May 2000 Weekly Firesides

Hear Ye .... Hear Ye 

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group; 
Distribution Coast to Coast 
Week ending 07 May 2000

Our Mission: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable online 
environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible.
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Well, I made it back to the chat room Thursday night and we had a great time in 
OPEN CHAT. I'm pretty much on the mend and feeling much better than the last two 
weeks. "Nuff" of that. 
We had some new faces at the fireside Thursday night. We hope to see you new 
folks become "regulars" or part of the "faithful" as we like to call them 

Music: I have a bit of music to share with you this week. For those who like 
traditional Irish/Celtic music I listened a CD called "the Chieftains Collection" which 
is a compilation of the very best of their claddagh years. It is indeed one worth 
listening to if you are of that musical inclination. Check down in "A Bit of Community" 
for some great musical humor this week. 
In a previous issue I had put out a question about "Who the Rooster Was in Disney's 
Robin Hood". Well I got a great response (Heh Heh ) from JRose that I had to share 
with you. 
Roger, Roger, on the wall 
Who's the greatest singer of all? 
I love to roller skate in a buffalo herd, 
Just to prove I am King of the Road. 
love it 
joan 
............Enjoy!
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Editor's Note: for those of you who are AOL members, I want to encourage you to 
feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, or Stories or articles that you have in 
our Civil War History Files. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you 
would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. Use 
"keyword=roots" to get to the Genealogy Main Screen. Then select Files, followed 
by selecting History and Culture and there you will find the two upload areas I 
mentioned; Civil War Files, and Civil War Photos. I would also note that the New 
Genealogy Forum Web Site is being constructed. On that Web Site, the Civil War 
History SIG will have an area to link to our Civil War Library (Lectures, Letters, 
Songs, Poems, Files, Firesides, and Photo's). When this is complete then anyone 
(not just AOL Members) will have access to all our material. We'll be sure to let you 
know when you can access it. 

This coming Thursday is Letters, Songs and Poems Night. One of our monthly 
favorites, so we envite you to join us around the fireside... there are plenty of places 
to sit and the hot apple cider can't be beat!! GFS HOST TEG (Tom) keeps a 
steamin' cider jar a'goin!!

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FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WE REALLY WELCOME YOU TO 
OUR MERRY BAND" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU, TRADING QUESTIONS AND 
COMMENTS AND ESPECIALLY YOUR CAMARADERIE!!! :-)... COME AGAIN 
OFTEN, WE DO INDEED "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.. 

Every first-timer to the American Civil War History SIG gets put on the newsletter 
distribution automatically, because we like to send you a "Thank You Card" for 
coming to visit and this is our way of doing so. We hope to give you an opportunity 
to jump right in with us. If you desire NOT to receive the newsletter, then just drop us 
an email saying UNSUBSCRIBE and we will quickly remove your screen name from 
distribution. We certainly don't want to clog your mailbox with unwanted material. 
Also many of you pass on the newsletter to others that don't subscribe to AOL. We 
really want to thank you for spreading the word. I would also like to let you know that 
we would be happy to add them to our list if they have email of any sort. We 
distribute everywhere to those that have requested it. AOL membership is not a 
requirement although we'd love to see you in the Chat Room:D 

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THE HELP DESK 
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This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday 
night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check 
it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots," 
after which will bring you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the 
"Files Library Center," then "History Files". At that point select "Civil War Files." 
Lectures and the Letters, Songs and Poems evenings are also posted in the "Files 
Library Center" under "History Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" 
when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the New Files section are 
posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting Logs and Newsletters". 

Weekly Web Sites we've received 
From: NPeter2089 
Identifying Military uniforms 
Hi{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{ Jim.}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}} Found this on Rootsweb.Might be fun 
for those of us who have kin who were in wars other than the BIG ONE (CW of 
course). My maternal grgrandfather, on my mother's side was in the Mexican War. 
Identifying Military uniforms: 
http://carlisle-www.army.mil/usamhi/ 
U.S. Air Force Museum: 
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/museum/ 
Sources for identifying symbols on military markers: 
Continental Society Sons of Indian Wars: 
http://members.tripod.com/~CSSIW 
Descendants of Mexican War Veterans: 
http://www.dmwv.org/ 
General Society of Colonial Wars: 
http://www.ubalt.edu/gscw 
General Society of the War of 1812: 
http://LanClio.org/1812.htm 
National Society of the Children of the American Revolution: 
http://www.nscar.org/ 
National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution: 
http://www.dar.org/index.html 
Order of Indian Wars of the United States: 
http://members.tripod.com/~Historic_Trust/indian.htm 
National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution: 
http://www.sar.org/ 
Spanish-American War Sources: 
The Spanish American War Centennial: 
http://www.spanam.simplenet.com/ 
Spanish-American War Site: 
http://www.ecsis.net/~jrwilobe/ 
Texas Volunteers - Spanish American War Military Rolls 1898-1901: 
http://www.pcworld.com/r/tw/1%2C2061%2Ctw-gen0214m%2C00.html 
The 1836 Texas War of Independence: 
Military Research Room: 
http://www.lineages.com/military/mil_tx.asp 
The Daughters of the Republic of Texas Library @ the Alamo (research 
services): 
http://www.drtl.org/ 
Seige and Battle of the Alamo: 
http://www.lsjunction.com/events/alamo.htm 
Descendants of Mexican War Veterans: 
http://www.dmwv.org/ 
USIGS Military Collection Mexican-American War: 
http://www.pcworld.com/r/tw/1%2C2061%2Ctw-gen0214a%2C00.html 
Mexican American War Memorial: 
http://sunsite.unam.mx/revistas/1847/ 
Lost Records of the War of 1812: 
http://pcworld.com/r/tw/1%2C2061%2Ctw-gen0214c%2C00.html 
Military History: War of 1812: 
http://www.cfcsc.dnd.ca/links/milhist/1812.html 
USIGS Collection of Links: 
http://www.pcworld.com/r/tw/1%2C2061%2Ctw-gen0214e%2C00.html 
Where to get War of 1812 Records: 
http://www.rootsweb.com/~kyharris/1812how.htm 
War of 1812 Pay Rolls and Muster Rolls (searchable collection): 
http://image.vtls.com/collections/WA.html 
War of 1812: Fort McHenry: 
http://www.bcpl.lib.md.us/~etowner/patriots.html 
Overview of the War of 1812 from a Canadian perspective: 
http://www.rootsweb.com/~canmil/1812/1812view.htm 
The Patriots War of 1837-1838: 
Fort Wellington, Canada: 
http://www.pcworld.com/r/tw/1%2C2061%2Ctw-gen0214u%2C00.html 
The Battle of the Windmill: 
http://www.pcworld.com/r/tw/1%C2061%2Ctw-gen0214n%2C00.html 

{{{{Nadine}}}} Thanks cousin :D

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From: frye@gnat.net 
The following are corrections to some miss-spellings in the last posting... 
Kevin 

http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html 
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/Descendants.html 

"Kevin" - Thanks for the update. You can send email to him at: frye@gnat.net 

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MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!.. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, 
to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and 
we will post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near 
vicinity, and are willing to assist can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and 
work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs 
and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" 
assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). 
Do unto others as.... you know :-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can 
share them in the "Fireside"!! 
GFS Jim
IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO 
LET US KNOW!!!!! 
Thanks!! - The Editors

We have had some gracious members offer their assistance in this area. Their screen 
names and areas they have offered to help in are listed.... Please honor their 
"goodness" and don't abuse them :-).... We ask that you do follow the guidelines 
indicated above.... 

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY... 
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Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, 
Feedback's, Items of Interest and Plea's for HELP...


From: Ker car 2 
Thanks so much for a wonderfully helpful newsletter this week! I have just about finished my 
United Daughters of the Confederacy papers and was pleased to note now many soldiers from 
BOTH sides I have in my family's past! Thanks again for letting me share the news of the 
meetings even if I do snooze through the "real" ones! 
Linda 

{{{Linda}}}} You're entirely welcome. Thanks for the note. 
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A good snicker from Joan...... 
From: JRose10700 
Some friars were behind in their belfry payments, so they opened a small 
florist shop to raise the funds. Since everyone liked to buy flowers from 
the men of God, the rival florist across town thought the competition was 
unfair. 
He asked the good fathers to close down, but they would not. He went back 
and begged the friars to close. They ignored him. He asked his mother to 
go ask the friars to get out of business. They ignored her. So, the rival 
florist hired Hugh Mac Taggart, the roughest and most vicious thug in 
town to "persuade" them to close. Hugh beat up the friars and trashed 
their store, saying he'd be back if they didn't close shop. Terrified, 
the friars did so. 

The Moral of the Story: 
Hugh, and only Hugh, can prevent florist friars !! 

