May 1998 Weekly Firesides

Hear Ye ..............Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group
Week ending 03 May 1998

We had another great time Thursday night.  In addition to the "Faithful" we had lots of information rolling through again.

FOR ALL THE 1ST TIMER-"WELCOME" WE ENJOYED YOUR PARTICIPATION.... COME AGAIN....

This version of "The Fireside" continues a series of information about Confederate Prisons... Hope you find this useful.... This week is Camp Lawton, Georgia and Charleston, South Carolina.

Another continuing series are the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers..... So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that I thought this would also be very useful.

This upcoming Thursday will again be OPEN CHAT live from the National Genealogy Societies Convention in Denver, Colorado..  We hope to see you there.  Don't forget to check schedule area at the end of the Newsletter in the "upcoming Schedule" area.

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THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out.  Hope these answer the mail  :D

Editor's Note:  Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings:  keyword "roots", after which will bring you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum.  Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files".  At this point select "Civil War Files."  Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center: un "History Lectures" as the Lecture Subject.  Meeting Logs are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting Logs and Newsletters".

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CIVIL WAR MILITARY PRISON INFORMATION; taken from "GUIDE TO THE ARCHIVES OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICAN", compiled by Henry Putney Beers, "The National Archives".

Camp Lawton, Georgia- in Sept. 1864 a stockade was constructed near Millen, 80 miles north of Savannah, for prisoners of was from Andersonville and Savannah.  In the enclosure of 44 acres the prisoners built huts from the timber felled in clearing the camp, and an inadequate hospital was also constructed.  More that 10,000 prisoners were held at Camp Lawton in the fall of 1864, but as a result of General Sherman's operations they were removed in Nov. 1864 to Blackshear and Thomasville, Georgia.

The commandant of this prison was Capt. D.W. Vowles.  No records of this prison have been found.

Charleston, South Carolina - Prisoners of war were kept at several places in Charleston.  In 1861 prisoners taken at the first battle of Bull Run were removed from Richmond to Castle Pinckney in Charleston Harbor.  In 1862 prisoners were kept in the city jail.  U.S. naval personnel from the gunboat "Isaac Smith" were held in Charleston in 1863, and in 1864 600 officers arrived from Macon.  By Sept. 1864, 6,000 prisoners were held on the fairgound on the outskirts of the city.  The workhouse in Charleston was also used as a prison for officers..

Successive commandants of prisoners:
Col. John F. Iverson
Capt. William J. Gayer,
Lt. Col. R. Stark Means, Sept. 27, 1864

Records in Other Custody.  In Duke University Library is a guard report (1 vol.) of the military prison at Castle Pinckney, Aug. 29, 1864-Feb. 1, 1865.  It gives names of soldiers on guard during different reliefs, their companies and regiments, places where posted, and names of sergeants and corporals of the guard.  Included also is a list of names of prisoners with dates of imprisonment, charges, and sentences.

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U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers...........

The next stage of series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network.

The major types of military records kept by Federal and state governments (continued)-

Compiles Service Records - The federal government has compiled military service records for soldiers serving in volunteer units in wars between 1775 and 1902...  These records, on cards, have abstracts of information taken from unmicrofilmed original records at the National Archives such as muster rolls, pay lists, hospital records, records books, orders, and correspondence found in Record Group 94, "Records of the Adjutant General's Office, 1780s-1917. 

A card was made for each soldier and put in an envelope along with some original documents.  These files are arranged by state, then by military unit, then alphabetically by the soldier's name.  The cards usually provide a soldier's name, rank and unit, the state from which he served, the date he enlisted, and length of service.  You may also find his age, residence, physical description, and date of discharge or death.

Other Service Records - Other original records that may have been created include pay rolls, order books, hospital records, prisoner of war records, promotions, desertion records, and records of court-martial..  Many of these are found at the National Archives.

State Records of Service - Each state keeps service records for its own militia, volunteer regiments, or national guard units.  These are usually available at state archives, state historical societies, or state adjutant general's offices.  If a state unit was mustered into federal service, the federal government may have sent copies of records to the office of the state adjutant general.

The Family History Library has microfilmed state military records in many states, including Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Virginia.  Many early militia and state records have also been published and indexed.  These are described in the state research outlines. 

