mortars which encircled the grim fortress were in full play against it.
[at Fort Sumter, meanwhile, an unfortunate waiter in the mess hall was visibly terrified. Doubleday noted. The meal itself was “not very sumptuous.” Then came time to respond to the Rebel fire. Doubleday had a historic role at this point.]
Doubleday: In aiming the first gun fired against the Rebellion, I had no feeling of self reproach, for I fully believed that the conflict had been inevitable. My first shot bounded off from the slopping roof of the battery opposite without producing any apparent effect. It seemed useless to attempt to silence the guns there, for our metal was not heavy enough to batter the work down.
[Ashore, Beauregard and his compatriots had been surprised by Sumter’s absolute silence for two hours or more. But, as noted by Doubleday and now by Beauregard, the silence didn’t last.]
Beauregard: At last, however near seven o’clock, the United States flag having previously been raised, the sound of a gun, not ours, was distinctly heard. Sumter had taken up the gage of battle, and Cummings point had first attracted attention.
[Beauregard and his fellow Rebels were almost happy to see Sumter astir and shooting back.]
Beauregard: It was almost a relief to our troops -- for gallantry ever admires gallantry, and a worthy foe disdains one who makes no resistance.

************************************************************************************
A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................ 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................ 
************************************************************************************
From: JRose10700

Jim
You included an amusing anecdote about Abe Lincoln in your current Fireside Chat.
There is an amazing story of Abe and a duel he attempted to avoid -- he probably was dragged into it by his wife -- in the Oct. 1 issue of The Signal, the biweekly newsletter of USIGS, United States Internet Genealogical Society. You can find this story at http://www.usigs.org/signal/signal.htm

There are some other articles of interest in that and back issues which are linked.
And may I also suggest that while you are there you take a look at the Military Collection? This is a library that is only gong to grow biggest and bigger -- it just started a few weeks ago!
And by the way, any links any of your redress may want to add to their Civil War pages are welcome. Find out how to let the librarian know at the site. It is linked to the Signal page.
Joan

{{Joan}} Thanks for the site info :)
*************************************************************************************
From: RAdams505

Thank you for responding to my plea about the GAR! You can probably tell that I am still pretty ignorant about this monster computer. My problem seems to be that I don't know what to ask in order to get an answer. Is the Fireside you referred to a Chat Room? I so, please tell me where/how to access. I tried to find one online but was not successful. I have several this GG/grandfather and several GG/uncles who were in Union Army. I married a Southern Boy and not popular because I can't find any Confederates in my line! 
I am going to be away next week but please leave any info on E-mail and I will respond when I return. 
Again, all my thanks
Rose

{{Rose}} Heh Heh That’s where we all started .... The “Fireside” we refer to is a weekly newsletter we publish. We also use that term as well when we have a lecture in the Chat Room you refer to. We meet every Thursday night at 11pm Eastern time in the Golden Gates Chat Room of the Genealogy Forum. Now here is how you find us. Once you log into AOL, depress the “Ctrl” key and the “K” key at the same time. That will result in navigating you immediately into the “Genealogy Forum”. From that window, click on the button labeled “Chat”. That will move you to the Chat Room window that gives all the selections of Chat Rooms in the Genealogy Forum. We are in the Golden Gates Chat Room on the days I indicated. If you get lost, just send us an email :D
*************************************************************************************
Subj: CSA Muster Rolls And Regimental Histories 
From: Jago6074

Jim: Welcome back from Hurricane Duty!! I spent most of my life in LA, some of it along the coast, so I know that was no fun. Thanks to Jayne for ably filling in. 

I have a question about locating CSA muster rolls and brief regimental and/or company histories online. I had a great grandfather who was in Co A, 53rd AL Mounted Regiment/Cavalry, and a great great grandfather who was in Co C, 31st LA Infantry. The AL unit, also known as Partisan Rangers, does have some info up online, but so far I haven't located a roll of the soldiers. I'm trying to determine if my great great uncle was in the same group, and also what neighbors and/or other relatives may have signed up with these two brothers. The LA group was inside Vicksburg at the time of the siege, and were paroled as prisoners of war after the fall. Would like to know where they were and what other prior engagements they may have been involved in. I'm also curious as to whether a brother in law of that great great grandfather was in this group, as I believe he was a casualty of war. Have not found anything online for the 31st LA but a biography of one man. I've checked the ADAH, and LA archives, but if the info is there it's well hidden.
I am certain there are probably some printed sources in large reference libraries and in the FHC, but chronic health problems make it difficult for me to go to their locations, thus my interest in online info. If you have any suggestions, I would be most appreciative.
Yall keep up the good work!! We do enjoy the "Fireside" and the chat. A truly class act on the internet! Regards, J. J.