{{Joan}} I love it. LOL 
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From: FI WATROUS 
Jim - Any music lover will find this hilarious - you don't have to be Lutheran, too. However, as a 
Lutheran, I find it doubly hilarious. 
Nancy 

The Young Lutheran's Guide to the Orchestra 
by Garrison Keillor 
To each person, God gives some talent such as comedy, 
just to name one, or the ability to suffer, and to some persons God has 
given musical talent, though not to as many as think so. So for a 
young Lutheran considering an orchestral career, the first question to 
ask yourself is, "Do I have a genuine God-given talent, or do I only seem 
talented compared to other young Lutherans?" 
Because most Lutherans aren't musicians, they're choir members. 
Mostly altos and basses. And they can be sure that their gift is 
God-given, because who else but God would be interested? 
Nobody goes into choir music for the wrong reasons. 
But orchestra ... do you know what you're getting into? 
You're getting into opera for one thing. Don Juan and Mephistopheles, pagan 
goddesses screeching and being strangled and thrown off balconies. And 
even if you stick to concert music, where are the Christian composers? 
Modern ones are existentialists, the romantics were secular humanists, 
the 18th century was all rationalists, and the 17th were Italian except 
for Bach. And you can't make a living playing Bach. 
In the Bible, we read about people singing and playing 
musical instruments, including the harp, the last trump, the cymbal, 
the psaltery. But in the Bible, music was in praise of the Lord, not for 
amusement. We don't read that our Lord Himself ever played an instrument 
or enjoyed hearing other people play theirs. The apostles did not attend 
concerts. They weren't in the arts - maybe there's a reason for that. You 
play in an orchestra, you're going to be devoting your life to music that 
sort of swirls around in spiritual mystery. Searching for answers 
that people could find in the Epistle to the Romans if somebody just showed 
them where it is. 
But if you're determined to play in an orchestra, then you ought to ask 
yourself, "Which instrument is the best one for a Lutheran to play?" Which 
instrument would our Lord have chosen, assuming He played an instrument? 
And assuming He was Lutheran. 
Probably not a French horn: The French horn takes too much of a person's 
life. French horn players hardly have time to marry and have children. The French 
horn is practically a religious belief all by itself. In some orchestras, the 
horn players are required to be celibate - sometimes by their wives. Because 
they think about the horn all the time anyway. 
Should a Lutheran play the bassoon? Not if you want to be taken seriously, 
I don't think so. The name kind of says it all: bassoon. It's an instrument that isn't 
playing with a full deck of marbles. Maybe it's something you'd do for a hobby 
("Hey honey, let's go bassooning this weekend!"), but not as your life's 
work. Some bassoonists filling out applications for home loans just say 
"orthodontist." 
Many Lutherans start out playing clarinets in marching band and think 
of it as a pretty good instrument and kind of sociable. You pick up a 
clarinet, and you feel like getting together with other people and 
forming an "M." But the symphonic clarinet is different: clever, sarcastic, 
kind of snooty. It's a nice small town instrument that went to college and 
after that you can't get a simple answer out of them. It is a French 
instrument, you know. Ever wonder why there are no French Lutherans? 
Probably the wine wasn't good enough for them. 
The oboe is the sensualist of the woodwind section, and if there is one wind 
Lutherans should avoid, it's probably this one. In movie soundtracks, you 
tend to hear the oboe when the woman is taking her clothes off. Also a little 
later when she asks the man for a cigarette. You start playing the oboe, 
you're going to have babies, take my word for it. 
The English horn sounds Christian, maybe because we think of it as the 
Anglican horn, but it's so mournful, so plaintive. And so are English horn 
players. They all have deep complicated problems. They're all down in the 
dumps, especially at night, which is when most concerts are. Maybe because 
they want what oboists have, I don't know. 
The flute is the show-off of the wind section, the big shot: Jean-Pierre 
Rampal, James Galway - both millionaires. (How many millionaire bassoonists 
can you name real fast?) Well, that's fine. Everybody knows it's the 
hardest, blowing across a tiny hole with your head tilted all your life: 
it's like soloing on a pop bottle. The problem with the flute is that it vibrates 
your brain, and you start wearing big white caftans and smocks and eat 
roots and berries. You become a pantheist and sit in meadows, and you 
believe that all is one and God is everything - God is a column of air 
vibrating - and you know that's not right. 
The last member of the woodwind family is the flakiest 
and that's the piccolo. It's never in tune. 
Never has been, never will be. All you can play with it is the blues. Which, 
being a Lutheran, we don't have anyway. 
We come now to the string section. Strings are mentioned 
in scripture and some young Christians are tempted to become string players. 
But you want to be careful. Bass, for example. 
A very deliberate instrument, the plow horse of the orchestra: and bass 
players do tend to be more methodical, not so spontaneous or witty or 
brilliant necessarily, but reliable. Which makes the instrument appealing 
to German Lutherans. And yet bass notes do have a certain texture and a 
tone, a darkness, a depth that - my gosh, when you see those guys pick up 
their bows back there, doesn't it make you think the same thing that I do? 
And if we do, just think what they're thinking about... 
The 'cello section seems pleasant, and cellists seem like such nice people. 
The way they put their arms around their instruments, they look like parents 
at a day care center zipping up snowsuits. They seem like us: comfortable, 
mid-range, able to see both sides of things. And yet, there's something about 
the cello that's hard to put your fingers on. It just doesn't seem right. 
Maybe, it's the way they hold the instrument the way they do. Why can't 
they hold it across their laps? Or beside themselves? I'm only asking. 
The viola section is no place for a Lutheran and here you have to take my 
word for it, because I know violists and they're okay until late at night. 
They like to build a fire in a vacant lot and drink red wine and roast a 
chicken on a clothes hanger and talk about going to Mexico with somebody 
named Rita. Violists have this dark, moody, gypsy streak, especially when 
they get older, and they realize that their instrument for some reason cannot 
be heard beyond the stage. You think you hear the violas, but it's really the 
second violins. 
The first violin is a problem for a Christian because it's a solo virtuoso 
instrument and we Christians are humble and decent people. The first violins 
see the maestro look to them first, and most of them believe that he secretly 
takes his cue from watching their bows go up and down. The maestro, who has 
a great nimbus of hair and is here on a temporary work permit, is hypnotized 
by listening to the violins and forgets which page he's on and looks to the 
violins to find out what's going on - this is what most violinists believe in their 
hearts. That if the maestro dropped dead, the orchestra would just follow 
the violins while his little body was carried off into the wings, and nobody 
in the audience would notice any difference except that now they would 
have an unobstructed view of the violin section. Is this a place for a 
Lutheran to be? Did our Lord say "Blessed are they who stand up in front 
and take deep bows for they shall receive bigger fees?" No, He did not. 
The second violin section is attractive to Lutherans because these people 
are steady, supportive and helpful, but look who it is they help - they help 
out the first violins. You want to play second fiddle to that crowd? 
(No, I hope not.) One thing you may not know about second violins is that 
the parts are so easy they never practice and they wind up staying out late 
in singles bars on the freeway near the airport and dancing with software 
salesmen. But I guess that's their way. 
Let's be clear about one thing about the brass section. 
The rest of the orchestra wishes the brass were playing in another room. 
So does the conductor. His back is toward you so that you can't see what 
he's saying to them but what he's saying is, "Would you mind taking that 
thing outside?" The brass section is made up of men who were at one time 
in the construction trades. They went into music because the hours are 
better and there's less dust. They're heavy dudes and that's why composers 
wrote so few notes for them. Because after they play, you can't hear for 
a while. 
The tuba player is normally a stocky, bearded guy whose hobby is plumbing. 
The only member of the orchestra who bowls over 250 and gets his deer 
every year and changes his own oil. In his locker downstairs, he keeps a 
pair of lederhosen for free-lance jobs. Anyway, there's only one tuba in 
the bunch and he's it. 
The trombonist is a humorist, sort of the brother-in-law of the orchestra. 
He carries a water spray gun to keep his slide moist and often uses it 
against his neighbors. That's why they duck down back there. He's nobody 
you'd ever want to see become artistic director; you just hope he doesn't 
sit right behind you. 
The trumpet is the brass instrument you imagine as Christian, thinking of 
Gideon and Gabriel, and then you meet one in real life, and you realize how 
driven these people are. They don't want to wear black tie; they want to 
wear capes and swords and tassels; they want to play as loud as they can 
and see mallards drop from the ceiling. Of the people who've keeled over dead 
at orchestra concerts, most of them were killed by a long trumpet passage. 
And most of them were glad to go. 
There are two places in the orchestra for a Lutheran and one is the 
percussion section. It's the most Christian instrument there is. 
Percussionists are endlessly patient because they hardly ever get to play. 
Pages and pages of music go by when the violins are sawing away and the 
winds are tooting and the brass are blasting, and the percussionist sits 
there and counts the bars like a hunter in the blind waiting for a grouse 
to appear. A percussionist may have to wait for twenty minutes just to 
play a few beats, but those beats have to be exact, and they have to 
be passionate, climactic. All that the Epistles of Paul say a Christian 
should be - faithful, waiting, trusting, filled with fervor - are the 
qualities of the good percussionist. 
The other Lutheran instrument, of course, is the harp. 
It's a good instrument for any Christian because it keeps you humble and 
keeps you at home. You can't run around with a harp. Having one is like 
living with an elderly parent in very poor health: it's hard to get them 
in and out of cars, and it's hard to keep them happy. It takes fourteen 
hours to tune a harp, which remains in tune for about twenty minutes, or 
until somebody opens the door. It's an instrument for a saint. If a 
harpist could find a good percussionist, they wouldn't need anybody else. 
They could settle down and make perfectly good music, just the two of them. 


{{{{{{{Nancy}}}}}}}} I absolutely loved this and I'm still laughing. Garrison Kiellor 
(from the Lake Wobegone series) is absolutely incredible. Thanks for sharing.. I'll be 
chuckling for weeks over this one. Give IKE a big hug from all of us and tell him to get 
well..... 
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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by 
talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil 
War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of. 

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it 
so well.
"I think it is a noble and pious thing 
To do whatever we may by written 
Word or molded bronze and sculpted 
Stone to keep our memories, our 
Reverence and our love alive and 
To hand them on to new generations 
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to 
address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth 
(as we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we 
dedicate one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So 
come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a 
full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the 
Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into 
discussions on this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution 
for this "Weekly Fireside." 

AND AGAIN TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We really "fire up" with what members bring to 
the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire 
to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif," just drop us a line and we will comply 
with your wishes "poste- haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events***** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with hosts LDRS GFH 
Amy, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Jim and our many faithful friends 
:) 

05/11/2000 - Our special "Letters, Songs and Poems Night" - don't forget to send yours in. 
We'll be sure to read them :D 

05/18/2000 - Another story in the Women in the Civil War Series - Emma Sansom - 
Guide (HOST GFS Jim) I have long been fascinated by the story of this lady and General 
Nathan Bedford Forrest. You won't want to miss this one. 

05/25/2000 - Open Chat 

06/01/2000 - Another story in the Women in the Civil War Series...... 