.................................. to be continued

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Subj:     Military on the Net
From: rosewebb@datasync,com (Rose C. Webb) 

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Here are a few military sites on the net:

http://www.schoolnet.ca/collections/courage/index.html

http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/9460/

http://www.virtual-pc.com/journal/disp_015.htm

http://www.law.on.ca/~awoolley/lwcolour.html

http://chide.museum.org.uk

http://www.du.edu/~tomills/military/america/canada.htm#canada

http://members.aol.com/VonRanke/militarybooks.html

http://www.worldwar1.com/

http://www.lib.mq.edu.au/Lachain_Marquarie_Room/regiments.html

and

http://www.de.edu/~tomillis/military/bargts.htm

{{{Rosie}}}  Perfect timing as always.  We're doing a series on Military Records and this is a perfect "Fit"!!!!!  

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Subj:  National Archives
From: NEVassau

Jim and Jayne,

These addresses I copied from a genealogy newsletter where one can order the various microfilms they would like to look at.  I thought perhaps others in our room would be interested in seeing what is available.

Eileen

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4.  Introduction to National Archives Web Site
Contributedbye Ralph Komives
RalphK@aol.com
http://members.aol.com/RalphK/DocumentSearch.html
Document Searches in Washington, D. C. Area and Annapolis, MD
Problem searches and common names a specialty.
Research at DAR Library, National Archives, Library of Congress, MD State Archives

The National Archives (NA), based in Washington, DC, is interested with the care and preservation of the records of our nation.  Really the mission is much more complex than that, suffice to say the NA has a multitude of records of interest to the genealogist and family historian.  There is now a second National Archives repository in the Washington, DC area called National Archives at College Park or just plain Archives II.  In addition, there are eleven National Archives Field Branches around the United States.  There was more than one million cubic feet of records in 1984.  This is your National Archives, your tax money at work, and it is spectacular.

Start with this web address.  It will take you to all of the National Archive web pages.

http://www.nara.gov/

From the above homepage, you will find the following pages.  Please note that these are finding aids.  They are not actual records that you can search.

http://www.nara.gov/genealogy/genindex.html
Genealogical Research at the National Archives

http://www.nara.gov/publications/microfilm/comprehensive/compcat.html 
Microfilm Resources for Research: Comprehensive

http://www.nara.gov/publications/icrofilm/Immigrant/immpass.html 
Immigrant and Passenger Arrivals on Microfilm

http://www.nara.gov/publication/microfilm/military/service.html 
Military Service Records on Microfilm

http://www.nara.gov/genealogy/natural.html 
Naturalization Records

http://www.nara.gov/publication/microfilm/census/census.html 
The Federal Population Censuses on Microfilm

http://www.nara.gov/publications/microfilm/courts/fedcourt.html 
Federal Court Records on Microfilm

The following are the most useful resource books in my library.

"Guide to Federal Record in the National Archives of the United States" 3 vols.  About $100.00.  This is now online (free) at the National Archives gopher site.  It has an index but no search engine.  You may be able to download it, although it will take a gread deal of disk space.  I have had at times, problems getting to this site.  it is there. 

gopher://gopher.nara.gov/11/inform/guide

"National Archives Microfilm Resources, A Comprehensive Catalog" Paperback about $5.00

"Guide to Genealogical Research in the National Archives"  Paperback about $25.00

There are a number of very useful catalogs all about $4.00 that cover federal population schedules, immigrant arrivals and military records (and more).  Call 1-800-234-8861 for more information and credit card orders

http://www.nara.gov/nara/bookstore/books.html 
National Archives Book Store

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6.  Genealogy Links
Compiled by Corbet Cochran, Jr.
corbet@ix.netcom.com
 

Rootsweb
http://www.rootsweb.com 

Rootsweb, Civil War
CIVIL-WAR-L-request@rootsweb.com 

Civil War **excellent**
http://geocities.com/Heartland/7612 

Funeral Homes
http://www.funeralnet.com 

Ohio Death Index
http://www.ohiohistory.org/dindex/search.cfm 

Kentucky Death Index
http://ukcc.uky.edu/~vitalrec 

Facts and links within the United Kingdom
http://www.hmc.gov.uk/archon/1/menu1.html 

Vital Records
http://www.inlink.com/~nomi/vitalrec/staterec.html 

Barbados
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/hompages/vroyal  

Texas birth records
http://www.cdc.gov/nchswww/howto/w2w/w2welcom.htm 

Handwriting Problems
http://www.firstct.com/fv/oldhand.html 

United States Internet Genealogical Society
http://www.usigs.org

Genserv 
http://GenServ.COM/

Cherished Memories by Chris Stern- genealogy
http://www.web.trek.net/stern/csindes.htl 