{{J.J.}} You warm our hearts with your nice words..... Thank you... :-) We’ll open this up to the membership for advice and please copy me if you respond to J.J. Check out Jim Reynolds’ site, he may address more than just the Texas regiments. I know he is trying to “Hub” with others of like interests. His site is http://home.swbell.net/jamesrey and his email address is jamesrey@swbell.net. The James River Publication site is trying to develop a Hub of Regimental History sites as well. So give them a try as well. Their site address is http://www.erols.com/jreb/civilwar.htm They don’t have a complete set yet, but they’re working on it. Good luck..... 
*************************************************************************************
NEWS FLASH FROM GFS JAYNE.........

This was in today's paper The NewsJournal, Wilmington DE and with all the stories going around about the old cemeteries, I thought I'd pass this one on too...

1,150 LOST SOULS ARE FOUND AT LONG LAST
FORGOTTEN CEMETERY YIELDS MORE GRAVES
By Teresa Candori
Staff Reporter

WILMINGTON -- Every work day, technicians strip off asphalt and four feet of yellowish earth, exposing one darkened patch after another.
Each marks another forgotten soul.
What began last May with the discovery of a few bone fragments at a Christiana Care Health System construction site at 12th and Jefferson streets so far has led to the recovery of 1,150 graves, some of which date to the 1840's. With each new grave that's found, the cost of excavation rises and threatens to top $1 million.
"It's very sad to see," said Mark A. Christian, executive director of Catholic Cemeteries Inc., which has dedicated a section of its All Saints Cemetery for the reinterment of the remains. "I'm glad we'll have the chance, as a cemetery, to see these people finally put to rest in a nice place." 
The forgotten cemetery, once a trash dump, later was paved over as a parking lot. As the workers dig, the graves are identified by the darker earth, the result of topsoil used to fill the graves at burial.
MAAR Associates Inc., a Newark-based consulting company which is conducting the exhumation, is only three-quarters of the way through the one-block site, presiden Ronald A. Thomas said. Christiana Care will have to pay $600 to $700 to excavate each grave.
The bones and a few remaining artifacts, a Civil War medal or a brass coffin plate, tell stories of life a century ago. No record exists of the burials in Old Cathedral Catholic Cemetery or of how many were buried there. Even the existence of the graveyard had been forgotten.
The remains, which range from full skeletons to a few teeth, are being stored in MAAR laboratories, awaiting an arbitrator's decision whether Christiana Care must abide by a 1987 state law requiring it to pay for examination of the bones by a qualified archaeologist. Christiana Care's position is that because the General Assembly authorized the disinterment of the cemetery back in 1953, the company should not be bound by the law.
"At this point, the hospital is working under this law and has complied with this law since day one," state Historic and Cultural Affairs Director Daniel R. Griffith said. 
The arbitrator's decision is expected by the end of October. Smithsonian Institute archaeologist and anthropologist Bruno Frohlich is poised to begin the analysis, should the arbitrator decide it is required. Christiana Care spokeswoman Michele A. Schiavoni said the analysis could cost another $340,000.
Thomas expects he won't finish his excavations until Thanksgiving.
The exhumation process has delayed by at least five months the start of construction of Christiana Care's 38,000-square-foot, same day surgery center.
"The original plan called for construction to be complete in about 12 months," Schiavoni said.
The outpatient surgery facility will cost $6 million to build and another $3.1 million to equip.
A long time ago...
Accurate records are scarce for Old Cathedral Catholic Cemetery.
The diocese officially stopped using the graveyard in 1868, although burials continued into the 1930's.
The church can find no map, not even a list of those lain to rest there, Wilmington Diocese spokesman F. Eugene Donnelly said.
The 1938 survey of grave markers, conducted by the federal Works Progress Administration, found 65 graves. But since entire families often shared a common marker, and the wooden markers in use in the 1800's had long since disintegrated, the number of actual burial could not be determined.
By 1953, people were using the property to dump their trash.
The-Bishop Edmund Fitzmaurice asked the diocese's priests to notify parishioners of plans to close the Old Cathedral Cemetery and sell the property, Donnelly said.
Because better records are kept, and administration of cemeteries is more clearly defined, it's unlikely a cemetery could be abandoned and sold off today, Donnelly and Christian said. And mass disinterment of any cemetery would require a state permit, and no development of property would be allowed unless the remains were removed.
But in 1953, all that was needed was for the General Assembly to authorize the Diocese of Wilmington to re-inter the remains.
At that time, Christian said, the diocese estimated there were 170 graves, some containing the remains of more than one person. About 200 sets of remains were moved.