06/08/2000 - Our special "Letters, Songs and Poems Night" - don't forget to send yours in. 
We'll be sure to read them :D 

06/15/2000 - OPEN CHAT 

We'll See You Thursday Night..! 
Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host's/Hostess's :-) 
HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and LDRS GFH Amy

"The Weekly Fireside"
American Civil War History Special Interest Group

Submitted by the Civil War Team: 
Host GFS Jim, Host GFS Jayne, Host GFS TEG and Ldrs GFH Amy

Edited by Host GFS Gary

Mission Statement: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable online environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible.

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War".

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment said it so well.

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Submitters Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots," after which will bring you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center," then "History Files". At that point select "Civil War Files." Lectures and the Letters, Songs and Poems evenings are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting Logs and Newsletters".

I've also posted ALL the "Weekly Firesides" we've done since the first of the year (2000) into the Genealogy Forum's New Files area for your enjoyment. Give GFA Terry a few days to get them posted and then grab what you want. All New Files are uploaded to the New Files Area for about 30 days and then they will be moved to their proper archive. In the case of the Weekly Firesides, you'll find them in the Files Library under Newsletters. 

Bits of Blue and Gray

Just a note to let you  know the new Bits of Blue and Gray column is now available to read.

 This month's column is "A Dedication"
Bits of Blue and Gray - June 2000 

http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/june2000.htm 

I hope you're enjoying the trivia questions and learning from them.  If any of you have trivia questions I could use, I sure do wish you'd send them to me along with the answers and a source verifying it... unless you don't mind if I use your screen name as the source.  At the site you'll also find a Message Board where you can leave suggestions, ask questions and make comments.

Host GFS Jayne

For other columns and genealogical information go to StateGenSites http://www.stategensites.com (Site no longer in existance.)

Members Helping Members!

Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near vicinity, and are willing to assist can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). Do unto others as.... you know :-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can share them in the "Fireside"!!

Host GFS Jim

IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO LET US KNOW!!!!!

Thanks!! - The Editors

 
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A Bit of Community

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Editor's Note: For those of you who are AOL members, I want to encourage you to feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, Stories or articles that you have in our Civil War History Files. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. Use "keyword=roots" to get to the Genealogy Main Screen. Then select Files, followed by selecting History and Culture and there you will find the two upload areas I mentioned: Civil War Files, and Civil War Photos. I would also note that the New Genealogy Forum Web Site is being constructed. On that Web Site, the Civil War History SIG will have an area to link to our Civil War Library (Lectures, Letters, Songs, Poems, Files, Firesides, and Photos). When this is complete then anyone (not just AOL Members) will have access to all our material. We'll be sure to let you know when you can access it.

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WE REALLY WELCOME YOU TO OUR MERRY BAND."  WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU, TRADING QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS AND ESPECIALLY YOUR CAMARADERIE!!! :-)... COME AGAIN OFTEN, WE DO INDEED "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY..

Every first-timer to the American Civil War History SIG gets put on the newsletter distribution automatically, because we like to send you a "Thank You Card" for coming to visit and this is our way of doing so. We hope to give you an opportunity to jump right in with us. If you desire NOT to receive the newsletter, then just drop us an email saying UNSUBSCRIBE and we will quickly remove your screen name from distribution. We certainly don't want to clog your mailbox with unwanted material. Also many of you pass on the newsletter to others that don't subscribe to AOL. We really want to thank you for spreading the word. I would also like to let you know that we would be happy to add them to our list if they have email of any sort.  We distribute everywhere to those that have requested it. AOL membership is not a requirement although we'd love to see you in the Chat Room :D

AND AGAIN TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

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May's Special Features and Articles

Visiting the Harold B. Simpson History Research Complex

Submitted by JRose

[Submitter's Note:  The Following is from our friend JRose10700. She had the opportunity to visit the Harold B. Simpson History Research Complex on the campus of Hill College, in Hillsboro, TX.. You'll get the impression she really did enjoy her visit which wasn't near long enough!!!!!]

Set me in the middle of a room with more than 5,000 volumes written about some phase of the War Between the States, toss in several thousand photographs, maps and archives of original handwritten letters, documents and diaries. Show me a well-lighted table on which to work and a computer nearby for electronic assistance of service records and the like --

And it is a dream come true.

Almost.

Restrict me to only two and half hours in the morning and two hours in the afternoon to spend there, and it almost becomes a nightmare. (As if such a plethora of research books could ever constitute a nightmare!) It is one of those places you would like to hide in the stacks and let them lock you in for the night. No way can you exhaust your search for even one ancestor in that length of time with so much to browse through. 

It is a 400-mile journey from my home to Hillsboro, Texas, a small town just off I 35 south of Dallas. There on the campus of Hill College is the Harold B. Simpson History Research Complex which houses the largest collection of research materials on the war in the Southwest as well as a Blue Gray Museum with war artifacts, a military museum and other exhibits well worth browsing.

Information on Texans is most extensive - but that's all right with me since most of my CW ancestors and their brothers, uncles and cousins were Texans.

It also has many maps and scores of photographs of both civilian and military leaders in Texas during that period. A microfilm library includes the compiled service records of all Texas Confederate soldiers, Texas newspapers published during the War, census records of Central Texas counties and post returns of frontiers forts in Texas. Resources, however, are not limited to Texas or even to Confederates. There is much for a Union researcher to dig through as well.

The Research Center was established in 1963, and over the years it has grown from a small cramped building to a large spacious library and museum with plenty of room to grow. And grow it is doing. Only this past year did it acquire more than 3,000 books dealing with World War I and World War II.

When I was there several years ago, when it occupied smaller quarters, I made extensive use of the microfilm records, looking up the eight Sharp brothers and cousins, six of whom failed to return to their home in Limestone County when the fighting was over. I found material that told me how tall they were, what condition their private guns were in when they enlisted, and where they were captured or met their deaths or suffered their wounds.

On this most recent visit I concentrated on searching for a great-grandfather who had crossed Mississippi from his home in Alabama to enlist in the cavalry at Vicksburg. With the help of Peggy Fox, director of the Research Center, I found all kinds of information. Ms. Fox has been with the research center for 17 years, and is knowledgeable, personable and extremely helpful.

I purchased a copy (for $5) of the capsule history of Wirt Adams Cavalry, with which he served all through the war. It listed all the battles, engagements, raids and movements from its formation in Vicksburg in 1861 until the brigade was surrendered at Citronelle, Ala., in May 1865. A similar capsule history can be ordered by mail for $8 on any regiment -- Confederate or Union -- or in some cases batteries, along with a map marking each major engagement. Believe me, it is well worth it. 

By the time I had read 15 pages of a narrative in a Mississippi publication, it was lunchtime. When I returned (after locking my keys in the car and having to call AAA out to get me moving again) Peggy had looked up several additional sources of information. Copies made from books and manuscripts are only 10 cents each - and my bill came to $15.20. (Cash or check -- no credit cards).

Adding spice for me - my great-grandfather had come to Texas after he was paroled and eventually settled in Hill County. I found his grave not 15 miles from the center. I debated on spending another night there. Motels are less than a mile away along the Interstate and are very reasonable. I had already been gone two days longer than I had expected because of great success in root digging elsewhere, and with great regret I folded up my notebook at 3 o'clock and headed back to Tulsa.

But definitely, most definitely, I will be back.

This Heritage Center now attracts researchers and students from around the world as its renown spreads. Colonel Simpson said in a speech at its dedication in 1963 "What you see here today, of course, is only the small beginning of the Center, but as the old adage goes, 'Large Oaks from small Acorns grow', and it is our fervent hope that this center, will in the years to come, grow into this mighty Oak of Knowledge, Research, Perpetuation and writing of Texas Confederate History." 

Today the Harold B. Simpson History Complex is comprised of three separate divisions: the Texas Heritage Museum, the Research Center (dealing with researching the War Between the States), and the Hill College Press. The Press has published some 30 titles pertaining to the war. A list currently offered for sale may be found on the Heritage web site - crc. 

On the web site also may be found a form for ordering information on any individual soldier of the war, again either Confederate or Union. Like an order from the National archives, cost may vary, according to amount of material found. The heavy mail order business, Ms. Fox said, is the reason for the shortened open hours. The limited staff is busy answering the mail.

There is a $2 fee for using the facilities, but if you are there in the morning you may return in the afternoon for free. The research center is open Monday through Friday. The Texas Heritage Museum explores the experiences of Texans during wartime. It houses the Texas Confederate Museum Collection of the UDC. This collection is one of the finest holdings of Confederate artifacts in the Southwest. It is open for longer hours Monday through Saturday, with a $4 admission fee. 

Another phase of the museum is devoted to guns and military ordnance, while still another division honors that well-remembered Texas hero of World War II, Audie Murphy. 

Again, the web site is at http://hillcollege.hill-college.cc.tx.us/crc/crc.htm 

Dr. B. D. Patterson, Dean, receives e-mail at patterson@hill-college.cc.tx.us

Postal address to which requests for capsule histories or individual lookups may be sent is 
Hill College History Complex 
B.D. Patterson, Dean 
P.O. Box 619 
Hillsboro, Texas 76645
(254) 582-2555 Ext.258

{{{{{{Joan}}}}}}} What a great place. Almost makes me sorry I don't have Southern Roots d:)

From: Anakeda
Thanks for sharing JRose 10700 info on the Harold B. Simpson History Research Complex. I plan to order info on 4 of my CW ancestors. Thanks for passing on such a great lead!!
Ann 

{{{Ann}}} We're plumb tickled to death when something "connects" with one of you readers. Thanks for the Note.... Jayne, Amy, Tom and Jim

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Grace-Marie Hackwell Seminar

Submitted by VFTurner2


The San Mateo County Genealogical Society has announced that they are sponsoring a half-day seminar, featuring Grace-Marie Hackwell, noted Civil War Historian. The Seminar will be on Saturday, July 15, 2000 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at the First Presbyterian Church of San Mateo, located at the corner of Hacienda and 25th Avenue, in San Mateo. She will present two topics: (1) Locating Your Civil War Soldier, Find out if YOUR ancestor served in the Civil War, and (2) Writing Your Civil War Soldier’s Military History, Learn how to use the information in your soldier’s military service and pension records.