Tips etc. 
http://www.hsv.tis.net/~pvteye/search.html

Master Index of Army Records
http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/records.htm

Military Coding
http://www.familyville.com/warlibrary/warlib25.shtml

US Land & Property Research 
http://users.arn.net/~billco/uslpr.htm

History, Boundary changes, maps, archives, libraries, research, gazettes
http://www.irit.frSSI/~Ralph.Sobek/genealogy/FAQs/ 
http://www.mt.edu:8001/geo 
Http://mapping.usgs.giv/www/gnis/gnisform.html 
http://www.genealogy.org/%UEst-clair/counties/ 
http://www.mit.edu:8001/geo 
http://www.peabody.yale.edu/other/ghis 

Primer Course for Historic Land & Property Research ***Excellent***
http://users.arn.net/~billco/uslpr.htm 

{{{Eileen}}} Great stuff  :D  Thanks

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY......................

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, items of interest and Pleas for HELP.........

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From:  Joeycoch

What a surprise to receive the Weekly Fireside.  Since I am new to all this I seem to miss alot of what goes on in the chat room.  Also I have no idea what all the :), :-) etc. are all about.  I finally figured they stood for words or remarks but what?

Now to get back to the "Fireside" and how much I enjoyed it.  I wish I had the preceding reports about the prisons.  Is there any way to receive it (them)?

If not, keep up the good work and I'll try to be there on Thursday

Joey

"Joey" The :) and :-) are  "SMILES"  LOL  We're glad you came and I've sent you the only Fireside before this that had Prison material in it.

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From:  R4240

Thank you very much for your E-Mail concerning the Civil War chat groups.  I work evenings, so it is rare that I can join on a Thursday evening.  However, the one group that I was able to join was very interesting.  Keep up the good work, and I will hope to chat with you again.

Rosemary

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{{{Rosemary}}} Thank you very much for your feedback.  Many are in your category, and so it's great that we can help out there.....   :)

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From:  Jacque de

Hi!!!!

I really enjoyed the chat this evening, thanks.  I was wondering if you knew anybody that was any good at badges, medals or ribbons?  I have a large picture of my gggrandfather wearing a couple of things ans we cannot determine what they are.  I do have a scanner, don't know if that helps. But if you can think of anyone, could you let me know??

Thanks, Jackie

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{{{Jackie}}} We are really glad you dropped by to see us for the first time.  Now let's see what we can find out about your request.

HEY ALL YOU 670 READERS ON THE DISTRIBUTION...... "How's that for Soap Boxing it :-)"  WE NEED HELP WITH THIS ONE.  JACKIE NEEDS HELP ON CIVIL WAR BADGES, MEDALS AND RIBBONS.  SHE HAS SOME SHE'S TRYING TO IDENTIFY..  DROP HER AN EMAIL AND START SOME DIALOG WITH HER... PLEASE COPY ME SO WE CAN KEEP THE PROGRESS NOTED IN THE NEWSLETTER.  THERE MAY BE OTHERS INTERESTED AS WELL....  :)  Held over for another week.

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From:  DSHDTH

Thank you very much for the informative letter and hope to see you next time.

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You're certainly welcome and we'll be looking for you 

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From: AslanJ

In a message dated 4/25/98 10:29:05 PM Pacific Daylight Time, GFS Jim writes:  

<< Ha Ha - I remember when it took the RADIO 5 minutes to warm up!!!

Judy

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{{{Judy}}}  LOL - now we're dating ourselves.... This also means that since you're the only one that responded to this, everyone else must be 30 or younger and are probably wondering WHAT ARE WE JABBERIN ABOUT LOL >>

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And they are still scratchin' their heads.  Well, one GOOD thing about growing older is that you can get away with so much more nonsense.  Now they just think I am being eccentric!!   don'tchloveit????

Judy

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{{{Judy}}} I love this    Hahahahahahahaha  "A Senior Moment"  LOL   I doooooooloveit!!!!!

