Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 02 May 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line. 

NOTE from Jayne:  We're getting more subscribers all the time, and  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had recently.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter.

Please be assured your email addresses are not shared with, nor sold to, anyone else.

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NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
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This past Thursday and Friday nights we chatted about the homefront during the Civil War era.  Some recipes were shared, also some ettiquette adivce.

"Spitting is a filthy habit, and annoys one in almost every quarter, in-doors and out. Since vulgarity has had its way so extensively amongst us, every youth begins to smoke and spit before he has well cut his teeth. Smoking is unquestionably so great a pleasure to those accustomed to it, that it must not be condemmed, yet the spitting associated with it detracts very much from the enjoyment. No refined person will spit where ladies are present, or in any public promenade; the habit is disgusting in the extreme, and one would almost wish that it could be checked in public by means of law."

Join us some Thursday or Friday night and get in on the fun.  We have plenty of places to sit around the Fireside and warm cider for everyone. 

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MUSIC
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If you have some favorite music, tell us a little about it and we'll put it here in the newsletter.

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
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OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well. 

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  Let us help you find your soldier.  Tell us their stories.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to. 

You can visit the other Genealogy chats (AOL only) by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

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"THE BOOK SHELF"
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If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.  

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--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs,
and Poems evenings)
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WILLIAM BLACK
Co, B - 55th Illinois
This sure ain’t what I thought
Bein’ a soldier was gonna be.
Sure I knew there’d be lots a marchin’
But I’d followed the plow for years.
I even knew the food wouldn’t be the best,
But ma had died when I was just ten.
Sleepin’ in tents wouldn’t be too bad
As long as there were blankets to keep me warm.
I knew there’d be shootin’ and killin’.
Shootin’ and killin’ -
That’s what a soldier’s s’posed to do.
I was prepared for death
To be at my stoop any time.
But I sure didn’t think,
Back in Chicago when I joined up,
That I’d ever be told, by my own Colonel,
To kill one of our own men
Simply because he went home
To be with his wife
When she buried their baby boy.

By Frank Crawford

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THE HELP DESK
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Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom?? 
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

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Weekly Web Sites we've received
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If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

From:  Cyndi's List of new websites

URL:     http://www.fairfaxrifles.org
TITLE:     17th Virginia Infantry, Co. D, "Fairfax Rifles"
DESCRIPTION:     Re-enactors based in historic Fairfax Court House, Va.
representing Northern Virginia Confederates.

=~=~=~=
URL:     http://cwpublishing.com/
TITLE:     cwpublishing
DESCRIPTION:     Old Hickory - The Autobiography of Horace Hopkins Shaw.

=~=~=~=

URL:     http://mysite.verizon.net/ingallsa/Diary/jrnlintro.htm
TITLE:     Civil War Journal  of Herbert E. COTES of New Woodstock, Madison
County, NY
DESCRIPTION:     The Civil War Journal of Herbert E. Cotes of New
Woodstock, Madison County, NY, Apr 19, 1862­Sept 16, 1862Eighth Regiment
Kansas Volunteers - Company I.

=~=~=~=
URL:     http://www.amerindgen.com/index.html
TITLE:     American Indian Genealogy Help Center
DESCRIPTION:     Native American Indian help for all tribes for beginners
and experienced researchers.

=~=~=~=
URL:     http://www.voy.com/105263/
TITLE:     American Indian Genealogy Message Board
DESCRIPTION:     Queries related to Native American Indian genealogy
answered by an accredited genealogist.

=~=~=~=

From:  JRose

THE DECATUR DAILY, Decatur, Alabama, Sunday, April 25, 2004

Granddaughter finds Civil War private buried in Mississippi

By Deangelo McDaniel , DAILY Staff Writer

LANDERSVILLE The tears overflowed her hazel eyes and rolled down her face like a flooded stream.

She pulled her glasses off, reached over, touched the tombstone, and in a  low voice said, "It's going to be all right. Your daddy loved you."

Every time Sunni Evan Montgomery talked about Civil War soldier Stephen  Little, she cried. She was especially emotional when she sat next to the grave marker of Juley Ales Montgomery and talked about Little.

Juley Montgomery was Little's only daughter. She was an infant when he left her to defend the Confederacy. He never came home.

The details of his death are unknown, but military records support  Montgomery's belief that Little was killed in a skirmish near Brown's  Plantation in Mississippi almost one year after he joined the Confederate  Army.

To read the rest of the story go to:
-----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.decaturdaily.com/decaturdaily/news/040425/grave.shtml

=~=~=~=

From:  An Madra Rua

First Search [OCLC - Reference
http://www.oclc.org/firstsearch/

FirstSearch is an online service that gives library professionals and end users access to a rich collection of reference databases. With FirstSearch, materials in your library’s collection are highlighted in results from searches in dozens of leading databases.

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FROM OUR READERS
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If your ancestor has or you have a story to tell, please send it to us. 
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill  
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com
  

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From:  An Madra Rua

This is my source:  http://dcwl.com/~dave/underwood.html

PART 4....... March 1865

Albert Underwood Civil War Diary

Wed. March 16: Quite chilly morning, are running up the Red river. Reached Alexandria at 4 oclock, very crooked river, narrow and deep. The infantry all went ashore, we took off all our horses and put them in a large stable. The Rebs evacuated at our approach leaving a lot of corn and other things behind. Lt Col. Cravens and I took a walk up town, quite nice place. There are no fortifications here of any importance at all. Town rather new.
Thurs. March 17: Beautiful day. Alexandria is a nice town and is the seat of Justice of Rapides Parish. The town is quite level. I walked up through town again today. Three pieces of artillery were found near here today and brought in. There is a large number of hogsheads of good sugar here, considerable cotton was found here and is being loaded on the marine and gunboats. The Rebs had a half dozen more transports here, they burnt their ferry boat.
Fri. March 18: Very pleasant today. Still laying up yet waiting for the river to rise, or something else, I don't know what. The river is rising slowly. Foraging parties are sent out every day, bringing in cattle, hogs, sheep and many other things of value. Gen. Smith and 5 boats came up this evening. They blowed up Ft. DeRusy before they left. Beautiful level country here. Pineville, where the military Academy was, is 2 miles from here.
Sat. March 19: Rather warm and has the appearance of rain today. Some of Bank's Cavalry advanced come in this morning. I took a ride through town today. Nothing of interest has transpired today other than the LAUREL HILL has arrived from New Orleans this evening bringing the most of Gen. Bank's staff officers, Gen. Leen, Chief of Cavalry, Gen. Arnold, Chief of Artillery, Gen Stone, Chief of Staff. Rained this evening, cavalry division arrived.
Sun. March 20: Rained this morning. I took a ride up town this morning and saw Bank's 1st Division of cavalry coming in. It has remained cloudy all day but has not rained but little. Feel unwell today. A mail was sent out today. We are expecting Bank's forces to arrive now every day. A brigade of the 16th Army Corp is on the other side of the river bayou Rapides north of town.

Mon. March 21: A reconnoitering force was ordered out this morning. We unloaded our battery before day. Rained this morning and quite disagreeable. We started out just after daylight up the bayou rapids in a northwest direction, made a forced march to Pino Hill. There was some skirmishing, formed in line of battle twice. Our cavalry surprised and captured four pieces of artillery and 250 prisoners about midnight with a lot of ammunition, horses and equipment.
Tues. March 22: Rained considerable and was very disagreeable last night. We went up this morning after the captured guns. Crossed the bayou, found a strong natural fortification on a high hill with a wide levee bottom on the south and east. Started back about 11 oclock with 4 pieces captured artillery, 250 prisoners, about 200 horses and equipment. We went into camp at 5 oclock in 9 miles of Alexandria. We were out about 28 miles, a beautiful country all the way out.
Wed. March 23: Left camp at 7 oclock. Had good roads and reached Alexandria about 11 oclock. Found a Negro Brigade had come in from Port Hudson. The LIMINANRY came up this morning from New Orleans. We took our old quarters on the CHOUTEAU. My knapsack and all my clothes, writing and other valuables were stolen while I was gone on the reconnaissance. River still on the rise. We have not put our Battery on the boat yet.
Thurs. March 24: Cloudy and cool this morning. Rained though the day and was very disagreeable, loaded our battery in the afternoon. The BLACKHAWK came up this evening, the MESTEAS yesterday and the LaUrel HILL came up about 10 oclock in the night. We received orders to unload our battery about 10 oclock in the night but the order was countermanded in an hour afterwards. Gen. Banks came up on the BLACKHAWK this evening.
Fri. March 25: The boats dropped down this morning to wood. Part of Gen Banks' force came in today. The 1st Indiana Heavy Artillery came with them. I saw Dan and the other boys. Boats returned in the evening and we unloaded after dark with orders to start at 6 oclock in the morning and go up the river 30 miles to embark. The LaCrosse came up from Vicksburg this morning.
Sat. March 26: Left Alexandria about 9 oclock. Gen. Banks' force is not going this morning. Very good roads and beautiful weather. Traveled through a beautiful level countryside all the way up the bayou Rapides. Turned off the road 1/2 mile to the left and camped along the bayou in about 18 miles of Alexandria, close by a nice plantation house, found plenty of forage for our horses tonight.
Sun. March 27: Left camp at 8 1/2 oclock. Passed along where we were the night of the capture of Pine Hill. Passed up the bayou by a large dirt dam and down another bayou or creek and went into camp near the river about 1 oclock. The boats were to come up here and we were to embark again and go up the river. The boats are not here yet. Gen. Banks' Cavalry Division is camped near here, also some artillery.
Mon. March 28: Rained last night and is very muddy and disagreeable this morning. I took a walk up the river to the cavalry camp this evening and saw my friend Christie, now in the 1st Mo. Battery. Some of the boats are getting up this evening, quite nice weather here this evening. The river banks are high and steep here and the river is very crooked. Very nice country round here.
Tues. March 29: The boats are nearly all here this morning. We harnessed and moved down to the boat about noon. Our boat dropped down about a mile to forage and got back about dark when we got orders to load our guns, but it was so dark and the banks so steep we abandoned the idea of loading till morning. Beautiful weather. The pine and bluffs set in here and extend up the river. Some swampy country here.
Wed. March 30: Commenced loading before daylight and finished soon after sunup. The 89th Regt. came aboard about 2 oclock and we shoved off down the river about a mile for wood and some forage and remained all night. Banks' force camped 4 miles south of here last night, his transports have not arrived here yet. Beautiful weather. I am getting tired waiting for the expedition to move.
Thurs. March 31: Dropped down to our old landing this morning and all our infantry went ashore. We took our horses ashore this morning and have remained here all day. It would take a Philadelphia lawyer to tell what kind of maneuvers this expedition is making and what it is going to do. Foraging parties are sent out every day. We receive no news at this place.

Continued next week.................