Grace-Marie has been a Family Historian/Genealogist for over 30 years. She currently is an Educator and Genealogical Instructor Specializing in Civil War Research (Cabrillo College, Aptos, CA.,) and Regional Director, California State Genealogical Alliance (South Central Coast). She served 7 years as Director of the Family History Center (Santa Cruz, CA) and was the Founding President of the Pajaro Valley Genealogical Society. Grace-Marie also is a Past President, Northern CA. Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society. She has written two books, A Guide to Locating Your Civil War Soldier and The Family History Time Line, authors and maintains a number of web sites about Civil War regiments, including the 4th, 51st, 66th and 142nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry and the 1st Mass. and 15th Penn. Cavalries. And if that is not enough, she arranges and escorts genealogical research tours including annual trips to Salt Lake City, Utah.

The cost of the seminar is $10 for members of SMCGS, $12 for non-members and $13 at the door. Reservations may be made by sending a check made out to: SMCGS: Hackwell Seminar, and mail it to HACKWELL SEMINAR, P.O. Box 5083, San Mateo, CA 94402-0058.

{{{{{Vern}}}}} Thanks for passing this on to us


Submitters NOTE: I received the following note from Vern this week

I just wanted to thank you for including my announcement in last week's Fireside.

{{{{{Vern}}}}} We're happy to do it!!!!! 

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The Young Lutheran's Guide to the Orchestra

By Garrison Keillor

Submitted by FI WATROUS

Jim - Any music lover will find this hilarious - you don't have to be Lutheran, too. However, as a Lutheran, I find it doubly hilarious.
Nancy 

To each person, God gives some talent such as comedy, just to name one, or the ability to suffer, and to some persons God has given musical talent, though not to as many as think so. So for a young Lutheran considering an orchestral career, the first question to ask yourself is, "Do I have a genuine God-given talent, or do I only seem talented compared to other young Lutherans?" Because most Lutherans aren't musicians, they're choir members. Mostly altos and basses. And they can be sure that their gift is God-given, because who else but God would be interested? Nobody goes into choir music for the wrong reasons.  But orchestra ... do you know what you're getting into?  You're getting into opera for one thing. Don Juan and Mephistopheles, pagan goddesses screeching and being strangled and thrown off balconies. And even if you stick to concert music, where are the Christian composers?  Modern ones are existentialists, the romantics were secular humanists, the 18th century was all rationalists, and the 17th were Italian except for Bach. And you can't make a living playing Bach.

In the Bible, we read about people singing and playing musical instruments, including the harp, the last trump, the cymbal, the psaltery. But in the Bible, music was in praise of the Lord, not for amusement. We don't read that our Lord Himself ever played an instrument or enjoyed hearing other people play theirs. The apostles did not attend concerts. They weren't in the arts - maybe there's a reason for that. You play in an orchestra, you're going to be devoting your life to music that sort of swirls around in spiritual mystery. Searching for answers that people could find in the Epistle to the Romans if somebody just showed them where it is. 

But if you're determined to play in an orchestra, then you ought to ask yourself, "Which instrument is the best one for a Lutheran to play?" Which instrument would our Lord have chosen, assuming He played an instrument? 

And assuming He was Lutheran. 

Probably not a French horn: The French horn takes too much of a person's life.  French horn players hardly have time to marry and have children. The French horn is practically a religious belief all by itself. In some orchestras, the horn players are required to be celibate - sometimes by their wives. Because they think about the horn all the time anyway.

Should a Lutheran play the bassoon? Not if you want to be taken seriously, I don't think so. The name kind of says it all: bassoon. It's an instrument that isn't playing with a full deck of marbles. Maybe it's something you'd do for a hobby ("Hey honey, let's go bassooning this weekend!"), but not as your life's work. Some bassoonists filling out applications for home loans just say "orthodontist."

Many Lutherans start out playing clarinets in marching band and think of it as a pretty good instrument and kind of sociable. You pick up a clarinet, and you feel like getting together with other people and forming an "M." But the symphonic clarinet is different: clever, sarcastic, kind of snooty. It's a nice small town instrument that went to college and after that you can't get a simple answer out of them. It is a French instrument, you know. Ever wonder why there are no French Lutherans?  Probably the wine wasn't good enough for them.

The oboe is the sensualist of the woodwind section, and if there is one wind  Lutherans should avoid, it's probably this one. In movie soundtracks, you tend to hear the oboe when the woman is taking her clothes off. Also a little later when she asks the man for a cigarette. You start playing the oboe, you're going to have babies, take my word for it.

The English horn sounds Christian, maybe because we think of it as the Anglican horn, but it's so mournful, so plaintive. And so are English horn players. They all have deep complicated problems. They're all down in the dumps, especially at night, which is when most concerts are. Maybe because they want what oboists have, I don't know.

The flute is the show-off of the wind section, the big shot: Jean-Pierre Rampal, James Galway - both millionaires. (How many millionaire bassoonists can you name real fast?) Well, that's fine. Everybody knows it's the hardest, blowing across a tiny hole with your head tilted all your life: it's like soloing on a pop bottle. The problem with the flute is that it vibrates your brain, and you start wearing big white caftans and smocks and eat roots and berries. You become a pantheist and sit in meadows, and you believe that all is one and God is everything - God is a column of air vibrating - and you know that's not right.

The last member of the woodwind family is the flakiest and that's the piccolo. It's never in tune.  Never has been, never will be. All you can play with it is the blues. Which, being a Lutheran, we don't have anyway.

We come now to the string section. Strings are mentioned in scripture and some young Christians are tempted to become string players. But you want to be careful.

Bass, for example. A very deliberate instrument, the plow horse of the orchestra: and bass players do tend to be more methodical, not so spontaneous or witty or brilliant  necessarily, but reliable. Which makes the instrument appealing to German Lutherans. And yet bass notes do have a certain texture and a tone, a darkness, a depth that - my gosh, when you see those guys pick up their bows back there, doesn't it make you think the same thing that I do? 

And if we do, just think what they're thinking about...

The 'cello section seems pleasant, and cellists seem like such nice people.  The way they put their arms around their instruments, they look like parents at a day care center zipping up snowsuits. They seem like us: comfortable, mid-range, able to see both sides of things. And yet, there's something about the cello that's hard to put your fingers on. It just doesn't seem right. Maybe, it's the way they hold the instrument the way they do. Why can't they hold it across their laps? Or beside themselves? I'm only asking.

The viola section is no place for a Lutheran and here you have to take my word for it, because I know violists and they're okay until late at night. They like to build a fire in a vacant lot and drink red wine and roast a chicken on a clothes hanger and talk about going to Mexico with somebody named Rita. Violists have this dark, moody, gypsy streak, especially when they get older, and they realize that their instrument for some reason cannot be heard beyond the stage. You think you hear the violas, but it's really the second violins.

The first violin is a problem for a Christian because it's a solo virtuoso instrument and we Christians are humble and decent people. The first violins see the maestro look to  them first, and most of them believe that he secretly takes his cue from watching their bows go up and down. The maestro, who has a great nimbus of hair and is here on a temporary work permit, is hypnotized by listening to the violins and forgets which page he's on and looks to the violins to find out what's going on - this is what most violinists believe in their hearts. That if the maestro dropped dead, the orchestra would just follow the violins while his little body was carried off into the wings, and nobody in the audience would notice any difference except that now they would have an unobstructed view of the violin section. Is this a place for a Lutheran to be? Did our Lord say "Blessed are they who stand up in front and take deep bows for they shall receive bigger fees?" No, He did not. 

The second violin section is attractive to Lutherans because these people are steady, supportive and helpful, but look who it is they help - they help out the first violins. You want to play second fiddle to that crowd? (No, I hope not.) One thing you may not know about second violins is that the parts are so easy they never practice and they wind up staying out late in singles bars on the freeway near the airport and dancing with software salesmen. But I guess that's their way.

Let's be clear about one thing about the brass section. 

The rest of the orchestra wishes the brass were playing in another room.

So does the conductor. His back is toward you so that you can't see what he's saying to them but what he's saying is, "Would you mind taking that thing outside?" The brass section is made up of men who were at one time in the construction trades. They went into music because the hours are better and there's less dust. They're heavy dudes and that's why composers wrote so few notes for them. Because after they play, you can't hear for a while.

The tuba player is normally a stocky, bearded guy whose hobby is plumbing.  The only member of the orchestra who bowls over 250 and gets his deer every year and changes his own oil. In his locker downstairs, he keeps a pair of lederhosen for free-lance jobs. Anyway, there's only one tuba in the bunch and he's it.

The trombonist is a humorist, sort of the brother-in-law of the orchestra.  He carries a water spray gun to keep his slide moist and often uses it against his neighbors. That's why they duck down back there. He's nobody you'd ever want to see become artistic director; you just hope he doesn't sit right behind you.

The trumpet is the brass instrument you imagine as Christian, thinking of Gideon and Gabriel, and then you meet one in real life, and you realize how driven these people are. They don't want to wear black tie; they want to wear capes and swords and tassels; they want to play as loud as they can and see mallards drop from the ceiling. Of the people who've keeled over dead at orchestra concerts, most of them were killed by a long trumpet passage. 

And most of them were glad to go.

There are two places in the orchestra for a Lutheran and one is the percussion section. It's the most Christian instrument there is. Percussionists are endlessly patient because they hardly ever get to play. Pages and pages of music go by when the violins are sawing away and the winds are tooting and the brass are blasting, and the percussionist sits there and counts the bars like a hunter in the blind waiting for a grouse to appear. A percussionist may have to wait for twenty minutes just to play a few beats, but those beats have to be exact, and they have to be passionate, climactic. All that the Epistles of Paul say a Christian should be - faithful, waiting, trusting, filled with fervor - are the qualities of the good percussionist.