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From:  roseweb@datasync.com

Memorial Tribute

Just in time for Memorial Day!
You can now immortalize your loved ones with your own loving tribuite to them -- and know that it will be read so long as man can capture words from Cyberspace!
USIGS -- the United States Internet Genealogical Society -- is making space available in its Library for a memorial collection. To see what others have done, go to: http://www.usign.org/libreary/memorial/ 
or go to the USIGS home page (newly updated) -- http://www.usigs.org -- and trace its links, not only to the Memorial page but to other sites of interest.  The Memorial Tribute Collection came about when a member was startled to find his local newspaper would charge $1000 for a picture and a memorial obituary of his father-in-law.  He found that this charge may be high for those in smaller towns, but that newspapers generally charge from $45 to several hundred dollars for this service.

USIGS will "publish" the tribute (including a picture) for a small fee of $25.  A brief obituary may be posted for $5, and additional $10 for a picture (either black and white or color.)  A newspaper is read today and discarded tomorrow, but the MTC page is planned to last in perpetuity, just as cemetery upkeep.

Funds collected for the memorials will go into a designated fund, interest on which will be used solely for upkeep of the Memorial site.

Think what a wonderful source the MTC will be for genealogists of the future! There, under each person's name, will be bits and pieces of the fabric of their lives, as remembered by their families -- the stuff that we all would be delighted to find today about our ancestors.

This site is not just for the newly dead.  You may remember anyone in your family -- here is where to remember what great stories Grandpa used to tell, what great cherry pies Granny baked.  Her is where to point out that Dad had only and eighth grade education but he founded a business with 1082 employees, that Mom taught Sunday School for 28 years and made little ceramic figurines and dressed Barbie dolls.  Her too can be remembered the youth who pitched Little League ball and was so proud of his new car that he was paying for by flipping hamburgers at MacDonald's until.....  

Well, you get the idea.  This is not a place for family trees, although family members may be named.  This is for personal recollections about someone who was once a living, loving person, not just a name on a family chart.

It is a Memorial Tribute to your loved ones, as only you can make it.

Check out the site today and start thinking about what you want to write.  All the details and instructions are on site.

An hey, let us all know when you have your story there

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Rosie :)  Great heads up piece.....  thanks again Sis....

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From:  LauraJoH

I enjoy receiving copies of the Fireside newsletter and wonder if you would add another name to your list of recipients:  JReed44210.  Thank you, this is my cousin who is also doing gen. and is very interested in the part our ancestors played in CW history.  I appreciate it.

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Laura  :)  Got your note and cousin JReed is now a part of this "Roving Band of Minstrels"  LOL  Thanks for dropping us a line.

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From:  FI WATROUS

Jim,
Don't know if this site is posed in your information or not.
Ike

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New York State Civil War Records

This site has lots of good information regarding New York State Civil War Veterans' Records and other CW  military records and how to obtain information:  http://www.sara.nysed.gov/holding/fact/mil-fact.htm 

-------

Ike - I don't have that one.  Thanks :)  You and Nancy stay dry...  It's getting on toward tornado season back there...  

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Subj:  NY Civil War Reg.
From: FI WATROUS

Jim,
These were some Civil War queries which appeared on the Albany rootslist-- there are a couple of URLS on here that might be worth your checking out as additional resources.
Ike

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

> I have a question.  Does anyone know which regiment someone who
> lived in Albany might join during the Civil War?

It would be impossible to do more than narrow it down to about 20-30 "possibilities"-- which all could be wrong.

Check out
http://www.morrisville.edu/pages/library/local_history/sites/obtained.htmlx 
(that URL needs the .htmlx suffix-- if it is lost when the line wrapped you need to add it)

This gives "some" guidance-- but it is just a guide.  It lists 20 Regiments for Clinton Co., but I have found men serving in over 35 different Regiments from the town of Peru, Clinton Co., alone

(see my page at http://members.aol.com/jjelbrec/index.htm or how I looked in Clinton Co., & a summary of the series A0389)

Your best bets are:
1. 1865 Census, if the uncle survived the war & you know where he was in 1865.
2. 1890 Veteran's Census, if he was still alive.
3. try SARA- if you have name & birth year, it's worth a try;
http://www.sara.nysed.gov/holding/fact/mil-fact.htm 

> some trouble in trying to figure out which regiment he might have gone
> with. He was a boatman, which means he traveled frequently up and down
> the Hudson River from West Troy.

Which also introduces the possibility that he joined the Navy. (or served on a ship as a landsman-- and never joined a Regiment

> The trouble I have is this: He may have joined up in Albany or he may
> have joined up in New York City. Can someone help me?

The men in Clinton Co. enlisted all over NY, and in VT, PA, WI, NH... you get the idea.