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From:  Wmdperkins

The following was sent to me by Wmd, and for the subject, he had  "found this very interesting and moving."   To read the whole thing you can go to  The Last Salute Of The Army Of Northern Virginia
http://www.civilwarhome.com/chamberlainsurrender.htm

US Army General Joshua Chamberlain tells what happened at Appomattox, you can see the respect that the Union troops (the Yankees) had for the Confederate troops.  So, in his words:

"Having thus formed, the brigades standing at 'order arms,' the head of the Confederate column, General Gordon in command, and the old 'Stonewall' Jackson Brigade leading, started down into the valley which lay between us, and approached our lines. With my staff I was on the extreme right of the line, mounted on horseback, and in a position nearest the Rebel solders who were approaching our right.
       "Ah, but it was a most impressive sight, a most striking picture, to see that whole army in motion to lay down the symbols of war and strife, that army which had fought for four terrible years after a fashion but infrequently known in war.
       "At such a time and under such conditions I thought it eminently fitting to show some token of our feeling, and I therefore instructed my subordinate officers to come to the position of 'salute' in the manual of arms as each body of the Confederates passed before us.
       "It was not a 'present arms,' however, not a 'present,' which then as now was the highest possible honor to be paid even to a president. It was the 'carry arms,' as it was then known, with musket held by the right hand and perpendicular to the shoulder. I may best describe it as a marching salute in review.
       "When General Gordon came opposite me I had the bugle blown and the entire line came to 'attention,' preparatory to executing this movement of the manual successively and by regiments as Gordon's columns should pass before our front, each in turn.
       "The General was riding in advance of his troops, his chin drooped to his breast, downhearted and dejected in appearance almost beyond description. At the sound of that machine like snap of arms, however, General Gordon started, caught in a moment its significance, and instantly assumed the finest attitude of a soldier. He wheeled his horse facing me, touching him gently with the spur, so that the animal slightly reared, and as he wheeled, horse and rider made one motion, the horse's head swung down with a graceful bow, and General Gordon dropped his swordpoint to his toe in salutation.
       "By word of mouth General Gordon sent back orders to the rear that his own troops take the same position of the manual in the march past as did our line. That was done, and a truly imposing sight was the mutual salutation and farewell.
       "At a distance of possibly twelve feet from our line, the Confederates halted and turned face towards us. Their lines were formed with the greatest care, with every officer in his appointed position, and thereupon began the formality of surrender.
       "Bayonets were affixed to muskets, arms stacked, and cartridge boxes unslung and hung upon the stacks. Then, slowly and with a reluctance that was appealingly pathetic, the torn and tattered battleflags were either leaned against the stacks or laid upon the ground. The emotion of the conquered soldiery was really sad to witness. Some of the men who had carried and followed those ragged standards through the four long years of strife, rushed, regardless of all discipline, from the ranks, bent about their old flags, and pressed them to their lips with burning tears.
       "And it can well be imagined, too, that there was no lack of emotion on our side, but the Union men were held steady in their lines, without the least show of demonstration by word or by motion. There was, though, a twitching of the muscles of their faces, and, be it said, their battle-bronzed cheeks were not altogether dry. Our men felt the import of the occasion, and realized fully how they would have been affected if defeat and surrender had been their lot after such a fearful struggle.
       "Nearly an entire day was necessary for that vast parade to pass. About 27,000 stands of arms were laid down, with something like a hundred battleflags; cartridges were destroyed, and the arms loaded on cars and sent off to Wilmington.
       "Every token of armed hostility was laid aside by the defeated men. No officer surrendered his side arms or horse, if private property, only Confederate property being required, according to the terms of surrender, dated April 9, 1865, and stating that all arms, artillery, and public property were to be packed and stacked and turned over to the officer duly appointed to receive them."

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
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If you have a resource from which you would be willing to do look-ups for folks, please let us know and we'll add it here

GoldHobo@aol.com has told us if anyone wants info the the 85th NY Inf. Regt. (Plymouth Pilgrims) you may email her.  She has a book about them.    Her one request is that you put 85th Regt. in the subject line so she doesn't delete it by mistake

JLawson656@aol.com has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email.

GandMS@aol.com  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you.

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin/frye@gnat.net  does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com  Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com

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"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
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If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html

May 7 - 9  Reenactment, Battle of Spotsylvania 140th anniversary event in Spotsylvania County near Fredericksburg. Demonstrations and living history all weekend. Camps open 1 pm Friday, 10 am Saturday and before dawn Sunday. Battles at 6:30 pm Saturday, before dawn and 11 am Sunday. Candlelight tour Saturday night. Fee charged. http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/news.html#SpotsylvaniaSchedule
Details and updates: www.spotsylvania140th.com

May 8 - 9 Gettysburg, PA    Living history encampment and demonstrations by a US Artillery unit at the Pennsylvania Memorial in the Gettysburg National Military Park. www.nps.gov/gett  or 717-334-1124 extension 422.    

May 14-16, Virginia - Reenactment, 140th anniversary of the Battle of New Market on the historic battlefield. Information: www.vmi.edu/museum/nm or 540-740-3101. For schedule,  http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/news.html#newmkt2004 

May 22 - 23  Virginia -  Reenactment, living history and 140th anniversary commemoration of the Battle of Wilson's Wharf (Fort Pocahontas) at the James River near Sherwood Forest Plantation off Route 5 between Richmond and Williamsburg. Details: www.fortpocahontas.org    
   
May 22 - 23     West Virginia - Living history and reenactment, "The Battle of Lewisburg" on the Greenbrier campus of the New River Community & Technical College in Lewisburg. Camps open 10 am-8 pm Saturday with speakers, exhibits, and battle reenactment. Dance (all welcome) 8 pm Saturday. Speakers, living history begin noon Sunday with a funeral cortege for an officer killed in battle beginning at 3 pm followed by a ceremony at the Confederate cemetery. All free. www.battleoflewisburg.org.    
   
May 31, Gettysburg, PA  - Memorial Day Parade and Ceremonies at the Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg. 2 pm. 717-334-1124, extension 422 or 431 or www.nps.gov/gett .    

Sat. June 5 & Sun., June 6  Pennypacker Mills, Schwenksville, PA  Civil War Reunion Weekend  A must-see experience for the entire family as you emerge yourselves into the Civil War era to see an authentic military encampment, period music and fashion, guest speakers, living history demonstrations, sutlers, artillery, and battle scenes.  Ongoing activities both days.  On-site parking and refreshments available.  No pets, please.  Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  No charge.      

JULY 17 & 18, Lancaster PA, Landis Valley: A Civil War Village
Take an unusual glimpse into history when you visit a Civil War-era Pennsylvania Dutch village that has been taken over by Union Troops. Hundreds of authentically dressed civilian and military re-enactors recreate a slice of 1860s life. Several informative seminars are offered both days. Books and other merchandise of special interest to Civil War buffs will be available at The Weathervane, Landis Valley Museum Store. Admission fee. Museum members admitted free.  Saturday & Sunday  10:00AM - 5:00PM

September 3 - 5, 2004 New Jersey.....  Battle of Cedar Bridge, Lake Manahawkin, NJ     Last Battle of the American War of Independence
http://www.telecottage.com/staffordhist/cedarbridge.html

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Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
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Time:  
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

May 6 & 7, 2004 - OPEN CHAT - This is the time to bring your Civil War related questions, whether it's about the war or the people at home, maybe an ancestor we might help you find...  bring it to us and allow us to help you.

May 13 & 14, 2004 - Our Special Songs, Letters, and Poems nights.  If you have something you would like to share, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne or HOST FMLY Bill.

May 20 & 21, 2004 - OPEN CHAT 

May 27 & 28 - to be announced

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night. 

Jayne & Bill  :)
Civil War Weekly Fireside Newsletter
http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/weekly_fireside_newsletter_archive.htm

Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 09 May 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line. 

NOTE from Jayne:  We're getting more subscribers all the time, and  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had recently.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter.

Please be assured your email addresses are not shared with, nor sold to, anyone else.

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NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
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We had a fun two nights in our Open Chats last week..  This week brings us our special Songs, letters and Poem nights.   Do you have a letter, exerpts from a diary, favorite Civil War song or poem?  Send them to us and we'll read them in the room. 

Join us some Thursday or Friday night and get in on the fun.  We have plenty of places to sit around the Fireside and warm cider for everyone. 

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MUSIC
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If you have some favorite music, tell us a little about it and we'll put it here in the newsletter.

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well. 

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  Let us help you find your soldier.  Tell us their stories.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to. 

You can visit the other Genealogy chats (AOL only) by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

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"THE BOOK SHELF"
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If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.  

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Some of you probably subscribe to the CIVIL-WAR-L@rootsweb.com mail list and may have read this.  I asked Mr. Harding for permission to include it here in our newsletter and he very graciously gave it.  While this is not about a specific book, I think it appropriate for this section.

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Like other members of the list, I have a large home library with books on the War, and needless to say, I do a lot of reading and studying on the War.  Yes, the authors often tend to write the books according to their views on the War, and most times, you have to take a lot of the material with a grain of salt and read between the lines.

One must remember that history, no matter what time period, is written by the Victors, so naturally, the majority of the books I've read have been slanted a bit toward the North and the Union.  The few older books that were written prior to the Political Correctness movement that are pro South tend to give good histories, and that's why I like older books, especially ones written from the turn of the century to around 1960.  Memoirs, letters, and diaries are also good reading as they are our history and written by the men who actually participated in the War, and yes, many can be biased, where the writer tries to make himself look good.  I noted this in the memoirs that my own Great-Great Grandfather wrote before his death in 1890.  But we have to remember these men were there, participated in this terrible War, and what they wrote gives a much better and first hand perspective of things that happened to them personally.  Although my Great-Great Grandfather served in the Confederacy, he settled here in eastern North Carolina after many years at sea, plus, he was an immigrant.....he was German.  I've found some discrepancies in his writing, but overall, he did an excellent job.  I also have letters written home by another ancestor, of which I've posted some to the list before he was finally killed in action.  You can see the hardships, the struggles, etc. that each of them experienced and it helps one to know more what things were really like back then. It seems the worst thing our present day writers do is to try and compare the men they're lives,  and the laws from that time by our present day standards and laws.....and it's like comparing apples to oranges.

My main point in this posting is to say you can't take one author's word and book as Gospel.  The more you read from all sources, being biased toward the North and South, is something we have to contend with to form our own opinions.  A few things you can notice in writings are names of battles to tell if the writing is slanted toward the North or South.  Union armies lived by maps, while the Confederates were at home in their own terrain.  Federals often named battles for nearby streams or bodies of water, while he Confederates used the names of towns.  A few examples are:

Federal                          Confederate
Bull Run                         Manassas
Antietam (Creek)            Sharpsburg
Stone's River                  Murfreesboro
Fair Oaks                      Seven Pines
Elkhorn Tavern               Pea Ridge

I've found that in recent years, especially since 1990, when the Politically Correct writing really started, there has been too much "interpretation" of what happened by the authors and not what actually DID happen.  Since this began, we've seen more books written and published giving a Southern point of view to counteract the books with a Northern bias.  The main thing everyone needs to know is to read it all, then form their own opinion.  Not many have the time to sit down and read from cover to cover all the volumes of the Official Records, but they are indeed a good source containing both quotes, etc. from the Union point of view and the Southern point of view.  History is just that, it's something that happened in the past, and we can neither rewrite it, revise it, or change it.  And the best way to learn it is to find books with documented facts.....that's what counts.

This past weekend while in Plymouth, NC at the Living History Weekend, I had a young girl of about 8 or 9 years old and her father talk to me.  They were Southern, in period dress (the father was in a Union uniform), and the young girl said something that really bothered me, so I had her sit down and patiently explained a lot of documented facts to her about the War.  Although the young girl was of Southern Heritage, I was most surprised when she told me the Confederates were the "bad guys"  and also went on to tell me the War was fought for the sole purpose to free the slaves.  I began to ask her why she said that, and the only answer she would give (like a young child does) was "because."  I asked her again and for the second time received the same answer.  I finally told her "because" wasn't a good answer, and asked her to explain to me why she said that.   It didn't surprise me much when she answered "Because my teacher said so."  I did my best to explain about the tariffs imposed on the South and how the South was funding almost 95% of the Federal budget with practically all of the money staying in the Northern States.  She became very interested then, but finally asked me about the Emancipation Proclamation that "freed all the slaves."  I explained the purpose of the document to her, telling her it was actually a political ploy to help keep England and France out of the War, and also was done to hopefully start a slave insurrection, which didn't happen.  I also explained how it supposedly freed all slaves in areas of rebellion which the Federal Government had no jurisdiction in at that time, but it freed no slaves in Union slave holding States.  Then I went on to explain to her about U.S. Grant, and how he kept his slaves until after the War when the 13th Amendment forced him to free his slaves.  I went on and taught her a bit more, and she told me I needed to teach her teacher about the War.  It's a shame the history books in our schools do such a poor job teaching our future generations what happened, but it's also a shame the eachers are told what and how to teach about the War.  I asked the little girl if she liked to read, and when she said yes, I wrote down the titles of a number of books for her to find, and explained that you just can't go by the abbreviated version of history taught in schools today.  Her father was most appreciative and I did have to chuckle when he told her "I'm dressed in blue today because they needed some more Yankees."  If nothing else, I sparked an interest in this young girl's mind to want to learn more about the War from books with factual and documented information.  I can say, if that's they only thing I accomplished during the weekend, it was well worth it.  I certainly appreciated the compliment her father gave me too....telling me he wished I could give more talks to school classes to help better educate our youth about this time in history.