The other Lutheran instrument, of course, is the harp.  It's a good instrument for any Christian because it keeps you humble and keeps you at home. You can't run around with a harp. Having one is like living with an elderly parent in very poor health: it's hard to get them in and out of cars, and it's hard to keep them happy. It takes fourteen hours to tune a harp, which remains in tune for about twenty minutes, or until somebody opens the door. It's an instrument for a saint. If a harpist could find a good percussionist, they wouldn't need anybody else.  They could settle down and make perfectly good music, just the two of them. 


{{{{{{{Nancy}}}}}}}} I absolutely loved this and I'm still laughing. Garrison Keillor (from the Lake Wobegone series) is absolutely incredible. Thanks for sharing.. I'll be chuckling for weeks over this one. Give IKE a big hug from all of us and tell him to get well.....

* * * * * * * * * * 

National Civil War Band Festival

  July 2000

The American Civil War Institute of Campbellsville University and the Campbellsville University School of Music announced today the launching of the "greatest and most significant gathering of Civil War bands in the nation since 1865" with the University's sponsorship of The National Civil War Band Festival, July 28-30, 2000. 

The three-day music festival will be held on the campus of Campbellsville University, which is located in south central Kentucky (82 miles southwest of Lexington; 90 miles southeast of Louisville; and 150 miles northeast of Nashville).  

Organizers of the event said that they are estimating The National Civil War Band Festival to attract between 10,000 to 25,000 people to the City of Campbellsville. 

Host bands for the festival are the Saxton's Cornet Band, based in Lexington, Kentucky, and the Old Towne Brass, based in Huntsville, Alabama. Bands wishing to participate or seeking further information may contact either Nicky Hughes at Soyuz11@aol.com or Bob Baccus at wrbaccus@hiwaay.net.

For more information concerning the festival, 

contact:

Marc C. Whitt at 270-789-5211--office or at whittm@campbellsvil.edu, 

or Dr. David McCullough, 

Director of bands at Campbellsville University, at 270-789-5058--office or at mcdavid@campbellsvil.edu.

Marc C. Whitt  

Vice President for Advancement

Campbellsville University

1 University Drive

Campbellsville, Kentucky 42718-2799

(270) 789-5211-office phone

(270) 789-5095-office fax  

"Ted"  thanks for this neat tip.  It sounds like a "once in a lifetime" event.....  If any of you Readers are interested in this, Ted has provided all the "contact" information to get "your dibs" in early.  I would suspect this will fill up in a hurry and this is a "first time" gathering of this nature....  :-)   I'm going to leave this up a bit so everyone can mark their calendars and make arrangements if they're interested.

* * * * * * * * * *

Representative Warren Akin of Georgia

Confederate Representative Warren Akin of Georgia arrived in Richmond on November 27, 1864, to take his seat in the second session of the Second Confederate Congress. Arriving three weeks late due to the birth of a daughter at home, he entertained high hopes of returning to Georgia for Christmas.

The war wasn't going well, prices in the Confederate capital were greatly inflated, and his legislator's salary might not match his expenses, he soon noted in letters to his wife, Mary. But there was the Christmas recess to anticipate. Recently introduced Senate legislation called for adjournment on December 20, a recess that was to last until January 10. That would give Akin three weeks for the difficult journey home and the return to Richmond.

True, he also wrote on December 11, "we are getting on slowly with the business of Congress." In any case, the Georgia Lawyer, farmer, and slaveholder instructed his wife that he would telegraph immediately once the Christmas recess won congressional approval. She should then send their slave Bob to meet him partway home with a wagon. "the rail roads will often fail to make connections, and I may be behind time," Akin warned. (He had ridden in a boxcar partway to Richmond the previous month.)


Three days later, on December 14, he wrote with bad news: The resolution passed by the full Senate would allow only an eight-day Christmas recess. It seemed there would not be enough time for Akin to spend any time at home.


There was one hope, however. Possibly his House chamber would amend the Senate's resolution and a longer Christmas break. "You know not how anxious I am to go home," this father of seven children wrote to his wife.


On December 16 Akin wrote that the House was still debating a bill to try to stabilize Confederate currency. "We are getting on very slowly." Then more bad news: "I am sorry I can't go home Christmas, but must bear it as well as I can. The Senate agreed to a recess of only eight days, and the House refused that, so the matter, I presume, is at rest."


Two days later, Akin mentioned that the food at this boarding house was fairly plain, far from hotel standards but ample. Akin and two Virginia state legislators were staying with the George Washington Gretter family, whose home at Fifth and Leigh Streets was a "pleasant walk" of about a quarter-mile to Capitol Square.


The war news was worse than ever as the last Christmas of the Civil War approached. Akin cited the recent November 30 debacle of John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee at Franklin, with six Confederate generals among the dead. "The loss of Generals at Franklin in Hood's army was awful... and I have no doubt when we hear the truth, our loss in officers of the line and men was awful."


The disaster at Nashville, which took place about two weeks later, would be even worse -- Hood's army was shattered. The battle began December 15, but in Richmond, three days later, Akin had heard only "a rumor ... that Hood had another fight and has been terribly beaten."


The Georgia congressman was afraid the rumor was true, and, if so, Hood's "whole army is lost, I fear." Indeed, Hood would cross into Mississippi on Christmas Day and would soon resign his command, his army no longer an effective force.


By December 21, meanwhile, Akin again was writing home, this time with Christmas only four days away. "There will be no recess at Christmas, and I do not expect to get home until Congress adjourns, and I fear that will be March or April, and may be May.
As always seems the case, the legislative pace was slow. One important issue to the Confederacy in its final months was the proposal to open the ranks to blacks, a notion dismissed early in the war. By now, however, the South was desperate, and the prospect of additional manpower was a serious matter The Second (and last) Congress would authorize President Jefferson Davis to ask the member states for three hundred thousand black soldiers, but not until mid-March 1865, too late to induct more than a few, much less deploy them.


Sitting at his desk in the House on December 22, Akin again wrote his wife: "O how glad I would be to eat dinner with you and my dear children Christmas." The next day he lamented the course of the war and the suffering throughout the Confederacy rather than dwell on the yuletide, except to write at one point: "One more day and then it will be Christmas. O how glad I would be if I could go home tomorrow."


He also reported that a turkey in Richmond by now cost $125.
Finally the House decided there would be a brief Christmas recess after all, an adjournment for two business days.


It was the day after Christmas before Akin wrote his wife again. He reported that he had spent the day with "Anderson's Brigade" (probably Georgia's General George T. Anderson). "Rode out .. [on horseback] and felt the effects of it last night." Akin, a good Methodist and occasional lay preacher, wrote that he preached a bit, and "I was very tired and did not get back until dark."


Akin did offer one observation of his Richmond surroundings: "The defenses are very strong, indeed, and I think the Yankees will be greatly slaughtered if they ever attack our men in their works."


He had been invited, he said, to two eggnog parties, "but have not gone to any." Instead, he tried to visit Vice President Alexander H. Stephens, also of Georgia. But, alas, Stephens was not home, and Akin returned to his lonely room and resumed writing a letter to his wife. He expressed regret that the House was not discharging its duties this day after Christmas, noting that members for some time had been determined "for going home and frolicking."


Akin remained in Richmond for the next several weeks, troubled not only by Confederacy's declining hope of survival but also by his family's difficulties. His wife, their seven children, and six or seven slaves had been forced from their home in Bartow County, and then from a temporary abode at Oxford, southeast of Atlanta, to escape Union forces. They were now in exile at Elberton in Akin's native Elbert County.


The legislator finally rejoined his twice-displaced family on March 5 after a "long and tedious journey through the country." Congress was still in session when he left Richmond, and no reason is given for why such a dutiful member left his post after so much sacrifice earlier. It may be that his sense of duty to family finally prevailed. It may be, too, that he saw the proverbial writing on the wall -- the surrender at Appomattox was barely a month away when Akin returned to Georgia.


Although his home and law office in Cassville had been burned by Union troops, Akin took his family back to Bartow County and picked up his legal practice after the war. He lived until a week before Christmas 1877. His widow lived until 1907. They were survived by two daughters and four sons.


The seventh child, another son, Elbert, had died in a pony-riding accident. Warren Akin learned that sad fact a few days later on his way home from Richmond in the bleak year of 1865.

And there you have it.................

* * * * * * * * * *

 

Civil War Interpretation at National Parks News

Submitted by Bulldogtjr


May 14, 2000
Civil War battlefields ordered to explain slavery as well as strategy http://www.foxsports.com/wires/pages/05/spt174805.sml


YORK, Pa. (AP) — Civil War battlefields, under orders from Congress, will update their programs in the next few years to reflect the role of slavery in the war. 


Even at Gettysburg, where programs on civilians and slaves have been added, slavery is virtually ignored in the visitors center and the emphasis remains on Rebel tactics and strategy. 


The result, said Gettysburg Superintendent John Latschar, is "a fairly distinct sense of Southern sympathy.'' 


A conference, "Rallying on the High Ground: Strengthening Interpretation of the Civil War Era,'' was sponsored by the staffs of Gettysburg and Manassas national battlefield parks last week in Washington D.C. It included Pulitzer Prize winner James McPherson and former park service chief historian Ed Linenthal to discuss the central role slavery played in the war. 


In a report to Congress in March, managers acknowledged the lack of social context at many battlefields, where few deal with slavery and the decades-old exhibits do not reflect current historical scholarship. 


But written questions from the audience during the symposium showed that some feared the social subjects would dilute military history and that Congress was mandating "political correctness.'' 


Latschar, long an advocate of including slavery in battlefield interpretation, acknowledged after the program that there was resistance to changes. He said some came from the "hard-core cannonball'' constituency, those concerned about any deviation from battlefield tactics, while others viewed it as bowing to political correctness. 