Good luck,
Jim
--
"Ike" Thanks - this is great. FOR YOU READERS, this question was being discussed in a SIG session a couple of weeks ago.  Ike found this info and we're sharing with everyone.

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From: Bulldogtjr

If lawyers are disbarred
and clergymen defrocked,

doesn't it follow that......

electricians could be delighted,
musicians denoted,
cowboys deranged,
models deposed,
and dry cleaners depressed?

Wouldn't you expect laundry workers to decrease,
eventually becoming depressed and depleted?

Likewise, bedmakers might be debunked,
baseball players debased,
bulldoze operators degraded,
organ donors delivered,
software engineers detested, and
underwear manufacturers debriefed.

And won't all composers one day decompose?

On a more positive note, perhaps we can hope politicians will someday be devoted.
"Ted"'' This is great. "FROM TED'S COMEDY CORNER" Heh Heh

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT........

OUR FOCUS:  The "History of the North American Civil War."

OUR GOAL:  To enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "fun" by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

OUR PROMISE:  to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, people and social happenings.  In addition we dedicate on Thursday a month to sharing Song, Poems and Letters from that era.  So come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm....  For a full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and w find new visitors who show an interest in this topic and our Thursday sessions, we automatically add your to our Weekly Notices.

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"....  :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation.  We relish what members bring to the discussions, and we hope to see more of you...   Note that for any reason, you desire to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste-haste."

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events*****

Time:  Every Thursday Night at 11 pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with HOST GFS Jim and our many fill-in friends :)

5/7/98 - OPEN CHAT "Broadcasting live" (I got the laptop) from the NGS in Denver :)

5/14/98 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night.  Don't forget to send any material you want presented by myself GFS Jim, or GFH Jayne.

5/21/98 - OPEN CHAT

5/28/98 - "The Battle of Franklin"

We'll See you Thursday.....
Your Hosts
GFH Jayne and GFS Jim

Hear Ye ..............Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group
Week ending 10 May 1998

We had a great "Live Broadcast" from the NGS Convention in Denver, Colorado Thursday night. In addition to the "Faithful" we lots of information rolling through again. I also have a really GREAT Announcement to make..... GFS Karen and GFS BB are going to leave the Native American SIG for one night and come visit us to give a Guest Fireside on the "Redstick War". The role of the Native Americans in the Civil War. We're shooting for the END OF JUNE, so PASS THE WORD.... This is a rarely covered topic but so pertinent to the history we focus on in this SIG.....

TED - I found it. I've been looking for the "Portals of Hell" and Ted told me where to find it. For those of you interested in a great Bookstore online that carries a really good selection of Civil War Material, check http://amazon.com

FOR ALL THE 1ST TIMERS - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED YOUR PARTICIPATION..... COME AGAIN....

This version of "The Fireside" continues a series of information about Confederate Prisons.. Hope you find this useful...... This week is Columbia, South Carolina and Danville, Virginia.....

Another continuing series are the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers........ So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that I thought this would also be very useful....

This upcoming Thursday will be our monthly gathering to read Letters, Poems and Songs of the Civil War....... You won't want to miss this one :). Don't forget to check schedule are at the end of the Newsletter in the "Upcoming Schedule" area.
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THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. Meeting Logs are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters".
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CIVIL WAR MILITARY PRISON INFORMATION;
taken from "GUIDE TO THE ARCHIVES OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA"; compiled by Henry Putney Beers; "The National Archives".

Columbia, South Carolina - Prisoners of war were held at several places in and near Columbia. Late in 1861 they were kept in the city jail and at a fairground. On Jan. 28, 1862, the Secretary of War ordered Col. John S. Preston, commandant of the camp of instruction at Columbia, to assume command of the prisoners and the special gurad. That summer prisoners sent from Charleston were turned over to his command. Capt. R.D. Senn, commander of the post guard at Columbia, was in charge of prisoners of war in the "Jailhouse Prison" there in 1864. In Oct. 1864 officer prisoners were transferred from Charleston to a field near Columbia where a makeshift prison was constructed. It became known as Camp Sorghum, from a principal item in the prison diet; sorghum molasses. So many escapes from Camp Sorghum occurred that a new prison fro officers was established on the grounds of an asylum for the insane. In Feb. 1865 there were 1,200 prisoners at the new prison, known as Camp Asylum to Charlotte, and soon afterward 1,003 officers were removed to Goldsboro and paroled.