I apologize if I have talked too much about all of this, but just wanted to share my sentiments about the ways books are done now and how the War is taught in our public schools.  I just feel we need to remember history is history, and no matter how much our modern day authors try to interpret it and revise it, it's still history and can't be changed.  We, as adults must learn to help teach our future generations the truth and the whole truth, the good and the bad, so this time in our country's history will stay intact and taught as it should be.  No matter what time period in history, we just have to dig deep and learn all the facts we can.  One can not learn history from one book alone.....we must use our God given brains to sort though it all to insure we learn history, the facts, no matter what time period if
was.

Edward
http://ehardingwbtsancestors.homestead.com/Index.html

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--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs,
and Poems evenings)
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An Madra Rua found the following on the Valley of the Shadow website

Frederick
Nov. 11th, 1857
My Dear Aunt

   As soon as possible, after the great occasion, I have seated myself to give you some account of what has passed. You know Mittie Tyler was here about two weeks before the wedding, so that, she and Lizzie Law, became like old friends, indeed they seemed to take to each other directly, tho' they are so different. Mittie is so unselfish & always like a bird -- she falls asleep with a smile on her countenance. On Friday last, the three brides maids from Georgetown came & you may suppose six girls made a merry house. The day before they came Lizzie Tyler's spirits began to give way. She did not seem to realize her leaving home until she had most of her things packed. then she gave way to her feelings. After the girls came however, she rallied again, & with Jane & Bettie added to them, there was no chance for low spirits. We gave up the two rooms on the second floor to them, three in each room, & I wish you could have been here to enjoy their merry laughs--On Monday might, the groom & groomsmen, seven in number arrived & after they had made their toilet at the Hotel, they all came up here. But before they came themselves, they sent a basket with the bridal presents from the groomsmen, all silver. These with those from their friends were 33 in number & nearly all silver. I will name them in another place. The girls were all dressed to receive them. Lizzie Law all anxiety to see her "Cousin Ned." And she was greatly pleased with him. They went through the performance once or twice for fear of mistakes. The first brides maid was to be the tallest--that was Jane [unclear: Burgh] next Miss Harry, then Lizzie Law, then Miss Berry, then Miss Marberry & last Bettie. They sent the beaux all away before ten o'clock, that they might retire early. Next morning, the wedding day, we had to stir ourselves.- Directly after breakfast the girls arranged the presents on the piano & fixed the Bride's cake in one Corner & the Fruit cake in another, both beautifully done. Then we all dispersed to our rooms to arrange ourselves for the great occasion, while Mary Polly & the servants fixed the dinner table which was very nice, but everything was cold, as all had to be done in a hurry to be ready for the cars.-- The girls [illeg.] themselves greatly at Kitty who was dressed in a black silk with three flounces the height of her ambition. The bride wore a brown merino travelling dress & the brides maids , nearly the same. All the connexions of the families soon invited with all Lizzie's young friends, & no married or older persons but Dr. & Mrs. Dorsey, E. Potts & C. Reynolds, & the parents of the attendants.- Nearly all in town, invited came & the parlours were filled. Our new Minister Mr. Ross, performed the ceremony, which all pronounced very simple & beautiful. The whole bridal party behaved admirably & every body said it was the most pleasant wedding they ever attended. every one was so bright & joyous. Kitty behaved very well too. They all dispersed soon after twelve, that the party might have time to dine. 21 persons dined here besides our own household, & afterwards several of the coloured friends. Soon after, the hacks, five in number, were at the door & they all went off in high glee. Several ladies & gentlemen from here went to the junction with them. The groomsmen were the handsomest set of young men I ever saw. Lizzie Law served with French Bowie a cousin of Mary Tyler's & very handsome.

    To night, Wednesday, they have a grand reception at Miss Williams & I would love to take a peep at them. The Bride's dress is a white striped brocade satin, & the attendants white silk, & they are all rather pretty. All regretted so much Edward was not here & that the Dr. & Kate did not come. I was not able to write to her last week as I wished, but will, soon-- She would have enjoyed it so much. We were truly sorry to hear you had been so unwell & Uncle so feeble. Many persons here are sick with colds. You may imagine how lonely we feel with an almost empty house. Kitty is to day feeling the effects of all the excitement & is not well to night . I will name over the presents but not all the donors as I have not time. A most beautiful cake basket from Mrs. Williams, an elegant set of Castors from Jane Bungh & splendid silver salt cellars lined with gold from Bettie, there were three pairs of salt cellars lined with gold & spoons to suit our dozen of silver knives with pearl handles, & half a dozen all silver. A very large & heavy soup ladle & a dozen of teaspoons. two pairs of butter knives & one single one. Four fluted sugar spoons line with gold, two pair of exquisite fruit spoons about the size of table spoons, one pair all silver & richly figured, the other lined with gold & carved. A large & handsome silver fish knife. A very heavy silver affair for salad & two silver napkin rings, a beautiful silver pie trowel to lift the pie when cut. a gold bracelet from Lizzie Law & a black lace head dress from her Mother E Mchaffey a handsome worked pocket handkerchief the shawl I knit her & a pair of fluted salt spoons from John. I ought to have mentioned first, the elegant gold watch & chain from Mr. Williams & a beautiful chinese fan from one of the bridesmaids, & a pickle knife & fork, silver-- & a Bible from her Aunt Mary covered with green velvet & she is to get a double set of forks from Gen. Coale her father's friend, but this is a secret yet -- she does not know it. I believe I have named all-- The Gen. intended to give her a watch; but as he saw she had one & no forks, he changed his plan.

   The bride & groom with Lizzie Law, Jane & Bettie expect to go to P. George's before the weather becomes very cold. I hope they will, I want Mrs Tyler to know Lizzie so much. All expect such pleasure in showing the lions of Washington to her, as she has never been there before. You can see that I have written in a hurry just what came first in my mind as I was writing -- so I hope you will excuse all defects for I am sure it must have many. My effort has been to give you a minute account of every thing & I hope this will find you well enough to enjoy it. I wish I could see you to tell all, it could be more easily done. We are too sorry Ed. could not come, feeling so sure he would have enjoyed it mightily. Let us hear from you soon. Some of the guests were so greedy, that there was scarcely a bit of cake left, though one weighed 16 lbs. & the other heavier. We had not a piece to give to the servants & Kitty & myself did not get a taste even. The cold dinner consisted of Turkey, roast beef, ham, tongues & pickled oysters, olio, slaw & cold tomatoes, bread & butter & all kind of pickles, also celery. They all seemed to enjoy it mightily.-- But I must stop.-- All unite in much love to you Uncle & Ed-- Mine to all friends.

Ever yours, affect.

E

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THE HELP DESK
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Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom?? 
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

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Weekly Web Sites we've received
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If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

From:  An Madra Rua
The Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War
http://valley.vcdh.virginia.edu/choosepart.html


From:  Civil War POW
Red Skelton's Pledge to the Flag
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/RedsPledge.html


From:  Maryd0318
December 1999 - Cogswell Family Association
http://www.cogswell.org/Prom_1299.htm
Mary suggested that we look at the entry on Harvey Cogswell.  An interesting fact that he served 4 days in the Confederate Army and was deemed more important to serve as a Civilian printer to the cause and was kept on the roster, however, till the end of the war.

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FROM OUR READERS
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If your ancestor has or you have a story to tell, please send it to us. 
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill  
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com  

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From:  An Madra Rua

This is my source:  http://dcwl.com/~dave/underwood.html

PART 4....... March 1865

Albert Underwood Civil War Diary

Fri. Apr. 1: Cool and windy this morning. There are no sign of moving this morning yet. The LIMINARY and the MESTEAS came up this evening, brought some New Orleans papers but no letters. The LaCrosse was captured and burned below Alexandria. The WOODFORD sunk at the rapids. The ROB ROY came up about sundown with four of 1st Indiana Heavy Artillery guns on board, the other went by land.
Fri. Apr. 2: We brought our horses on board this morning. Some of the boats started about noon. The ROB ROY left at 5 oclock this morning. We shoved off at 2 1/2 oclock up the river. Passed a very narrow chain bridge of hard earth approaching to rock, also passed Calhoun. Quite crooked river and nice country along the river. Considerable pine along the river. We tied up for the night a little after dark a few miles below Montgomery. Warm today.
Sat. Apr. 3: Started about sunrise this morning. Progressed very slowly on account of the river being so narrow and crooked. We stuck several times, once a little after noon and did not get off until after near night. Several other boats stuck at the same bend. Passed Montgomery and tied up for the night a little after dark and received orders to unload at 6 oclock in the morning.
Mon. Apr. 4: Reveille was sounded at 5 oclock this morning. Commenced unloading about 6 oclock. We got our horses all off and received orders to await further orders. Scouting parties of infantry and cavalry was sent out this morning and returned in the evening. We remained here all day waiting orders. The infantry are out drilling today. Quite nice country round here. The river is nice here and runs about due south for a mile or more.
Tues. Apr. 5: Beautiful morning, still waiting orders. Daniel and George Deveter came up this morning. They are camped near Natchitoches 5 miles from here. We are still lying here between Grand Ecote and Compti about 2 miles above Quantico. The transport UNIVERSE from New Orleans came up today, brought us no mail. A scout was sent out again today but found no enemy. Bank's cavalry has captured several prisoners.
Wed. Apr. 6: I was wakened up this morning at 5 oclock with orders to feed and harness and move at 6 oclock. We unloaded our guns and moved onto the bluff when the order was countermanded, but hold ourselves in readiness to move at any moment. So we had a little drill this morning. Our boat is going back to Alexandria with the sick. We have orders to move in the morning.
Thurs. Apr. 7: Left camp at 7 oclock, passed Grandoore and traveled south and west today. Rained considerable today. The roads were very bad and all the way through the pine timber. Stalled two or three times today and had other bad luck, also crossed no streams, but some small lakes. The richest that grows is along here. Went into camp 4 1/2 oclock after marching about 14 miles. Passed no farms today.

Continued next week.................

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
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If you have a resource from which you would be willing to do look-ups for folks, please let us know and we'll add it here.

NEW!!!!!    eharding2@cox.net has offered to do lookups for folks with ancestors from the Confederacy, focusing mainly on North Carolina, but has other sources also.  

GoldHobo@aol.com has told us if anyone wants info the the 85th NY Inf. Regt. (Plymouth Pilgrims) you may email her.  She has a book about them.    Her one request is that you put 85th Regt. in the subject line so she doesn't delete it by mistake

JLawson656@aol.com has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email.

GandMS@aol.com  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you.

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin/frye@gnat.net  does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com  Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

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"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
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If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html

May 7 - 9  Reenactment, Battle of Spotsylvania 140th anniversary event in Spotsylvania County near Fredericksburg. Demonstrations and living history all weekend. Camps open 1 pm Friday, 10 am Saturday and before dawn Sunday. Battles at 6:30 pm Saturday, before dawn and 11 am Sunday. Candlelight tour Saturday night. Fee charged. http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/news.html#SpotsylvaniaSchedule
Details and updates: www.spotsylvania140th.com

May 8 - 9 Gettysburg, PA Living history encampment and demonstrations by a US Artillery unit at the Pennsylvania Memorial in the Gettysburg National Military Park. www.nps.gov/gett  or 717-334-1124 extension 422.