A report written by McPherson after a visit to Gettysburg two years ago by three historians was critical of the emphasis on Pickett's Charge, a Confederate attack on the third day of the battle, July 3, 1863, known as the "high-water mark of the Confederacy.'' After all, Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address, which casts the battle in an altogether different light as the beginning of "a new birth of freedom,'' adjacent to the battlefield. 


''(Visitor's center displays) offer the viewer no coherent understanding of the causes, course and consequences of the battle, much less of the war,'' McPherson wrote. "Perhaps if the 'new birth of freedom' rather than the 'high water mark' became the interpretive mantra, the perspective would be more accurate — and, incidentally, might be more relevant for the majority of battlefield visitors.'' 


Latschar said Gettysburg's 1.7 million visitors are disproportionately white and male, and emphasizing the "new birth of freedom'' would make the park more relevant not only to the descendants of slaves, but to new immigrants who came to the United States to enjoy that freedom. 

"Tom" - thanks for forwarding this neat bit of news. 

* * * * * * * * * * 

 Monument to Phoebe Bland Warner 1815 - 1905

Confederate Heroine

Submitted by Snow Beri


Phoebe Bland Warner, 1815-1905, was a True Local Confederate Heroine. A monument dedication will be held in her honor, 2pm, Sunday the 4th of June, 2000 at the Clinton Hedrick Community Building, Riverton, WV.
Phoebe traveled on foot, from the Dolly Hills, across the Dolly Path
over North Mountain, to warn the Confederate forces in Franklin that
the Union Army was on the way for a surprise attack. It was in
February, in the middle of the night, and she had to ford a swollen
Friends Run several times. For this act of heroism we honor her this
day. Please join us in celebration of our local heritage. For more
information contact 304-358-3261; pendhist@access.mountain.net.
Koren Fae Rawlings
304-358-3261
Order of the Bonnie Blue Phoebe Warner Chapter, Public Relations Officer

{{Snow Beri}} Thanks for the heads up..

* * * * * * * * * * 

Virginia In The Civil War

A few more statistics illustrate the extent of Virginia's role in the Civil War before all the shooting ended. As reported in the magazine "Great Battles", Kenneth H. Phillips, Editor, Virginia furnished the site of the first real (albeit small) battle of the war -- at Phillipi, on June 3, 1861. The Old Dominion was the location for the war's first major land battle, First Bull Run. It was the scene of the world's first engagement between ironclads at Hampton Roads. And while Petersburg may have been under siege longer than any other American city in history, is there any place other than Winchester, Virginia, that changed hands more than seventy-two times?


As Phillips in "Great Battles" noted, Virginia led the way in several other wartime departments as well. "Thirty-eight percent of all battalion-size units of the Southern army hailed from Virginia," he wrote. "More men, Northerners and Southerners alike, spilled their blood on Virginia's soil than in any other state involved. Of all the railroad lines in the South -- a major mode for moving men and supplies -- Virginia dominated, with 1,771 miles of track, 20 percent of the total in the Confederacy. Virginia also led the way in producing war products, with a resounding 32 percent of all manufactured goods used to support the war effort."


Finally, Virginians still boast that their seventy-nine generals out-numbered -- almost 2 to 1 -- the number of generals from any other Southern state."


Himself Virginia-born and raised, Phillips had another sort of story to report -- more a tale than a stark fact, but true nonetheless.


Two Virginians served in Stonewall Jackson's fabled "Stonewall Brigade." In time each was wounded in the leg, and each then lost his injured leg.


They went home, and by the turn of the century, "having become related by marriage," they were living in the same Nelson County home. For one, it was his father's home. For the other it was his father-in-law's home.
"Once a year they traveled to Lynchburg to buy supplies they were unable to raise on the farm. The two Rebel veterans would buy one pair of shoes -- one man wore the left and one man wore the right."


How would Ken Phillips know such an intimate detail? "They were my great-grandfathers."

And there you have it.................

* * * * * * * * * * 

Civil war Re-Enactors Seek Land

From: HOST GFS Gary
This article is be available on the Web for a limited time:
http://ohio.realcities.com/rc/life/docs/86061l.htm


Civil War re-enactors seek land May 19, 2000
MANASSAS, Va. (AP) -- It looks like the next Battle of Manassas might not be held anywhere near Manassas.


Civil War enthusiasts who re-enact the battles between North and South are finding a mighty foe in suburban sprawl.


Re-enactors looking for land to mark the 140th anniversary next year of the First Battle of Manassas -- the first major clash between the North and South -- have been unable to find enough space free of telephone wires and subdivisions in Prince William County, where the fighting took place. They have begun looking at other parts of the state.


"It's getting harder and harder to find a battlefield that's big enough and rural enough," said Dean Regan, whose company publishes the Civil War Times Illustrated and promotes re-enactments.


Civil War re-enactors want land that is free of cell phone towers and far from expressways and other signs of modernity.


To recreate the battle, which had 4,690 casualties, the re-enactors want a site of 1,000 acres or more. Up to 15,000 participants and tens of thousands of spectators are expected on July 21, 2001.


"They're probably going to be hard-pressed to find anything in Northern Virginia of that size and scale," said Bill Vaughan, a researcher at the county Department of Economic Development.


The 5,000-acre Manassas National Battlefield Park would be a logical choice, but national parks ban such events. The ban was issued sometime after 1961, when the National Park Service allowed a ragtag group to recreate the epic battle. The event was unsafe, officials said.


At Antietam in 1997 and Gettysburg in 1998, re-enactments were staged on farmland a few miles from the national parks where the real events took place.


About 80 percent of all Civil War battlefields remain in private hands. Re-enactors often pay $10,000 or more to rent historic lands.

 

* * * * * * * * * * 

 

Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War

7th West Virginia Infantry Camp # 7

Submitted by Snow Beri

The SONS of UNION VETERANS of the CIVIL WAR, 7th West Virginia Infantry Camp # 7, held their 2nd Annual Blue-Gray Picnic. It was held on the 13th of May, at Welton Park in Petersburg, WV. There were several members encamped there overnight, in a living history display. Richard Byrd, of Martinsburg, WV brought his cannon, other members had their civil war era firearms, and gentlemen and ladies were in period dress. The McNeill's Rangers and Brig. Gen. James Boggs' Camps of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, the Order of the Bonnie Blue Phoebe Warner Chapter, family, friends, and guests enjoyed a day of fellowship, good food, period dancing, and mock skirmishes. A Confederate service was performed by Chaplain Randy Ours for Dave and Fay Staley's reafirmation of wedding vows.


Door prizes were drawn all day, with the winners being: Jim Barker,
American flag pin; Carol Ours, camp cap; Harry [Tre] Key, 3rd, a locally dug civil war bullet; ----------, five 50/50 raffle tickets; Carolyn Sindy, Lincoln Bookends; and Mary Alice Vance, a print by Civil War artist Kunstler, titled "Until We Meet Again". The drawing for the 50/50 raffle was held, and Sherry Pennington of Franklin was
the winner. 


'Fighting from Fox and Ox Rocks in Petersburg Gap', reported by William B. Hill. "During the Civil War, General Imboden was encamped on the South Fork, and Federal forces were at Moorefield and Petersburg. Mullegan commanding at the latter place. The company of Captain Scott and part of the company of Captain Hughes were sent on the mountain east of Petersburg and south of Petersburg Gap, just above the high rocks, to hold Mullegan from re-enforcing the Union Army at Moorefield so Imboden could attack that army. Informant, one of Scott's Company, was detailed to climb a tree high above the rocks and observe the movements of Mullegan stationed on hill just west of Petersburg. While so stationed he observed the Federals forming preparatory to moving to Moorfield, and so reported to his Captain.
The advance guard of Mullegan's Cavalry passed through the Gap and when the main body was in plain view and opposite the rocks, the artillery and infantry only a little behind, fire was opened from the rocks and Mullegan's forces prevented from aiding the Union army in Moorefield." {Source: 'History of Grant and Hardy Counties, WV, by
E.L. Judy, 1951}

SUVCW, 7th WVa Infantry Camp # 7
Bill Vance, Camp Secretary
304-358-3261
pendhist@access.mountain.net

 

{{{Snow}}} Thanks for the news :D

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

A BIT OF COMMUNITY

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedback's, Items of Interest and Plea's for HELP...

From: QNavyWife

HI,
I am hoping to make it Thursday night to the chat! I was wondering if you would do a favor for me..... As you know I am the secretary for the Madison County (NY) Civil War Round Table. We now have a web page. I am just beginning to learn how to make pages so it isn't fancy but it has info at least! Could you let "the Faithful" know about it in the next Fireside? I'd appreciate it! Here's the link to it...... http://members.aol.com/_ht_a/qnavywife/myhomepage/ Also, in case he hasn't already contacted you, a man named Bruce Mowday who is the co-author of a book called "Unlikely Allies". It is about Fort Delaware, a Civil War prison community near Delaware City on Pea Patch Island in the Delaware River. For more info, please contact Bruce at mowday@worldaxes.com. He asked if I could let people know about it so I am. Some of the faithful might be very interested in the book.  
Thanks again!
Robin 

{Robin} You bet we will. 
Jim

* * * * * 

From: VFTurner2

Grace-Marie Hackwell Seminar
The San Mateo County Genealogical Society has announced that they are sponsoring a half-day seminar, featuring Grace-Marie Hackwell, noted Civil War Historian. The Seminar will be on Saturday, July 15, 2000 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at the First Presbyterian Church of San Mateo, located at the corner of Hacienda and 25th Avenue, in San Mateo. She will present two topics: (1) Locating Your Civil War Soldier, Find out if YOUR ancestor served in the Civil War, and (2) Writing Your Civil War Soldier’s Military History, Learn how to use the information in your soldier’s military service and pension records.