Sucessive commandants of Camps Sorghum and Asylum:
Lt. Col. R. Stark Means, Oct. 1864.
Maj. Elias Griswold, Dec. 1864.

Record Group 109. -- An account of a sutler at the Columbia military prison, Nov. 1, 1864 - Feb 19, 1865 (ch. IX, vol. 243), contains a chronological record of receipts for provisions, postage stamps, supplies, shoes, and tableware sold to prisoners.

Danville, Virginia -- On Nov. 11, 1863, 4,000 prisoners of war were transferred from Richmond to Danville where they were quartered in six tobacco factories. Other prisoners came from Richmond in 1864. During Feb. and Mar. 1865, most of the prisoners were removed for exchange, and when the U.S. forces occupied Danville in April only 763 prisoners remained.

Successive commandants of this prison:
Capt. Henry McCoy, Nov. 1863
Maj. Mason Morfit, Dec. 1863.
Lt. Col. Robert C. Smith, Oct. 25, 1864.

James I. Robertson, Jr., "Houses of Horror; Danville's Civil War Prisons, " Virginia Magazine of History and Biography,

Record Group 249. -- A register of patients in the military prison hospital, Nov. 1863 - Mar. 27, 1865 (misc. records, vol. 18); and a register of deaths in the hospital, Nov. 1863 - Apr. 1865 (misc. records, vol. 12, p. 272-357.
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U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers.............................

The next stage of series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

The major types of military records kept by federal and state governments (continued) --

Pension Records.
The federal government and some state governments tranted pensions or bounty land to officers, disabled veterans, and veterans who served a certain length of time. Pension records usually contain more genealogical information than service records. However, not every veteran received or applied for bounty land or a pension. Veterans who did not qualify under the pension laws may have received benefits by special acts of Congress. The appropriate federal or state agency maintained a pension file for each applicant. these files contain the application papers and any further correspondence or documents.

In a person's pension application papers you may find his name (and sometimes his wife's maiden name); rank; military unit; period of service; residence; age; date and place of birth, marriage, and death; and the nature of his disability or proof of need. To prove that he served in the military, he may have included documents such as discharge papers or affidavits from those with whom he served. Widows or heirs had to prove their relationship to the verteran with marriage records and other documents, and the file may list the names of dependent children under the age of 16.

Pension files for 1775 to 1916 are available at the National Archives in Record Group 15, Records of the Veterans Administration. Only those for the Revolutionary War have been microfilmed.

Lists of federal and state military pensioners have been published for the years 1792 to 1795, 1813, 1817, 1818, 1820, 1823, 1828, 1831, 1835, 1840, 1849, 1857, 1883 and 1899. Most of these lists are found in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set, available at federal repository libraries and major university libraries. Some have been reprinted. The lists provide the soldier's name and his heirs, age, death date, and service information.

Bounty Land Records.
As these were provided by the federal government for those who served in the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Mexican War, and Indian wars between 1790 and 1855, and NOT those that served in the Civil War, we won't delve into this area.

Draft or Conscription Records.
Since 1863, the federal government has registered millions of men who may have been eligible for military service. The Civil War enrollment records and World War I draft registration cards typically give the man's name, residence, age, occupation, marital status, birthplace, physical description, and other information. These will be addressed in more detail later.

Unit Histories.
Histories of military units may contain biographies of officers, rosters of members, and clues to where the soldiers were living when they enlisted. There is no standard way that unit histories are catalogued in the Family History Library Catalog. It is best to search the Author/Title section of the microfiche catalog under the name of the author.

Civil War unit histories are described in detail later in this series.

.........................to be continued...
************************************************************************************
From: FI WATROUS

RESEARCH HELP / LAND GRANTS

For all of us trying to follow our ancestors' migrations ---------

The Bureau of Land Management has put up a free web site where you can
search for land patents filed by your ancestors in the 31 states
bordering or east of the Mississippi. Only 11 states are online so
far but it's still a great site. You can even view the actual land
documents.

The URL is: http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/

Ike Watrous
FI WATROUS

{{Ike and Nancy}} Thank You :D As always you are the "Bringer of Neat Things"....
************************************************************************************
Subj: [Civil War in AR - New page]
From: rosewebb@datasync.com (Rose C. Webb)

Afternoon Folks!

It is with great pleasure that Edward G. Gerdes and myself announce a
new page on the Edward G. Gerdes Civil War Page in Arkansas!