May 14-16, Virginia - Reenactment, 140th anniversary of the Battle of New Market on the historic battlefield. Information: www.vmi.edu/museum/nm or 540-740-3101. For schedule,  http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/news.html#newmkt2004 

May 22 - 23  Virginia -  Reenactment, living history and 140th anniversary commemoration of the Battle of Wilson's Wharf (Fort Pocahontas) at the James River near Sherwood Forest Plantation off Route 5 between Richmond and Williamsburg. Details: www.fortpocahontas.org

May 22 - 23 West Virginia - Living history and reenactment, "The Battle of Lewisburg" on the Greenbrier campus of the New River Community & Technical College in Lewisburg. Camps open 10 am-8 pm Saturday with speakers, exhibits, and battle reenactment. Dance (all welcome) 8 pm Saturday. Speakers, living history begin noon Sunday with a funeral cortege for an officer killed in battle beginning at 3 pm followed by a ceremony at the Confederate cemetery. All free. www.battleoflewisburg.org.

May 31, Gettysburg, PA  - Memorial Day Parade and Ceremonies at the Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg. 2 pm. 717-334-1124, extension 422 or 431 or www.nps.gov/gett .

Sat. June 5 & Sun., June 6  Pennypacker Mills, Schwenksville, PA  Civil War Reunion Weekend  A must-see experience for the entire family as you emerge yourselves into the Civil War era to see an authentic military encampment, period music and fashion, guest speakers, living history demonstrations, sutlers, artillery, and battle scenes.  Ongoing activities both days.  On-site parking and refreshments available.  No pets, please.  Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  No charge.  

JULY 17 & 18, Lancaster PA, Landis Valley: A Civil War Village
Take an unusual glimpse into history when you visit a Civil War-era Pennsylvania Dutch village that has been taken over by Union Troops. Hundreds of authentically dressed civilian and military re-enactors recreate a slice of 1860s life. Several informative seminars are offered both days. Books and other merchandise of special interest to Civil War buffs will be available at The Weathervane, Landis Valley Museum Store. Admission fee. Museum members admitted free.  Saturday & Sunday  10:00AM - 5:00PM

September 3 - 5, 2004 New Jersey.....  Battle of Cedar Bridge, Lake Manahawkin, NJ     Last Battle of the American War of Independence
http://www.telecottage.com/staffordhist/cedarbridge.html

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Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
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Time:  
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

May 6 & 7, 2004 - OPEN CHAT - This is the time to bring your Civil War related questions, whether it's about the war or the people at home, maybe an ancestor we might help you find...  bring it to us and allow us to help you.

May 13 & 14, 2004 - Our Special Songs, Letters, and Poems nights.  If you have something you would like to share, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne or HOST FMLY Bill.

May 20 & 21, 2004 - OPEN CHAT 

May 27 & 28 - to be announced

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night. 

Jayne & Bill  :)
Civil War Weekly Fireside Newsletter
http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/weekly_fireside_newsletter_archive.htm


Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 16 May 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line. 

NOTE from Jayne:  We're getting more subscribers all the time, and  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had recently.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter.

Please be assured your email addresses are not shared with, nor sold to, anyone else.

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NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
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We shared a few letters, read a poem and one of the "faithful" who is a reeanactor, told us of their perils with the weather, at Spotsylvania, the weekend of the 7th, 8th & 9th of this month.  Mercy, after hearing the story, I'm very thankful none of my friends were hurt.  While dishes were broken and tents torn, there were only a few bodily injuries and fortunately none that I heard of were serious. 

Join us this week for a Civil War Beginner's quiz.  :D   Come see how many question you can answer correctly.  And if there are some you don't know, then you'll also be learning something!! 

Join us some Thursday or Friday night and get in on the fun.  We have plenty of places to sit around the Fireside and warm cider for everyone. 

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
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OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well. 

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  Let us help you find your soldier.  Tell us their stories.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to. 

You can visit the other Genealogy chats (AOL only) by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

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"THE BOOK SHELF"
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If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.  