No one know how at least 1,150 graves were overlooked.
"There isn't anybody around at this point who can answer that," Donnelly siad.
By the time Delaware Hospital bought the property, the lot was "secured by a chain link fence and neatly graded," according to the Dec. 23, 1954, Wilmington Morning News.
"There was no evidence, no physical eveidence, that it had been an active cemetery at any point in time," Christian said.
For the next 43 and a half years, the graves lay forgotten beneath the asphalt.
State law specifically calls for "dignified and respectful" disposition of any human remains discovered in unmarked graves, and outlines the procedure to follow the discovery.
That procedure kicked in on May 18, when construction workers found skull fragments under the pavement.
"It was fortunate that our lawyers, whom we consulted, were familiar with the law," Schiavoni said. Construction stopped and the state Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs was notified.
Stories to tell
The 6-foot chain-link fence around the block is covered with navy-blue fabric, sheilding the work site from prying eyes. Within the blue curtain, there was excitement Thursday morning. A burial gown, more that 100 years old, had been recovered, mostly intact.
A field technician removed the delicate black cotton weave from a plastic Zip-Loc bag and unfolded it. In size, it seemed suitable for an 11 year-old child. 
Wary of the strong wind, he quickly returned the garment to the bag. The gown was discovered just inches from where he was crouching. Less than three feet down, in a pit precisely the shape and size of a hexagonal coffin, lay the one who wore the dress.
What was left of the doffin was only the barest suggestion of wood. Slivers of the metal handles peeked out from the striped loom of earth and clay and rotted wood.
Little more than a partial silhouette of the skeleton was visible; a femur, the two slim shafts of a forearm, the top of a skull and a clump of matted hair, only half-unearthed. He identity maynever be know. The technicians found part of a metal coffin plate with the year of her death, 1884.
Several of these metal plates have been found, some of them with the names of the deceased. Many of them are immigrants, and some of the plates note their home counties in Ireland. 
Thomas said they're finding many stacked coffins, two to a grave. He doesn't know why people were buried this way.
He does have a pretty good idea why a half-dozen graves in the northwest corner of the lot are laid out north-south, rather than east-west like the rest.
"Usually, people are buried so that when they rise up out of the grave on Judgment Day, they're facing the rising sun." he said.
Those buried "sideways" likely died in disgrace, somehow.
The site is drawing some interest.
Already a group of Civil War historians has come forward with the names of a dozen veterans who were buried there. A Civil War medal was unearthed with one of the skeletons, but there's no way to know which of the dozen he was.
When the bones recovered from Old Cathedral have told all they have to tell, they will be laid to rest at All Saints Cemetery at Kirkwood Highway and Wallaston Road. The Diocese of Wilmington has dedicated a section of the cemetery, with room for 2,000 graves, for the re-interment of the recovered remains. 
Before that happens, though, the state will publish a notice about the excavation, listing the names of anyone who's been identified and inviting those who believe their relatives are among the disinterred to claim the remains.
Because the last burial in the cemetery were relatively recent, it's more likely direct descendants will be found, Frohlich said.
"With this cemetery, we're getting a little more closer to modern times," he said, "so we have to be a little more sensitive than if it were 5,000 years old."

The following was a caption next to a picture of several tombstones: Gravestones that date back to the early 1800's lie side by side near the dig site at 12th and Jefferson streets in Wilmington. The dig began in May after construction workers found bone fragments, leading to the discover of an undocumented cemetery. More that 1,000 graves have be recovered to date.

{{{Jayne}}} Great Info....
*************************************************************************************

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate 
one Thursday a month to the sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; 
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, 
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on 
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly 
Fireside." 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from 
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- 
haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFS Jayne and GFS Jim and our many fill-in friends :) 

10/29/98 - "OPEN CHAT"

11/5/98 - "OPEN CHAT"

11/12/98 - "Letters, Songs, and Poems" Night......

11/19/98 - "Border Wars" - GFS Jim "Many have asked for this again so here it is."

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne and GFS Jim

Return to the Weekly Fireside Index

Return to the main page