Grace-Marie has been a Family Historian/Genealogist for over 30 years. She currently is an Educator and Genealogical Instructor Specializing in Civil War Research (Cabrillo College, Aptos, CA.,) and Regional Director, California State Genealogical Alliance (South Central Coast). She served 7 years as Director of the Family History Center (Santa Cruz, CA) and was the Founding President of the Pajaro Valley Genealogical Society. Grace-Marie also is a Past President, Northern CA. Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society. She has written two books, A Guide to Locating Your Civil War Soldier and The Family History Time Line, authors and maintains a number of web sites about Civil War regiments, including the 4th, 51st, 66th and 142nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry and the 1st Mass. and 15th Penn. Cavalries. And if that is not enough, she arranges and escorts genealogical research tours including annual trips to Salt Lake City, Utah.

The cost of the seminar is $10 for members of SMCGS, $12 for non-members and $13 at the door. Reservations may be made by sending a check made out to: SMCGS: Hackwell Seminar, and mail it to HACKWELL SEMINAR, P.O. Box 5083, San Mateo, CA 94402-0058. 

{{{{{Vern}}}}} Thanks for passing this on to us

ED NOTE: I received the following note from Vern this week

I just wanted to thank you for including my announcement in last week's Fireside. 
{{{{{Vern}}}}} We're happy to do it!!!!! 

* * * * * 

Ker car 2
Thanks so much for a wonderfully helpful newsletter this week! I have just about finished my United Daughters of the Confederacy papers and was pleased to note how many soldiers from BOTH sides I have in my family's past! Thanks again for letting me share the news of the meetings even if I do snooze through the "real" ones! 
Linda 

{{{Linda}}}} You're entirely welcome. Thanks for the note.

* * * * * 

A good snicker from Joan......
From: JRose10700
Some friars were behind in their belfry payments, so they opened a small florist shop to raise the funds. Since everyone liked to buy flowers from the men of God, the rival florist across town thought the competition was unfair. 

He asked the good fathers to close down, but they would not. He went back and begged the friars to close. They ignored him. He asked his mother to go ask the friars to get out of business. They ignored her. So, the rival florist hired Hugh Mac Taggart, the roughest and most vicious thug in town to "persuade" them to close. Hugh beat up the friars and trashed their store, saying he'd be back if they didn't close shop.

 Terrified, the friars did so. 

The Moral of the Story: 
Hugh, and only Hugh, can prevent florist friars !!

{{Joan}} I love it. LOL

* * * * * 

From: AJWRJW
Before I begin with my inscriptions, I'd like to give you a little background on the cemetery I am involved with. Montgomery Cemetery is located in Norristown, Montgomery County, PA. It was formed in 1848 and was the first public cemetery association in Montgomery County. It was just getting into popular use when the American Civil War began sending its soldiers home for burial. We have a few notable "residents" here such as Generals Hartranft, Zook, Hancock, McClennan, Slemmer and Schall. These inscriptions, for the most part, will be from the stones of lesser known boys from Norristown and the immediate area.

Tombstones here reflect the religious aspect of the times as well as the closeness of family ties. They tell of loved ones lives as well as their deaths. Many men who fought our nation's wars are celebrated here as the following inscription demonstrates:  

No mother near him when he died 

No brother or sister's hand to cheer 
He died his country's noble pride 
Her Union Volunteer


In contrast the toll of war on the family is also told: 


He was his mother's only hope 
And all her earthly joy 
But oh the cruel unjust war 
Has robbed me of my boy


William G. Smith (of whom the preceding tells) died only days before General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, at the tender age of seventeen

Ellwood Lewis was memorialized this way: 


d. in Washington, D.C. Nov 4, 1864 aged 26yr - 9mo 
"Who will care for mother now"
Was mustered into the U.S. Service at Trenton, Co. H 8th NJ Volunteers, June 1st, 1861. Mustered out June 23rd, 1864 and was in the following battles: Bull Run, West Point, Guns Hill, Charles City Cross Road, Malvern Hill, Plains of Manassas, Crompton Pass, 
Antietam, 1st Fredericksburg, 2nd Fredericksburg, Salem Heights, Gettysburg, Fairfield, Frankstown, Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania C.H. and Cold Harbor.


Some weren't lucky enough to make the trip home from the War alive and their families documented the place of their last breath such as this inscription for George Hayberry: 


"son of George and Mary, A member of Co D 51st Regt. P.V. was wounded in the battle of Antietam and d. in Locust Spring Hospital, MD Oct 19, 1862 aged 32yr-1mo. He was engaged in the following battles: Roanoke, Natchez, Camden, Bull Run two days, Chantilly, South Mountain and Antietam."

James B Heebner,

son of Christopher & Ann, Captain, Co. A 138th Regt PA Vol. b. Dec 10, 1842 d. Feb 17, 1880 Battles of Brandy Station, Locust Grove, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Cedar Creek, Petersburg, Sailors Creek, Monocacy, Opequan, and Fisher Hill.

One notable stone in Montgomery Cemetery doesn't even mark a grave but is a memorial to a fallen brother:


Valentine Hughes Stone
Major 5th Artillery U.S. Army
b. in Bath County, KY, 
Dec 22, 1839 and d. aboard the Steamer from Fort Jefferson to Key West, Florida, Sept. 24, 1867. He was enrolled April 18 and mustered into service April 22, 1861 in the 11th Indiana Infantry Volunteers, Gen. Wallace's Regiment of Zouaves, being the first volunteers from Putnam County, Indiana to respond to the call of President Lincoln. He was appointed First Lieut. 5th U.S. Artillery May 14, 1861. Was the heroic defender of Jones Bridge across the Chickahominy in the Seven Days Battles about Richmond. In command of Battery No. 9, his artillery was the first to enter Petersburg, VA., March 25, 1865. He was promoted to be Captain and Brevetted Major same regiment, and upon the personal request of Gen. U.S. Grant for gallant and meritorious services on the battlefield. He died of yellow fever while in command of Fort Jefferson, Dry Tortugas Gulf of Mexico. This monument was erected and dedicated to his memory by his brothers, HENRY LANE STONE, who served in the Confederate Army, and R. FRENCH STONE, who served in the Union Army during the Civil War.


In memorializing their loved ones these people, who are our history, have given us the gift of knowledge and understanding of the men that lived and died for this country. These stones help to bring the history of our school books to life!

{{{{Amy}}} What a collection.... LOL When's the next set coming???????

 

* * * * * 

 

From: BLTBROWN96
It's early Monday morning 4/17 /00, but I must write this note . I , as a postal worker who works nights, very rarely get to the fireside, I do however enjoy the stories, songs, poems, etc which appear in the firesides. Thanks so very much for sending these missives to me. I do thoroughly enjoy them. Bob of BLTBROWN86 >>

"Bob", 
Thanks so much for the note. We're glad to hear you enjoy our efforts on the Weekly Fireside. It really does help us realize that we're doing a good thing and that's what makes it all worthwhile!! 
Thanks again
Jayne, Jim, Tom and Amy

From: Anakeda
Thanks for sharing JRose 10700 info on the Harold B. Simpson History Research Complex. I plan to order info on 4 of my CW ancestors. Thanks for passing on such a great lead!!
Ann 

{{{Ann}}} We're plumb tickled to death when something "connects" with one of you readers. Thanks for the Note.... Jayne, Amy, Tom and Jim

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

 

Weekly Web Sites We've Received

Submitted by the Faithful Readers of the Weekly Fireside

If you've found a favorite Civil War site, by all means, let us know!!

Send to: Host GFS Jayne :)

* * * * * 

from Moweq
The Official Federal Land Patent Records Site
http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/
BLM - ES, GLO Records - Home 

 
* * * * * 

From MDelPa
"The National Archives and Records Administration published a proposed rule beginning on page 24164 in the 25 April 2000 Federal Register to revise its fee schedule for reproduction of records in its custody. A copy of the proposed rule is posted on NARA's Web site at: 

http://www.nara.gov/nara/fees-pro.html
Proposed Rule NARA Fee Schedule-36 CFR Part 1258 

http://www.nara.gov/genealogy/civilwar.html
Civil War Records

* * * * * 

From Host GFS Gary
A, B and C names have been added to the database Black Hawk Co, IA Civil War Soldiers. Stop by and take a peek.
CENSUS ONLINE & OTHER DIGGINS:
http://www.imagin.net/~tracers/census1.htm

* * * * * 

from Bulldogtjr
Civil War Terminology Explanations
http://www.rootsweb.com/~ilcivilw/terms.htm#recruit

* * * * * 

from EJMOULTON:
For you collectors of Historical and current Music...
The Lester L. Levy Sheet Music Collection - Home page
http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/

* * * * * 

from your American Civil War History HOSTS
There have been a lot of questions recently about burials and cemeteries. You might want to check these sites out.

Burial Records
National Cemetery System
Department of Veterans Affairs
810 Vermont Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20420
Tel: 202-273-5221
http://www.va.gov/cemetery/index.htm 
Email: ncscss@mail.va.gov 

Cemetery Index - US Civil War Center
http://www.cwc.lsu.edu/cwc/projects/cemindex.htm
you can search burials at the following cemeteries
Barrancas National Cemetery (FL)
Bay Pines Cemetery (FL)
Camp Butler National Cemetery (IL)
Camp Chase National Cemetery (OH)
Chalmette National Cemetery (LA)
City Point National Cemetery (VA)
Cold Harbor National Cemetery (VA)
Cypress Hills (NY)
Danville National Cemetery (KY)
Fairhaven Memorial Park and Mortuary (CA)
Fayetteville National Cemetery (AR)
Finn's Point (NJ)
Fort Harrison National Cemetery (VA)
Fort Snelling National Cemetery (MN)
Glendale National Cemetery (VA)
Grafton National Cemetery (WV)
Lexington National Cemetery (KY)
Mill Springs National Cemetery (KY)
Mobile National Cemetery (AL)
Mount Olivet Cemetery (LA) (currently incomplete)
Philadelphia National Cemetery (PA)
Richmond National Cemetery (VA)
Santa Ana National Cemetery (CA)
Seven Pines National Cemetery (VA)
St. Augustine National Cemetery (FL)
Union Mound Cemetery (MD)

They are updating all the time so be sure to go back often.  If you click on "more cemetery sites" toward the bottom of that page, you will find many other that have lists of CW soldiers buried in those cemeteries... It's just that the sites are not searchable.