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Last week you read a posting by Mr. Edward Harding (http://eharding2btsancestors.homestead.com/Index.html) from the CIVIL-WAR-L@rootsweb.com mail list.  I asked Mr. Harding for permission to include it here in our newsletter and he very graciously gave it.  This week, I received the following from Mr. Frank Crawford, a Civil War History buff/historian/my guru and an author. 

~~~~~~

Please inform Mr. Harding that I believe there is plenty to be proud about concerning the Confederate States of America so there really is no need to criticize those with a Northern bent with unfounded charges. According to statistics, there were far more books dealing with the Civil War era written from the southern prospective than from the "winners."  The popularity of a book, however, does not always reflect on the number of books available. Citizens of the northern states wanted to read about their heroes.  Citizens of the southern states wanted to read about theirs.  There were more citizens in the northern states so there were more books purchased in that local.  There is and never was any great conspiracy to any such end as the victor writes the history.

Also, the last books I have read concerning the Civil War indicate North Carolina as being one of the most active of the southern states during the civil war.  Thus his statement concerning his gr gr grandfather settling in North Carolina although he was a Confederate soldier makes no sense to me.
I do wholeheartedly agree with his overall premise that one should read many books concerning the subject.  I would have to add that one should read many books with different slants on the same subject.  Reading the same opinions constantly serves only to further support that same opinion, even if it is possibly wrong.

Check this web site as simply one of many which refute his claim.  Ulysses S. Grant and Slavery

If you have read MY DEAR WIFE you are well aware of the hardships suffered at home by families of absent husbands and sons and you also know that sectionalism had no monopoly as to where those hardships were felt. 

Note from Jayne: 

Frank, I did indeed read MY DEAR WIFE. You know how much I enjoy reading those letters written home.

For you readers... It is a collection letters from an Illinois soldier written home to his wife from Sept 6th 1862 thru Aug 13th 1865.  There are many references by Private Pepper to his wife re the hardships at home, about which, she had written to him. 


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--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs,
and Poems evenings)
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The following poem was written by a special friend of the Civil War History Chats.  Frank, passed away 3 years ago last month. I guess I was feeling a little nostalgic today so I chose one of Frank's poems to share with you

Cannon Roars

By Frank Benway

The sun rose bright in Charlestown
But Secession was in the air
The calm was shattered by the roar
As the harbor cannons opened fire
Three short days sumter fell

The South fell into Celebration
The North stood in open Shock
The growing cry was War
For four long years
Those cannons roared
Belching out their Wall of Death

From Manasses to Petersburg
Gettysburg to Texas and beyond
They Killed and maimed with their roar
Those Blood torn bodies laid

Round shot was bad enough
But canister was the Bane
It cut through men like a  Scythe 
Still men did charge into that Fire
Some laid Bleeding on a Field
For Honor and for Country
On April ninth of sixty five
The quiet did return
In the Peace a Nation Bleeding
Bound its wounds, to Unite a Nation
Once torn  apart by War
To quell the cries of revenge
To make us one, ONCE MORE

Ben 

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THE HELP DESK
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Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom?? 
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

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DID YOU KNOW?
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Major Thomas Chamberlin, 150th Penna. Volunteers "Bucktails"

8 March 1916
Death Claims Another Officer of the Bucktails
Death having claimed Major Thomas Chamberlin last week, there now remains
but one surviving line officer of the famous 150th Pennsylvania Volunteers,
one of the Pennsylvania Bucktails commands, two companies of which were
recruited in Germantown. The remaining  officer is General Henry S.
Huidekoper, who was lieutenant colonel of the regiment.
Until recently Major Chamberlin lived at 429 West Stafford street,
Germantown. But lately he made his home in a Philadelphia apartment house,
where his death occurred.
The story of the dreadful slaughter to which the 150th was subjected at
Gettysburg has often been told: In that battle Colonel Langhorne Wister,
Lieutenant Colonel Huidekoper, Adjutant Ashhurst and Major Chamberlin were
all severely wounded in the first day's fight, and it devolved upon the
late
Captain George W. Jones, of Germantown to command what was left of the
regiment. Of the 700 men in the ranks of the regiment when it entered the
battle, only ninety-six reported fit for duty at night, all the others
having been killed, wounded or captured.
An interesting fact connected with Major Chamberlin's service at Gettysburg
is that when John Burns, the Gettysburg cobbler and constable, appeared on
the field for the purpose of joining in the fighting, the first officer
whom he approached was Major Chamberlin. Burns asked for permission to join
the 150th during the battle. Major Chamberlin referred him to Colonel
Wister who sent Burns into the nearby woods, so that he might be better
protected than if he remained with the regiment. In the woods Burns
attached himself to a Wisconsin command firing his musket until he was
wounded in the leg.
Major Chamberlin was 78 years old, and for the past five years had been
clerk of records of the Gettysburg Battlefield Memorial Commission. He was
a member of Meade Post #1, Grand Army of the Republic and a companion of
the Loyal Legion. He entered the military service June 21, 1861, as Captain
of Company D, Fifth Reserves, was severely wounded in battle a year later
and in September, 1862, was commissioned as major in the One Hundred and
Fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteers. He participated in the battles of
Antietam, Port Conway, Pollak's Mill, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg.
After serving on the Rappahannock during the winter of 1863-4 his health
became impaired and he resigned March 15, 1864, with the rank of lieutenant
colonel.
Major Chamberlin delivered the address at the dedication of the monument of
the 150th Regiment on the 3 Gettysburg field.
His death occurred six days. after that of his wife. In both instances
pneumonia was the fatal ailment. Burial took place in Lewisburg, Pa.
He was from Columbia County. Chamberlain wrote the excellent regimental
history of the 150th Volunteers.

.......... and there you have it.

The above was sent to me by An Madra Rua.  She had seen it in the CIVILWARPHILA elist she belongs to.  Should you like to subscribe, you may do so at  http://listserv.temple.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=civilwarphila&A=1

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Weekly Web Sites we've received
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If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

From:  Cyndis list of new sites

URL:     http://www.authorlisasaunders.com/mycustompage0013.htm
TITLE:     New York 9th Heavy Artillery
DESCRIPTION:     New York 9th Heavy Artillery of Wayne and Cayuga Counties
during the American Civil War. Timeline,Excerpts of Letters, Obituaries,
List of soldiers such as SEWARD, MCDOWELL, WAGER, MURPHY, AND GARRITY.


From:   Maryd0318

http://www.charmingtowns.com/dir/society/historic_sites/sheldon_church.html
Old Sheldon Church Remains this includes some letters written during the Civil War...and further down the page info on some books available from Amazon, including Civil War Flags of South Carolina

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FROM OUR READERS
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If your ancestor has or you have a story to tell, please send it to us. 
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill  
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com  

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From:  DaePowell

Military Burials


The Tuesday, April 13, issue of the St Petersburg Times tells of a new government website.  Information is as follows: VA has made it easier and faster for the public to get answers about family history, old war buddies, or famous war heroes.  The agency has put 3.2 million records for veterans cemeteries and burials in Arlington National Cemetery on the Web since 1999.  Joe Nosari, VA's deputy chief information officer for Memorial Affairs, said the records used to be on paper and microfilm.  Private companies have put some of the information on line an charged for it, but the VA information is free.  The VA's grave site navigater includes names, dates of birth and death, military service dates, service  branch and rank if known, cemetery information and grave location in the cemetery.    The VA will withold some information, such as next of kin for privacy purposes. The site is updated daily.  Annually, about 80,000 veterans are buried at national cemeteries. 

The address for the Veterans Affairs Narional Cemetery Administration Web Site is: 
www.cem.va.gov

Click on nationwide gravesite locator.  A search form allows you to enter a first and last name to find a record of a veteran buried in a Veterans Afairs National Cemetery.
If more information is needed click on Advanced Search Options.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From:  An Madra Rua

This is my source:  http://dcwl.com/~dave/underwood.html

PART 5....... March 1865

Albert Underwood Civil War Diary

Fri. Apr. 8: Rained considerable last night. Left camp at 4 1/2 oclock. We march in the rear today. Had considerable trouble and bad luck getting along today till toward evening we had tolerable good roads. Pine woods all the way and but few houses on this road. Went into camp about 9 oclock in 1/2 mile of Pleasant Hill. Heard cannonading this evening. Traveled 17 miles today, no streams or water near by.

Sat. Apr. 9: Reveille sounded at 2 oclock and we were ready to move by 5 oclock. Fighting a few miles ahead. We were ordered forward about 10 and stood in position near Pleasant Hill till 2 oclock when we were ordered forward again, and formed in line of battle just in the edge of Pleasant Hill. About 5 oclock the firing grew fearful and our force fell back to where our Battery stood. Then our men drove them back and the fighting ceased about 8 oclock.

Sun. Apr. 10: Harnessed at midnight and left camp at 3 oclock. We brought off 2 pieces with us. Our force is marching toward the river today. The Rebs are said to be retreating this morning. Had pretty good roads and got along well today, marched miles and went into camp on the Rio Honde. We took our horses and went about 2 miles after corn, found but little. Quite tired and sleepy, having slept but little for 2 nights.

Mon. Apr. 11: Left camp at 6 1/2 oclock, marched pretty fast. Roads tolerable good but very dusty in places. Nice weather. Made a long halt in 3 miles of the river and reached the river about 5 oclock but not get into camp until 8 oclock with our horses very much worsted. We could not get forage and but little water for our horses. The boats are not here except a few gunboats. River falling.

Tues. Apr. 12: Beautiful morning. We are camped at the edge of a woods about a quarter of a mile from river. I went down to the river this morning and took a good wash. Daniel came up this evening. They are camped just below Grandcore. Cannonading heard all day up the river. Our gunboats and transports are up the river and the Rebs have probably got in their rear. A gunboat arrived from Nashville this evening received a mail.

Wed. Apr. 13: Quite warm today. Received marching orders about noon and to harness and be in readiness at once to move out. Our transports were to be down at noon. We stood in readiness until about 8 oclock and unhitched and tied our horses to the picket rope with the harness on till morning. No boats came down yet. The cannonading has not been heard since noon. Some of the troops have crossed the river.

Thurs. Apr. 14: The SHREVEPORT came down this morning, also the ROB ROY and other boats. Goldsmith and I went down to Grandore (?) today. Saw the 21st boys, went into the hospital and saw Zena. He was wounded above here on the ROB ROY. They were engaged 2 days in the fight. Several boats riddled considerable by musketry, none seriously damaged. Nearly all the boats have now returned, also the infantry force that went up.

Continued next week.................

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
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If you have a resource from which you would be willing to do look-ups for folks, please let us know and we'll add it here

NEW!!!!!  UBucket@aol.com has offered to do free Civil War research from veterans from Wisconsin.  He is the author of "Civil War Veterans of Winnebago County, Wisconsin"

eharding2@cox.net has offered to do lookups for folks with ancestors from the Confederacy, focusing mainly on North Carolina, but has other sources also.  

GoldHobo@aol.com has told us if anyone wants info the the 85th NY Inf. Regt. (Plymouth Pilgrims) you may email her.  She has a book about them.    Her one request is that you put 85th Regt. in the subject line so she doesn't delete it by mistake

JLawson656@aol.com has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email.

GandMS@aol.com  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you.

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin/frye@gnat.net  does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com  Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

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"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
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If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html


May 14-16, Virginia - Reenactment, 140th anniversary of the Battle of New Market on the historic battlefield. Information: www.vmi.edu/museum/nm or 540-740-3101. For schedule,  http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/news.html#newmkt2004 

May 22 - 23  Virginia -  Reenactment, living history and 140th anniversary commemoration of the Battle of Wilson's Wharf (Fort Pocahontas) at the James River near Sherwood Forest Plantation off Route 5 between Richmond and Williamsburg. Details: www.fortpocahontas.org


May 22 - 23 West Virginia - Living history and reenactment, "The Battle of Lewisburg" on the Greenbrier campus of the New River Community & Technical College in Lewisburg. Camps open 10 am-8 pm Saturday with speakers, exhibits, and battle reenactment. Dance (all welcome) 8 pm Saturday. Speakers, living history begin noon Sunday with a funeral cortege for an officer killed in battle beginning at 3 pm followed by a ceremony at the Confederate cemetery. All free. www.battleoflewisburg.org.

May 31, Gettysburg, PA  - Memorial Day Parade and Ceremonies at the Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg. 2 pm. 717-334-1124, extension 422 or 431 or www.nps.gov/gett .


JUNE is a very active month for Living Histories and Reenactments so be sure to check the Website 
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0604.html


June 3-6    Annual Blue and Gray Reunion, Civil War Weekend in Philippi, WV. Event includes much living history, medical scenarios, period music, encampments, demonstrations, parades, skirmishes and a reenactment at 2 pm Sunday. Saturday activities include artillery demonstration at 11 am; skirmish 1 pm at the bridge; Civil War Ball 8 pm. Most activities are free. 304-457-4265 or 304-457-5183.    

June 5-6    Blue and Gray Days at Point Lookout State Park, MD. Living history drills and programs and demonstrations and exhibits about life at the prisoner-of-war camp. 11 am-4 pm Saturday and 11 am-3 pm Sunday. Free with paid park fees. 301-872-5688.    

Sat. June 5 & Sun., June 6  Pennypacker Mills, Schwenksville, PA  Civil War Reunion Weekend  A must-see experience for the entire family as you emerge yourselves into the Civil War era to see an authentic military encampment, period music and fashion, guest speakers, living history demonstrations, sutlers, artillery, and battle scenes.  Ongoing activities both days.  On-site parking and refreshments available.  No pets, please.  Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  No charge.  

June 12-13    Reenactment and living history weekend commemorating the 140th anniversary of the Battle of Trevilian Station in Louisa County, VA (between Charlottesville and Richmond). Camps open 9 am-5 pm Saturday, 10 am-4 pm Sunday. Demonstrations, plantation house tours and other programs scheduled. Adult tickets: $10 daily, $15 two-day. Site is located on Route 15, three miles south of Boswell Tavern (Routes 15 and 22). 540-832-2708 or email edcrebbs@yahoo.com    

June  26-27    Living history encampment and demonstrations by the 20th Maine and the US Sharpshooters at the Pennsylvania Memorial, Maryland troops in Pitzer Woods and Virginia soldiers at Spangler Spring in the Gettysburg National Military Park, PA. www.nps.gov/gett or 717-334-1124 extension 422.    

   
JULY 17 & 18, Lancaster PA, Landis Valley: A Civil War Village
Take an unusual glimpse into history when you visit a Civil War-era Pennsylvania Dutch village that has been taken over by Union Troops. Hundreds of authentically dressed civilian and military re-enactors recreate a slice of 1860s life. Several informative seminars are offered both days. Books and other merchandise of special interest to Civil War buffs will be available at The Weathervane, Landis Valley Museum Store. Admission fee. Museum members admitted free.  Saturday & Sunday  10:00AM - 5:00PM

September 3 - 5, 2004 New Jersey.....  Battle of Cedar Bridge, Lake Manahawkin, NJ     Last Battle of the American War of Independence
http://www.telecottage.com/staffordhist/cedarbridge.html

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Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
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Time:  
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

May 20 & 21, 2004 - OPEN CHAT 

May 27 & 28 - Civil War Beginners Quiz - Join us, see how much you already know and if you don't know, you can learn. ;D

June 1 & 2 - OPEN CHAT 

June 8 & 9 -  Our Special Songs, Letters, and Poems nights.  If you have something you would like to share, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne or HOST FMLY Bill.

June 15 & 16 - OPEN CHAT

June 22 & 23 - To be announced

June 29 & 30 - To be announced

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night. 

Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 23 May 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line.  

NOTE from Jayne:  We're getting more subscribers all the time, and  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had recently.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter. 

Please be assured your email addresses are not shared with, nor sold to, anyone else.

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NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
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Before I go any further, I want to wish my former partner Jim a VERY, VERY HAPPY BIRTHDAY this week.   (((((((()))))))))   Jimmy I miss you, partner!!!

Join us this week for a Civil War Beginner's quiz.  :D   Come see how many question you can answer correctly.  And if there are some you don't know, then you'll also be learning something!!  

Join us some Thursday or Friday night and get in on the fun.  We have plenty of places to sit around the Fireside and warm cider for everyone.  

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
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OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.  

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  Let us help you find your soldier.  Tell us their stories.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to.  

You can visit the other Genealogy chats (AOL only) by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

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"THE BOOK SHELF"
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If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.  

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--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs, 
and Poems evenings)
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FRom   eharding2@cox.net 

Camp 3rd N.C. Cavalry
Near Petersburg Va  
13th Aug 64 
My own dear Sue: 
(Illegible……….the first part of the letter appears Henry Machen Patrick is telling his wife Sue that he is taking the time to write to her amid all of his duties and thanks her for previous letters.)  ……if not for your precious letters to cheer me camp life would be almost unbearable.  While on duty particularly when exposed to danger, my mind is sufficiently engaged, but when in camp its duties are so monotonous (illegible words) very badly. It is at those times my darlings letters are most appreciated.  We are having a very easy time now, being on picket only about two days out of eight.  While in camp though, we drill one hour in the forenoon of every day & graze our horses in the afternoon.  While on picket we stand so near the Yankee pickets that we can converse with each other.  Some places, the pickets are not more than fifty yards apart.  They are very friendly, often offering to exchange papers, swap Sugar & coffee for tobacco.  We have very positive orders though, to have no communication with them, except by orders of our Brigade commander.  On our portion of the line the pickets do not fire on each other except when there is a general advance.  It is thought by some that Grant is gradually withdrawing from the front of Petersburg, and transporting his troops up the Potomac.  There is a rumor in Camp to-day, that Gens Lee & Grant have both left P. & that Beauregard & Butler were in command of the respective armies at this place.  If that is so, we may soon expect to hear of a heavy battle somewhere near the Potomac.  I should not be surprised that our Brigade moves in that direction, if the rumor mentioned is correct.  Speaking of my coming home, I see no prospect, except I get a furlough.  That I cannot expect before the latter part of the fall or winter.  I hardly think that we will be sent to No Car to recruit next winter as the first & second Regts have neither been, they will probably go if any does.  Upon the whole do you not think that it would be better for me not to go home again while the war lasts, since my visit last summer caused you to loose so much & six hundred dollars is paying too dear for the whistle is it not?  I should have been a better boy.  Don’t you think so?  Sunday morning : 14th.  Yesterday evening I was interupted to go on dress parade, therefore could not finish my letter.  I now will commence again but will be disturbed again before I can complete this, to go on “inspection”.  I do not think you should be as indifferent as you estimated in one of your letters, should I not be spared too return to my loved ones.  Had it been the present generation alone that we would benefit it would have been better to have submitted to the incroachments of that blind fanaticism of the north that has drafted our sunny south with mourning & caused thousands of hearthstones to be desolate.  We should remember it is not for ourselves alone we labor.  Our revolutionary fathers planted the seed of liberty - nurtured the tender plants & watered it with their blood, & for what?  That we, their offspring might eat of the fruits thereof.  Are we less patriotic than they?  Should it be said, that the sons of such sires have become so selfish that they look only to the present enforcement of themselves & sit comfy and witness the manufacture of the chains that are being prepared for their children?  I know you will say no.  I am aware that there are those who pretend to believe that this war might have been averted - that it was in the power of certain southern men to have prevented hostilities between the two sections & that those men are responsible for the evils we are now experiencing.  I am one of those who do not think it could have been consistant with Southern honor.  And now my darling, should you be so unfortunate as to have to make that sacrifice you so much fear, do it with that Christian & patriotic resignation that so characterized the Spartan women.  But my dear Sue I do feel that with the prayers of my dear wife & those of my little ones living constantly presented for my safety and for my return, I shall be spared to be happy again with you and them as in days past.  Our prospects are brightening.  It is thought the summer campaign is nearly ended in Va, & what has “the greatest army on the planet” accomplished?  Nothing but defeat in which not less than 100,000 of their best troops have been lost.  Holdon stock has gone so far below par that it is impossible to express its present status in figures.  I feel really proud of the “Old North State” & rejoice to know that, that portion of her degenerated sons who have been blinded by party fanaticism & those whose political ambition has led them astray is so small.  I know that there are those who would like to have the pleasure (to them) to say that the Holdon men in the army did not have the privileg of voting as they wished.  From personal observation I can speak only respecting my own Company.  In that I do know there never was a fairer election held that I ever witnessed.  There were twenty-eight votes polled.  Vance rced 27 & Holdon rced one.  No man objected to the Holdonite voting – not even a word was said to him.  His name is Patterson & though a citizen of No. Ca. by birth, has lived in Boston 8 or 10 years of his life.  Holdon rced only four votes in the 3rd.  I have not heard of any Regt in which any man who wished to vote for H was debarred from so doing.  Vance may be 2nd choice of some, but he is my 1st choice, & could his virtues be known at home, which would be the case, were it not for the disaffected constantly preaching peace convention & instead of taking their muskets & sending leaden commissioners & death dealing delegates to the enemy’s ranks, the much desired boon would not be far distant.  Among many other good thing our excellent Governer has done he has run through the blockade and sold to destitute families of soldiers 40,000 pair of cards at $5 pr pair when they could not have procured them in any other way for less than from $40 to $100 pr pair.  But enough of this one sided question.  You spoke my darling about sending me some money.  I do not need any now.  I am oblige to you for the kind offer.  I do not use much as we get plenty to eat.  I sometimes wish for fruit melons etc but they are selling so extravagantly that I am striving to practice selforenial.  Water-melens are selling for from $5 to $20 each, apples $2 two dollars per quart.  We have to pay a dollar a garment for washing and profiting by past experience I now wash my own clothes.  We are not allowed to carry but one jacket, 1 pr pants, which we wear, and a change only of under garments.  The latter are frequently reduced to only on suit.  We are camped near a creek and at no hour of the day is this stream clear of soldiers washing.  There is a great many socks in the creek and we take our clothes on a large rock and with a stick give them what Paddy gave the drum – “h__ l of a bating.”  I must now close without finishing this sheet.  I have fraped (sp) every pleasant morning writing to my darling.  As I concluded the above paragraph the bugle sounded for us to “saddle up.”  We are now ready to march and in the interim I will conclude.  I do not know where we are going.  Rumor says to the North side of the James.  I will write you when we stop.  I do not think it safe to transmit money per mail – will try and send you the Examiner.  I will send this by Capt Buck, who leaves this afternoon on furlough.  My love to all.  Keep my little ones for me.  T.R.C. is well.                                                       Yours..Henry 

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THE HELP DESK
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Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom??  
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if 
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

This week I had an email from a lady who would like to know about the Navy on the Great Lakes during the Civil War.   She is researching her ancestor, William "Windy Bill" Gebhart/Gabheart/Gebbart/Gebheart who was allegedy a sailor in the Civil War on the Great Lakes.  

He was born in 1834 in Kentucky.  He married Nancy Caroline Estes in Dec 1867 (she thinks in Newton Co., MO)  In the 1880 census he was listed  in Johnson, Co., Nebraska with the Gabheart spelling. Then in 1910 with son Robert Gebhart in Peoria IL   A son William Thomas Gebhart was reportedly also with the Navy on the Great Lakes in 1889-1890.

Can anyone help here?  You may send your answers to me here at CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com or to  longrider9@earthlink.net   If you send it directly, please copy me on it so I can share the answer with the readers.  

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DID YOU KNOW?
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...................and there you have it.  

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Weekly Web Sites we've received 
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If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com 

From:  Cyndis list of new sites

URL:     http://www.archivecdbooks.us/store/usa/CW.html 
TITLE:     Civil War
DESCRIPTION:     Reproductions of old and rare books relating to the Civil 
War available on CD.

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From:  Tess Toobe

DAR Library Catalog
http://dar.library.net/   

Library of Congress Catalog
http://catalog.loc.gov/ 

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From:   Maryd0318

Two Diaries
http://www.rootsweb.com/~scbkhs/jervey.html
additional letters, etc are also included.------describing the terror, destruction of the Plantations, movement of troops, news from Altanta, news of Lincoln's assassination, etc. 

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From:   bitsobluengray
these are from a maillist I belong to:

Black soldiers honored with Civil War Trails marker, By JOHN HOPKINS,
The Virginian-Pilot
http://home.hamptonroads.com/stories/story.cfm?story=70667&ran=32479

Marker honors Confederate general, By PHYLLIS SPEIDELL, 
The Virginian-Pilot
http://home.hamptonroads.com/stories/story.cfm?story=70609&ran=25083 

Should Memorial Day and America's War Dead be commercialized?
http://home.pacbell.net/veterans/xmemday.htm 

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FROM OUR READERS
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If your ancestor has or you have a story to tell, please send it to us.  
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill   
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com   

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From:  MM3C11259    
   
The following was written by Capt Pettit who when captured was in the 120th NY infantry, Co F commander. Pettit was captured in the Wilderness in June, 1864. He was 39 when he enlisted.

DESCRIPTION OF ENVELOPE
Addressed to: James B. Smillie
                     No. 20, West 41st Street
                     New York
From: Capt Gilbert Pettit
         Prisoner of War
         near Columbia, S.C.
Across top center of envelope: By Flag of Truce
Postage stamps- left to right, top right
1. .03 U.S. Stamp
2. .10 Confederate Stamp
Note: Confederate stamps were not valid for delivery of mail in the U.S. A U.S. 
          stamp had to be affixed to this letter once it passed the lines for it to be
          delivered to the NY addressee
Postmarks (3)
1. Target style- no lettering cancelling U.S. stamp
2. Partially illegible postmark cancelling both the U.S. and Confederate stamps 
     specifying CHARL( rest illegible)- Charleston?
Note: the above postmarks had to be applied after the letter was delivered to Union
          hands.
3. Clear postmark to the left of stamps- PORT ROYAL S.C. Nov 21 ' 64
Notation at the bottom of the envelope- Rec'd New York Nov 26th 1864

LETTER
Written on 4x8" lined paper similar to that used by children
                                                                      Camp Military Prison near
Dear Cousin,                                                    Columbia, S.C. Oct 27, 1864

I wrote you on the 12th inst to send me a box of provision. For fear you did not get my letter I write again. If you have not sent it you will confer a great favor if you will do so.
I would like a blanker or two of some kind, some socks, a pair of shoes ------- 8 and a little underclothing and a cheap overcoat. As for the provision, send such as you think best. A ham, sugar and coffee would go good. Perhaps you could send me some can fruit and meat but use your own judgement. I would also like a cheap carpet bag to carry things we have. If we are exchanged soon, I will not need these things. Perhaps (name illegible) and some of the rest will help you get it up. Frank is still in the hospital at Charleston. The last I heard from him (10 days ago) he was improving. My health is very good. We are prisoners at a camp near --------?-----------
Prison, near Columbia, S.C. address per Flag of Truce----------?-------- Hilton Head, care of Gen'l Shafter. Send paper and envelopes.
Give my love to all. Hoping Imay have the pleasure of meeting you soon, I remain affectionately                                                     
                                                                               Gilbert

NOTE from MM3C   
  Jayne- did some research to find out Pettit's Regiment, Co and when he was captured. Perhaps you can add a postscript to this letter regarding the camp name which was unreadable, possibly the General referred to ( Was fairly unreadable- my best attempt of Shauter, or Thauter was Shafter. Also whether he survived the war. Wonder who the Frank was he mentioned?
Regards Ted

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From:  An Madra Rua