Beaufort National Cemetery Civil War Interments
http://www.angelfire.com/sc/historysc/bncc.html

Confederate POW"s Buried in Indiana
http://www.thnet.com/~liggetkw/incw/prisoners/prisoner.htm

US CWC - Civil War Links - Historic Places1
http://www.cwc.lsu.edu/cwc/links/hist.htm#Cemeteries 

National Cemeteries and Soldiers Lots
http://www.citynet.net/mostwanted/articles/natcems1.htm 
This site lists all the cemeteries in which CW soldiers are buried

Arlington National Cemetery (not burial listings) 
http://www.arlingtoncemetery.com/

Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania Court House
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~helmsnc/FredCWCEM/index.html

* * * * * 

From: frye@gnat.net

http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/Descendants.html

* * * * * 

From: Jowhara7

Thought this site was very thought provoking
http://home.flash.net/~skyangel/ourflag/ourflag.html

Submitters Note: Jacque... thought provoking is an understatement!! Thank you so much for sending this. Also, you might want to take a look at Bits of Blue and Gray column for May... at the end is "A Patriot Salutes His Flag" written by our very own HOST GFS TEG aka Tom Gladwell http://www.stategensites.com/bitsofblueandgray/may2000.asp

* * * * * 

From: NPeter2089
Identifying Military uniforms
Hi{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{ Jim.}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}} Found this on Rootsweb.Might be fun for those of us who have kin who were in wars other than the BIG ONE (CW of course). My maternal grgrandfather, on my mother's side was in the Mexican War. 

Identifying Military uniforms: 
http://carlisle-www.army.mil/usamhi/


U.S. Air Force Museum: 
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/museum/


Sources for identifying symbols on military markers:
Continental Society Sons of Indian Wars: 
http://members.tripod.com/~CSSIW


Descendants of Mexican War Veterans: 
http://www.dmwv.org/


General Society of Colonial Wars: 
http://www.ubalt.edu/gscw


General Society of the War of 1812: 
http://LanClio.org/1812.htm


National Society of the Children of the American Revolution: 
http://www.nscar.org/


National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution:
http://www.dar.org/index.html


Order of Indian Wars of the United States: 
http://members.tripod.com/~Historic_Trust/indian.htm


National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution: 
http://www.sar.org/


Spanish-American War Sources:
The Spanish American War Centennial: 
http://www.spanam.simplenet.com/


Spanish-American War Site: 
http://www.ecsis.net/~jrwilobe/


Texas Volunteers - Spanish American War Military Rolls 1898-1901:
http://www.pcworld.com/r/tw/1%2C2061%2Ctw-gen0214m%2C00.html


The 1836 Texas War of Independence:
Military Research Room: 
http://www.lineages.com/military/mil_tx.asp


The Daughters of the Republic of Texas Library @ the Alamo (research 
services):
http://www.drtl.org/


Seige and Battle of the Alamo: 
http://www.lsjunction.com/events/alamo.htm

 

Descendants of Mexican War Veterans: 
http://www.dmwv.org/


USIGS Military Collection Mexican-American War: 
http://www.pcworld.com/r/tw/1%2C2061%2Ctw-gen0214a%2C00.html


Mexican American War Memorial: 
http://sunsite.unam.mx/revistas/1847/


Lost Records of the War of 1812: 
http://pcworld.com/r/tw/1%2C2061%2Ctw-gen0214c%2C00.html


Military History: War of 1812: 
http://www.cfcsc.dnd.ca/links/milhist/1812.html


USIGS Collection of Links: 
http://www.pcworld.com/r/tw/1%2C2061%2Ctw-gen0214e%2C00.html


Where to get War of 1812 Records: 
http://www.rootsweb.com/~kyharris/1812how.htm


War of 1812 Pay Rolls and Muster Rolls (searchable collection):
http://image.vtls.com/collections/WA.html


War of 1812: Fort McHenry: 
http://www.bcpl.lib.md.us/~etowner/patriots.html


Overview of the War of 1812 from a Canadian perspective:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~canmil/1812/1812view.htm


The Patriots War of 1837-1838:
Fort Wellington, Canada: 
http://www.pcworld.com/r/tw/1%2C2061%2Ctw-gen0214u%2C00.html


The Battle of the Windmill:
http://www.pcworld.com/r/tw/1%C2061%2Ctw-gen0214n%2C00.html

{{{{Nadine}}}} Thanks cousin :D

* * * * * 

from Pinkpj622
The US Navy Memorial Foundation: Navy log
http://www.lonesailor.org/NavyLog/NavyLogMiniHub.html


GenExchange Counties
http://www.genexchange.com/counties.cfm?state=ny


Ancestral Findings - Free Lookups (birth, census, deaths, marriages, vets, etc.)
http://www.ancestralfindings.com/


Cemetery Records Online:
http://interment.net/


Cemeteries and Genealogy; Cemeteries of USA, etc.
http://interment.net/us/index.htm


The Lutheran All Faiths Cemetery
http://interment.net/data/us/ny/queens/luteran_all.htm


Military Libraries
http://www.cfcsc.dnd.ca/links/millib/index.html


Veteran/Military Web Sites United
http://members.aol.com/veterans/warlib6.html


US, Civil War Regimental Histories Index, All States
http://www.tarlton.edu/%7EkJones/unions.html


{{Pink}} Great input - Thanks

* * * * * 

from SusiCP............. 
A series of Civil War Related sites:

 

www.rootsweb.com/~ote/

 

www.janke.washcoll.edu/civilwar/states.htm

 

www.army.mil/cmh-pg/mohciv.htm

 

www.army.mil/cmh-pg/mohciv2.htm

 

www.cfcsc.dnd.ca/links/milhist/uscin.html

 

www.ristenbatt.com/geneolagy/civilwar.htm

 

www.civilwardata.com/

Thanks Susi :D

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Members Helping Members!!...

Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near vicinity, and are willing to assist can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). Do unto others as.... you know :-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can share them in the "Fireside"!! 
GFS Jim

IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO LET US KNOW!!!!! 
Thanks!! - The Editors

We have had some gracious members offer their assistance in this area. Their screen names and areas they have offered to help in are listed.... Please honor their "goodness" and don't abuse them :-).... We ask that you do follow the guidelines indicated above....

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From: LaddofOhio
Jim this lady, on another List, is requesting help with Civil War Veteran Census data. Can you be of help? If so, mail me and I will pass it on to her through the appropriate List! Thanks!


"Hello, Does anyone have access to the Special Census taken of Civil War Veterans? I am looking for any BERRYHILL vets.  My grgrGrandfather William BERRYHILL died during the war, and it is said that at least two of his brothers were also in the Civil War, but I don't know which ones; They could be: David, Matthew, James or John Thanks for any help, Kathy
[a ps:] I forgot to mention that I may not have all of the sons' names.  It is also possible that there was an Alexander and possibly others.

[Since this is from a List concerning Putnam County, Ohio, I suspect that the information would fall into Ohio Civil War Veterans.]
Donald L LADD
LDG Directory Manager
to view the Directory:
http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~ladd/id.htm

"Don" thanks for forwarding the request. See an answer to your question below.

From: TUBES14

The 1890 Civil War Veterans census records can be ordered and checked at any Family History center.
HOST GFS TEG 

Thanks {{{Tom}}}

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From: Livasy4
HI, I am hoping someone knows of a website that lists those who died at Libby Prison in Richmond. Thanks!
Donna

{{{Donna}}} Thanks for dropping a line. We have many prison websites, but I'm not sure I have Libby. We'll put this in the newsletter and see what the reader's can do to help out here....

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 The Help Desk
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Musical Suggestions from Host GFS Jim and Friends

Music To Research By

I have a bit of music to share with you this week. For those who like traditional Irish/Celtic music I listened a CD called "the Chieftains Collection" which is a compilation of the very best of their claddagh years. It is indeed one worth listening to if you are of that musical inclination.

In a previous issue I had put out a question about "Who the Rooster Was in Disney's Robin Hood". Well I got a great response (Heh Heh ) from JRose that I had to share with you. 

Roger, Roger, on the wall
Who's the greatest singer of all?
I love to roller skate in a buffalo herd, 
Just to prove I am King of the Road.

love it
joan

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Well, this week is a wee bit different than my normal ramblings. When I have the opportunity (which is not that often) to grab some very traditional music from some corner of my ancestors "globe" and listen to the style and type of music that they must have heard and enjoyed, I jump on it. So here's my find..... This CD is just an excellent example of Northumbrian Traditional Music. Northumberland is one of England's most unspoilt and scenically beautiful counties even today. It is extremely rich in both its history and its living traditions, and this is especially true with respect to its traditional music. Northumberland is the only part of England with a local music-dialect in which certain melodies are distinct from the tunes of any other region. The CD is called "Spirit of the Border" by Nimbus Records. The piping in this selection is done by master musicians and on authentic musical instruments. This won't be for all of you, but I have some ancestors from that era and I truly enjoyed listening to "Their" music just as they listened to it.
............Enjoy!

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Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Hosts/Hostesses :-) Host GFS Jim, Host GFS Jayne, Host GFS TEG and LDRS GFH Amy and our many faithful friends :)

06/01/200 - Another story in the Women's Civil War Series.... Louisa May Alcott, whom many of us have known as the author of Little Women. This story will interest you.

06/08/2000 - "Letters, Songs and Poems Night" - don't forget to send yours in. We'll be sure to read them :D

06/15/2000 - Open Chat

Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host/Hostess :-)

Host GFS Jim, Host GFS Jayne, Host GFS TEG and LDRS GFH Amy

We'll See You Thursday Night..!

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