This is my source:  http://dcwl.com/~dave/underwood.html 

PART 5....... March 1865

Albert Underwood Civil War Diary

Fri. Apr. 15: Rained a little last night. Cleaned up our camp and put it in better order. Boats are still coming down yet but not much prospect of moving soon. The river is getting quite low now. Everything has been quiet today, no cannonading has been heard since last evening. Beautiful weather. Banks' has gone to New Orleans after reinforcements. Some of the 3rd Battery boys were captured across the river today. 

Sat. Apr. 16: Beautiful morning. Received orders to load all camp and garrison equipment on the boats and in a few minutes we received orders to hold on till further orders. Daniel came up today again. Some talk this evening of our going through by land to Alexandria and then down the river. There is some talk that Gen. Bank's will go up to Shreveport, yet the river is still falling slowly. 

Sun. Apr. 17: Everything is quiet this morning, more so than usual. I went out and heard the old priest of the 58th Illinois infantry Regt. officiate in the capacity of chaplain. We are expecting orders to march pretty soon but we do not know whether we will go up the river to Shreveport or down the river, or even whether the river is still falling yet. Quite warm today. 

Mon. Apr. 18: Beautiful morning. Another quiet lonesome day. I worked all the forenoon putting in a new pole in the caisson and fixed up other things. We turned over the two captured guns this morning. The report is today that some of Gen. Steele's Cavalry have come in and it is also reported that the Rebs are coming to whip Banks again before he gets reinforcements or moves again. 

Thurs. Apr. 19: We were awakened this morning at 4 oclock with orders to harness and hitch up immediately. Remained in readiness till about 10 oclock and got orders to unharness. I feel quite unwell today, a warm lonesome day. Received orders about 3 oclock to pack up and be ready to move at once. As soon as we get ready, orders came to unharness again. Louder caught some very nice fish in Red River today. 

Wed. Apr. 20: Everything is quiet this morning. Received orders to get ready to move at once. Left in half an hour at 1 oclock. Made a long halt at Grand Ecore landing. Tolerable good roads, very dusty. Reached Natchitoches about sundown. Our pickets were skirmishing this evening. Formed a line of battle and had gone to bed when we were ordered to hitch up and we moved up in a new position and formed another line of battle for the night. 

Thurs. Apr. 21: Harnessed this morning about 4 1/2 oclock. We remained in position until 10 oclock, then we moved about 200 yards further to the left and formed again and remained in line till about 10 oclock in the night when we started out east across Cain River. Marched about 1 mile and made a long halt and remained till 3 oclock and marched till about daylight and halted again. Heard skirmishing all day 3 miles out. 

Fri. Apr. 22: Started forward again about sunrise after the 13th and 19th Corps passed from the Grand Ecore road. Marched till about noon and then halted till about 5 oclock while some skirmishing was going on in the rear. Then we marched till about midnight and then halted till about 1 1/2 oclock and then moved up to Cloterville. Camped about 2 hours. It was 4 oclock before we laid down to sleep having marched two nights and one day right along without resting only by halts. 

Sat. Apr. 23: Left Cloterville 6 oclock and went out about 2 miles and formed a line of battle. Cannonading being heard a few miles further on and finally in our rear. Two of our Brigades were sent back and the 3rd Battery and drove them back again. Two oclock and the train started forward and as soon as past we moved forward again. Rained a little early this morning. Went into camp about 7 oclock. Beautiful weather. Unharnessed tonight, were harness 60 hours. 

Continued next week.................

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
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If you have a resource from which you would be willing to do look-ups for folks, please let us know and we'll add it here

NEW!!!!!  UBucket@aol.com has offered to do free Civil War research from veterans from Wisconsin.  He is the author of "Civil War Veterans of Winnebago County, Wisconsin"

eharding2@cox.net has offered to do lookups for folks with ancestors from the Confederacy, focusing mainly on North Carolina, but has other sources also.   

GoldHobo@aol.com has told us if anyone wants info the the 85th NY Inf. Regt. (Plymouth Pilgrims) you may email her.  She has a book about them.    Her one request is that you put 85th Regt. in the subject line so she doesn't delete it by mistake

JLawson656@aol.com has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email. 

GandMS@aol.com  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you. 

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin/frye@gnat.net  does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html 

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com  Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

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"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
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If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html


May 31, Gettysburg, PA  - Memorial Day Parade and Ceremonies at the Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg. 2 pm. 717-334-1124, extension 422 or 431 or www.nps.gov/gett . 

JUNE is a very active month for Living Histories and Reenactments so be sure to check the Website  
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0604.html

June 3-6 Annual Blue and Gray Reunion, Civil War Weekend in Philippi, WV. Event includes much living history, medical scenarios, period music, encampments, demonstrations, parades, skirmishes and a reenactment at 2 pm Sunday. Saturday activities include artillery demonstration at 11 am; skirmish 1 pm at the bridge; Civil War Ball 8 pm. Most activities are free. 304-457-4265 or 304-457-5183. 

June 5-6 Blue and Gray Days at Point Lookout State Park, MD. Living history drills and programs and demonstrations and exhibits about life at the prisoner-of-war camp. 11 am-4 pm Saturday and 11 am-3 pm Sunday. Free with paid park fees. 301-872-5688. 

Sat. June 5 & Sun., June 6  Pennypacker Mills, Schwenksville, PA  Civil War Reunion Weekend  A must-see experience for the entire family as you emerge yourselves into the Civil War era to see an authentic military encampment, period music and fashion, guest speakers, living history demonstrations, sutlers, artillery, and battle scenes.  Ongoing activities both days.  On-site parking and refreshments available.  No pets, please.  Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  No charge.   

June 12-13 Reenactment and living history weekend commemorating the 140th anniversary of the Battle of Trevilian Station in Louisa County, VA (between Charlottesville and Richmond). Camps open 9 am-5 pm Saturday, 10 am-4 pm Sunday. Demonstrations, plantation house tours and other programs scheduled. Adult tickets: $10 daily, $15 two-day. Site is located on Route 15, three miles south of Boswell Tavern (Routes 15 and 22). 540-832-2708 or email edcrebbs@yahoo.com 

June  26-27 Living history encampment and demonstrations by the 20th Maine and the US Sharpshooters at the Pennsylvania Memorial, Maryland troops in Pitzer Woods and Virginia soldiers at Spangler Spring in the Gettysburg National Military Park, PA. www.nps.gov/gett or 717-334-1124 extension 422. 

JULY 17 & 18, Lancaster PA, Landis Valley: A Civil War Village
Take an unusual glimpse into history when you visit a Civil War-era Pennsylvania Dutch village that has been taken over by Union Troops. Hundreds of authentically dressed civilian and military re-enactors recreate a slice of 1860s life. Several informative seminars are offered both days. Books and other merchandise of special interest to Civil War buffs will be available at The Weathervane, Landis Valley Museum Store. Admission fee. Museum members admitted free.  Saturday & Sunday  10:00AM - 5:00PM 

September 3 - 5, 2004 New Jersey.....  Battle of Cedar Bridge, Lake Manahawkin, NJ     Last Battle of the American War of Independence
http://www.telecottage.com/staffordhist/cedarbridge.html 

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Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
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Time:   
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

May 27 & 28 - Civil War Beginners Quiz - Join us, see how much you already know and if you don't know, you can learn. ;D

June 1 & 2 - OPEN CHAT 

June 8 & 9 -  Our Special Songs, Letters, and Poems nights.  If you have something you would like to share, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne or HOST FMLY Bill.

June 15 & 16 - OPEN CHAT

June 22 & 23 - To be announced

June 29 & 30 - To be announced

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night.  

Jayne & Bill
Civil War Weekly Fireside Newsletter
http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/weekly_fireside_newsletter_archive.htm 

Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 31 May 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line.  

NOTE from Jayne:  We're getting more subscribers all the time, and  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had recently.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter. 

Please be assured your email addresses are not shared with, nor sold to, anyone else.

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NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
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I'm sitting here assembling the newsletter on Memorial Day.  While the following isn't related directly to the Civil War, I'm going to post this anyway.  I had an experience on Saturday, May 29 that I will never forget.

What a day!!!    It was WONDERFUL, it was emotional, it was exhausting, the weather couldn't have been any better and it was also disappointing.  Disappointing in that we did not get to see the memorial up close and personal.  It was closed to the public until 7 PM.  To see all those WWII Vets was really something else.  Many of them, both men and women, were in their uniforms. I got the greatest picture.....   There was a WWII Navy veteran dressed in his blues, you know, the ones with all the buttons  :)  and a young career navy man dress in the modern day dress whites.   That was a sight to see.  

The day started for us about 3:15 AM (needless to say we didnt get much sleep)  We boarded the train at 5:15 in Wilmington DE and headed for Washington DC, where we arrived about 7 AM.  Then we had to get on the metro (another train) and get to one of their stations where there would be shuttle buses to the different seating sections.   HA!!!!!   what a laugh!!  Once we were dropped off the bus we had a VERY long way to walk.  I don't think I've every seen so many folding chairs in all my life!!!!!!    They had a special area for wheel chairs (there was a white fibre matting covering the grass which made it easier for the wheel chairs to roll.)  We arrived soon enough to be able to get a place to sit right in front of one of the HUGE screens they had for viewing the ceremony and activities leading up to it.  At 10 AM there was a service from the National Cathedral which was quite moving.  At noon they had a Tribute to the Veterans.  Music, dancing and clothing all from the 30's and 40's.  What fun!!!!  We took the opportunity, during the tribute to walk along the pools between the Wash. Monument and the Lincoln Memorial. Ben stayed put.  We could only get "so far" toward the Wash. Monument cause, as I said, the WWII Memorial was closed to the public all day, so we did get to see it from a distance.  

They gave us a nice packet as we went in with a program. a beautiful commemorative pin, a flag, a picture of the monument and a magazine I haven't looked at yet.  They also gave everyone a bottle of water and a "lanyard" which you could put you "ticket" on and hang around your neck. At  the ceremony, Bob Dole, former President George H. W. Bush, Tom Hanks and current President Bush, as well as others. spoke.  I had thought I was going to get thru the day without shedding too many tears.  Well....  after all the speeches were over, 4 military jets flew, in formation, straight over the length of the mail...  So much for a few tears.  I totally lost it!!!   

The worst part of the day was trying to get away from the mall and back to the Metro station.  We waited well over an hour and a half in line waiting to get on a bus.....   and we weren't all that far from the beginning of the line.  It just seems like all the buses were going somewhere besides the Metro center.  Finally one of the volunteers convinced one of the drivers to call in and get persmission to take a load to the metro center...  FINALLY!!!!   We got back to Union Station with a little over an hour before our train was to leave, so we got something to eat, besides the crackers, fig newtons and granola bars we had been munching on all day.  We arrived back in Wilmington about 9 PM.  By the time we got home it was about 10 and we were exhausted!!!!   

I guess next trip down, we'll actually get to see the Memorial.  :::::sigh::::::

Join us some Thursday or Friday night and get in on the fun.  We have plenty of places to sit around the Fireside and warm cider for everyone.  

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
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OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.  

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  Let us help you find your soldier.  Tell us their stories.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to.  

JOIN HOST FMLY Rose....  Saturday Midnight ET  for help tracing your heritige to the American Civil time period.

You can visit the other Genealogy chats (AOL only) by going to KEYWORD:  Genealogy Forum > then up in the top right corner pick "hosted chats".   The link to message boards is also located at the same place.

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"THE BOOK SHELF"
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If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.   

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--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs, 
and Poems evenings)
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This letter was written by my husband's ggrandfather Levi McCormick to his wife Tamar

Sept 5th 1863 Fairfax Station  Virginia Dear wife  this is Saturday eve I recieved a letter from you this eve and find you all wel and it finds us the same but some of our men is sick  Mitchener is not wel and looks bad but he is stil on duty yet  William Mackeneel was buried to day  he was buried at Alexandria  he once lived with Jos Eastburn  he leaves a wife & family  he looked as stout an eney man in the Reg but he died verry sudent  some of our boys has got furlows to go home  Lee Pusey got one last munday & Charles Yong got one yesterday  Yong has bin sick in the Hospitel for some time and I will try my  luck prety soon  if nothing hapens we will be paid this nex weak and then I will be ready to come as soon as I get my pepers for when I come I want to travel whear I please  I hav heard that we are not to get eney substutes for our Regmt and I will be glad if we get none of them for they are bad felows Samuel got a letter from Westley today and they are all well but Joseph Pogue has got in a scrape  it may take some of his change and I dont caire if it does when he finds how they are treated he will more uneasy  I would not be a substitute for a thousand dollars of eney mans money but the rich thinks they can get a poar man to doe eney thing for their money but it aint me  I have sean men down hear that was verry rich that cant hardley live now and som of our Delawarians may see that time yet when their money may not be so plenty with them but let it be so  this war will be setled some of thes daysand then we will tend to them  they cant blaggord us then or down goes their meet house  the coperheads has put out a book about our last election but if they cut a shine a gain we will come and see them again and they will have to sing dum and dig out  they are traitors and they are nothing else   I dont want to write about this for I have travled in the dark and in mud to my knees when they hav bin laing in their beds and enjoying the conferts of home and then they will curs us for what we are doeing but their dog is dead and they leaders know it if we live to get back they will find a change for we will never patronize a reb  they will never get a dollar of my money if I know it  if I cant get things from our one mem I will doe with out it  we hav nothing new hear but they brought six hundred rebels past hear that come in to our lines frome Lees armey and they say that their is plenty more will come   the first chance for they say they wont fight eney more but they are going home to their family and this is the way it is going on  Some of the big bugs comes in to our camps and gets what ever they can get to live on  boys come in and asks us for bread  well the hour is growing late and my letter may not interest you as mutch as it might but this is what is going on hear   we hav got our camp laid out and we ar going to put up our tents this nex weak  J Chambers got a box to day and got some knew shirts and he is a pleased boy  wel you need not look for me until you see me but if I dont come you can come and see me and I keep my money to see if I get home if not I will send for you but I hav found that I can come home cheaper than you can come hear  it will cost you about 12 or fifteen dollors to come to Alexander  your boarding and all and  it will cost me about 5 Dollors to go and come back but you must not think that I dont want to see you for that is all that I have in this world that is worth living  for my family and my country  I stop by sending my love to you all from afectinate and true Husband  Serg Levi McCormick  I dont need eney more shirts  give my love to the children           good by 

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THE HELP DESK
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Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom??  
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if 
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

NOTE from Jayne  I'm going to leave this in another week...  

This week I had an email from a lady who would like to know about the Navy on the Great Lakes during the Civil War.   She is researching her ancestor, William "Windy Bill" Gebhart/Gabheart/Gebbart/Gebheart who was allegedy a sailor in the Civil War on the Great Lakes.  

He was born in 1834 in Kentucky.  He married Nancy Caroline Estes in Dec 1867 (she thinks in Newton Co., MO)  In the 1880 census he was listed  in Johnson, Co., Nebraska with the Gabheart spelling. Then in 1910 with son Robert Gebhart in Peoria IL   A son William Thomas Gebhart was reportedly also with the Navy on the Great Lakes in 1889-1890.

Can anyone help here?  You may send your answers to me here at CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com or to  longrider9@earthlink.net   If you send it directly, please copy me on it so I can share the answer with the readers. 

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DID YOU KNOW?
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Memorial Day History
http://www.usmemorialday.org/backgrnd.html 

Memorial Day
http://www.historychannel.com/exhibits/memorial/memorial.html 

History of Memorial Day
http://www.twilightbridge.com/hobbies/festivals/memorial/history.htm 


...................and there you have it.  

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Weekly Web Sites we've received 
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If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com 

From:  Cyndis list of new sites

URL:     http://www.geocities.com/seventeenthkyinf/ 
TITLE:     17th Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, US
DESCRIPTION:     Rosters, burial info, and history of the 17th Ky Vol Inf.

* * * * * 
From: Edward Harding

There is a good website containing information on Major General Bryan Grimes of Pitt County, North Carolina, and also excepts of letters home to his wife.  The website can be
found at http://docsouth.unc.edu/grimes/grimes.html   

If anyone is interested in finding books on the War, especially hard to find or out of print books,  they may want to check these two sites:

Abebooks.com
http://www.abebooks.com 

Clayton Thompson Bookseller
http://www.civilwarmall.com/bookseller/main.htm 

NOTE from Jayne  General Grimes is the Great Grandfather of Mr. Harding's wife.

* * * * *
From:  US-Civil-War maillist

"2 Women who are experts on black Civil War Regiment meet"
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/military/20040530-9999-1m30civilwar.html  

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From:   bitsobluengray

Online Civil War Records, Indexes & Rosters
http://www.militaryindexes.com/civilwar/ 

Online Military Indexes & Records
http://www.militaryindexes.com/

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FROM OUR READERS
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If your ancestor has or you have a story to tell, please send it to us.  
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill   
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com   

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: An Madra Rua

Old Fashioned Taffy Pull
2-1/2 cups sugar
1-1/2 cups light corn syup
4 teaspoons white vinegar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup evaporated milk
Combine sugar, syrup, vinegar and salt in a large, heavy saucepan over low heat, Stir untill the sugar dissolves, cover with a lid briefly to get any sugar crystals off the sides of the pan.  Bring to a boil, stirring constantly.

Add milk in a thin stream, stirring constantly.  Cook to firm ball stage (248*F/120*C), or untill a small amount of mixture is dropped into cold water and forms a ball that holds until pressed.  Remove from heat.
Pour mixture onto a buttered marble slab or similar surface.  As soon as outside edges cool enough to touch, take a small portion of the candy and start stretching or pulling.  Use on the tips of your (greased) fingers.  Pull until taffy becomes light in color and is no longer sticky.

Twist each pulled strip slightly and place on waxed paper.  When all the candy is pulled, cut each piece into about 1-inch pieces.  Wrap each piece in waxed paper and twist ends.  Store in covered container at room temperature.  Makes about 100 pieces.

Variation:   For Brown Sugar Taffy, substitute 2-1/4 cups firmly packed brown sugar for the sugar.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From:  MM3C11259 

The following was written by Capt Pettit who when captured was in the 120th NY infantry, Co F commander. Pettit was captured in the Wilderness in June, 1864. He was 39 when he enlisted.

DESCRIPTION OF ENVELOPE
Addressed to: James B. Smillie
                     No. 20, West 41st Street
                     New York
From: Capt Gilbert Pettit
         Prisoner of War
         near Columbia, S.C.
Across top center of envelope: By Flag of Truce
Postage stamps- left to right, top right
1. .03 U.S. Stamp
2. .10 Confederate Stamp
Note: Confederate stamps were not valid for delivery of mail in the U.S. A U.S. 
          stamp had to be affixed to this letter once it passed the lines for it to be
          delivered to the NY addressee
Postmarks (3)
1. Target style- no lettering cancelling U.S. stamp
2. Partially illegible postmark cancelling both the U.S. and Confederate stamps 
     specifying CHARL( rest illegible)- Charleston?
Note: the above postmarks had to be applied after the letter was delivered to Union
          hands.
3. Clear postmark to the left of stamps- PORT ROYAL S.C. Nov 21 ' 64
Notation at the bottom of the envelope- Rec'd New York Nov 26th 1864

LETTER
Written on 4x8" lined paper similar to that used by children
                                                                      Camp Military Prison near
Dear Cousin,                                                    Columbia, S.C. Oct 27, 1864

I wrote you on the 12th inst to send me a box of provision. For fear you did not get my letter I write again. If you have not sent it you will confer a great favor if you will do so.
I would like a blanker or two of some kind, some socks, a pair of shoes ------- 8 and a little underclothing and a cheap overcoat. As for the provision, send such as you think best. A ham, sugar and coffee would go good. Perhaps you could send me some can fruit and meat but use your own judgement. I would also like a cheap carpet bag to carry things we have. If we are exchanged soon, I will not need these things. Perhaps (name illegible) and some of the rest will help you get it up. Frank is still in the hospital at Charleston. The last I heard from him (10 days ago) he was improving. My health is very good. We are prisoners at a camp near --------?-----------
Prison, near Columbia, S.C. address per Flag of Truce----------?-------- Hilton Head, care of Gen'l Shafter. Send paper and envelopes.
Give my love to all. Hoping Imay have the pleasure of meeting you soon, I remain affectionately                                                     
                                                                               Gilbert

NOTE from MM3C   
  Jayne- did some research to find out Pettit's Regiment, Co and when he was captured. Perhaps you can add a postscript to this letter regarding the camp name which was unreadable, possibly the General referred to ( Was fairly unreadable- my best attempt of Shauter, or Thauter was Shafter. Also whether he survived the war. Wonder who the Frank was he mentioned?
Regards Ted

NOTE FROM Jayne.......     After the last newsletter was sent out, I received this information from IllinoisCW...  

The name of the Civil War prison, of stockade style, was Camp Sorghum.  There were also prisoners held at the state penitentiary as well as the state arsenal.   It was a questionable act, holding POWs as prisoners in state penitentiaries but both sides did so.  It was very questioned in regard to holding them at an arsenal.  John Hunt Morgan was held prisoner at the Ohio State Pen.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From:  An Madra Rua

This is my source:  http://dcwl.com/~dave/underwood.html  

PART 6....... April 1865

Albert Underwood Civil War Diary

Sun. Apr. 24: We were wakened this morning at 3 oclock by cannonading. Harnessed and ready to move by day. The firing grew pretty fierce and we were ordered to move forward. We took position about 7 1/2 oclock but the Rebs got whipped by 8, so that we moved forward about 8 1/2 oclock. Crossed the Cain river on pontoon, made several halts, took up pontoon. Rebs followed to river but kept under cover. Pine country all the way to Cotile Landing which we reached about 10 oclock and went into camp. 
Mon. Apr. 25: Left camp a 11 oclock and went round by Henderson's Hill on account of a bridge being burnt on the road. A little skirmishing this morning. The gunboats and the 3rd Battery shelled the woods some just as we passed Cotile Landing Bridge. Beautiful weather. Road good but very dusty. Two squadrons of cavalry went down the river road. Went into camp at 5 oclock on bayou rapides in about 15 miles of Alexandria. 
Tues. Apr. 26: Left camp at 6 oclock. Had only got about 3 miles when skirmishing commenced again in our rear. We turned off the road about 400 yards into the edge of the woods and masked our battery and forces and in about 2 hours the cavalry had drawed them on in range of our right flank when they raised and poured in a valley, but they had discovered the trap and skedaddled a little too soon for us. The 3rd Battery shelled them a little as they went. Reached Alexandria about 5 oclock. Reinforcements came up today. 
Wed. Apr. 27: Warm and cloudy this morning. There was an attack on this place while we were gone above. The Rebs came up on the other side of the river. Our men soon made them skedaddle. The river is full of boats now. Some of the gunboats are above the rapids and can't get below. Heard the gunboats firing all day and also at midnight. Went up to the 21st camp this morning. 
Thurs. Apr. 28: Uncomfortably warm today. Received orders about 2 oclock to get under arms immediately. Moved back about a quarter of a mile and formed a line of battle and remained in position all night. A strong line was formed resting on the river on our left flank and on the bayou above town on our right flank. Several buildings are to be seen burning along up the bayou tonight. Everything passed off quiet tonight. 
Fri. Apr. 29: Remained in position till 8 oclock and then went back to our respective camps. Quite warm today. Everything is quiet today with the exception of the 13th Army Corps moving their camp nearer town. I went up to the 1st Heavy Artillery camp this evening to see the boys. George Deverter came down with me. Wrote some letters today. Any amount of hucksters and bake shop in town now. 
Sat. Apr. 30: Received orders to harness and put up one days rations. It was the intention to go across the river and assist in getting off some cotton that was over there. We stood harnessed all day but did not move. Got orders to unharness about dark. Very warm weather. The boats were ordered to coal up last evening. Rather still, lonesome times here. Just at the present time many of the boys are fishing for pastime.

Continued next week.................

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
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If you have a resource from which you would be willing to do look-ups for folks, please let us know and we'll add it here

NEW!!!!!  UBucket@aol.com has offered to do free Civil War research from veterans from Wisconsin.  He is the author of "Civil War Veterans of Winnebago County, Wisconsin"

eharding2@cox.net has offered to do lookups for folks with ancestors from the Confederacy, focusing mainly on North Carolina, but has other sources also.  

GoldHobo@aol.com has told us if anyone wants info the the 85th NY Inf. Regt. (Plymouth Pilgrims) you may email her.  She has a book about them.    Her one request is that you put 85th Regt. in the subject line so she doesn't delete it by mistake

JLawson656@aol.com has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email. 

GandMS@aol.com  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you. 

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin/frye@gnat.net  does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html  

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com  Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

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"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
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If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html 


JUNE is a very active month for Living Histories and Reenactments so be sure to check the Website  
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0604.html    


June 3-6 Annual Blue and Gray Reunion, Civil War Weekend in Philippi, WV. Event includes much living history, medical scenarios, period music, encampments, demonstrations, parades, skirmishes and a reenactment at 2 pm Sunday. Saturday activities include artillery demonstration at 11 am; skirmish 1 pm at the bridge; Civil War Ball 8 pm. Most activities are free. 304-457-4265 or 304-457-5183. 

June 5-6 Blue and Gray Days at Point Lookout State Park, MD. Living history drills and programs and demonstrations and exhibits about life at the prisoner-of-war camp. 11 am-4 pm Saturday and 11 am-3 pm Sunday. Free with paid park fees. 301-872-5688. 

Sat. June 5 & Sun., June 6  Pennypacker Mills, Schwenksville, PA  Civil War Reunion Weekend  A must-see experience for the entire family as you emerge yourselves into the Civil War era to see an authentic military encampment, period music and fashion, guest speakers, living history demonstrations, sutlers, artillery, and battle scenes.  Ongoing activities both days.  On-site parking and refreshments available.  No pets, please.  Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  No charge.   

June 12-13 Reenactment and living history weekend commemorating the 140th anniversary of the Battle of Trevilian Station in Louisa County, VA (between Charlottesville and Richmond). Camps open 9 am-5 pm Saturday, 10 am-4 pm Sunday. Demonstrations, plantation house tours and other programs scheduled. Adult tickets: $10 daily, $15 two-day. Site is located on Route 15, three miles south of Boswell Tavern (Routes 15 and 22). 540-832-2708 or email edcrebbs@yahoo.com 

June  26-27 Living history encampment and demonstrations by the 20th Maine and the US Sharpshooters at the Pennsylvania Memorial, Maryland troops in Pitzer Woods and Virginia soldiers at Spangler Spring in the Gettysburg National Military Park, PA. www.nps.gov/gett  or 717-334-1124 extension 422. 

JULY 17 & 18, Lancaster PA, Landis Valley: A Civil War Village
Take an unusual glimpse into history when you visit a Civil War-era Pennsylvania Dutch village that has been taken over by Union Troops. Hundreds of authentically dressed civilian and military re-enactors recreate a slice of 1860s life. Several informative seminars are offered both days. Books and other merchandise of special interest to Civil War buffs will be available at The Weathervane, Landis Valley Museum Store. Admission fee. Museum members admitted free.  Saturday & Sunday  10:00AM - 5:00PM 

September 3 - 5, 2004 New Jersey.....  Battle of Cedar Bridge, Lake Manahawkin, NJ     Last Battle of the American War of Independence
http://www.telecottage.com/staffordhist/cedarbridge.html 

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Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
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Time:   
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

June 1 & 2 - OPEN CHAT 

June 8 & 9 -  Our Special Songs, Letters, and Poems nights.  If you have something you would like to share, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne or HOST FMLY Bill.

June 15 & 16 - OPEN CHAT

June 22 & 23 - To be announced

June 29 & 30 - To be announced

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night.  

Jayne & Bill
Civil War Weekly Fireside Newsletter
http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/weekly_fireside_newsletter_archive.htm

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