AR Civil War Pg: http://www.insolwwb.net/~egerdes/

It is : "THE RICHLAND RANGERS: COMPANY D CSA"


This was one of those pages that was fun to find... our thanks first,
goes to Wanda Ridge, who made us aware that this existed, to Lela Knight
Ashburn, President of the Woodruff Co. Historical Society who graciously
gave us permission to use the article from their Historical Society
Journal and to James Logan Morgan who researched the original
information and who made this page possible.

I just wish we could find more like this... :-D If any of you Arkansas
Counties and/or Historical Societies have other Civil War Units you have
publ. and would like to see up on the Civil War page, just let us know!

Have Fun!

Jeri and EG
--
"but I remain your affectinate cosin untill death."
Thank you again ggrandpa Davis for those words.
Never dreamed I'd get to use em!
----------------------------------------------------
AR Civil War Pg: http://www.insolwwb.net/~egerdes/
Memorial Pg: http://members.tripod.com/~egerdes/index.html
Lawrence Co. AR:http://204.94.194.22/lawrence/
Personal Pg: http://idt.net/~jfultz19
Izard Co. AR: http://idt.net/~jfultz19/izardco1.htm
Original AR Gen PG: http://www.CouchGenWeb.com/arkansas/

-----------------------------------------------
To contact the list owner, use stephenL@indiana.edu

For information on available lists, other list options, and other
generally useful information, visit
http://php.indiana.edu/~stephenl/genealog.htm


{{{Rosie}}} You are your ever faithful self, SIS.....
************************************************************************************
From: rosewebb@datasync.com (Rose C. Webb)

Subject: Clarification of info on Land Entry files
Date: Sat, 2 May 1998 11:23:31 -0400
From: Linda Haas Davenport <lhaasdav@AVANA.NET>
To: ARKANSAS-ROOTS-L@LISTSERV.INDIANA.EDU

>From the number of messages I have received in the last couple of hours I
need to clarify my post about the Warrant/Patents on-line.

1st: You can read a full detailed explanation of how land records work
on
my home page. http://www.avana.net/~lhaasdav/Haas.html

2nd: The Eastern States BLM Office holds the records of warrants &
patents
for the following public domain states: AL, AR, FL, IL, IN, OH, LA, MI,
MN, MO, MS, OH and WS. All of these states are not necessarily eastern
states, but the records are located in the Eastern DIVISION OF THE BLM

3rd: There are three steps to land entry case file info.

Go first the BLM CD site and search their index:
http://www-a.blm.gov/eso/pages/glo.html Find your ancestor and WRITE
DOWN THE PATENT / WARRANT number

Go to the new Patent/Warrant site http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/ sign up
and then sign in. Enter your warrant / patent number and you will get the
information on the patent/warrant which can then be download and you can
actually see the patent. If it's a CASH PURCHASE then you are at the end
of your search. If it's any other type you're in luck

Armed with the copy of the patent/warrant you can write to the National
Archives and request a copy of the land entry case file. (look at my Land
Records essay to see what all comes in those files).

Hope this clarifies my original post. My terminology was incorrect I
should have said "Patent/Warrant" records rather than case file. But this
is one of the greatest things that could go on line. You used to have wait
weeks to get a copy of a patent/warrant.

And, if anyone is subscribed to lists for the above states will you post
the information on the new site. I'm not subscribed to most of them.

If you have any questions please e-mail me.

Thanks and happy hunting

Linda
lhaasdav@avana.net

Home Page: http://www.avana.net/~lhaasdav/Haas.html

Another Entry from Linda:
-----------------------------------------------
To contact the list owner, use stephenL@indiana.edu

Remember, to leave ARKANSAS-ROOTS-L, send
SIGNOFF ARKANSAS-ROOTS-L
to
LISTSERV@LISTSERV.INDIANA.EDU

DON'T send it to ARKANSAS-ROOTS-L-request ... that won't work!

This would be of special interest to those of you working on Land Reords. Thanks Rosie :D
************************************************************************************
There have been many folks asking what the James River Web Site Address was... Well I finally found it again.

http://www.erols.com/jreb/civilwar.htm
James River Publications Civil War Home Page

GFS Jim
************************************************************************************

A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of Interest and Pleas for HELP................

************************************************************************************
Subj: Shiloh Nat'l Battleground & Cemetery
From: GFH Jayne

Hi all, 
Thought you might enjoy reading this.. I "go to" the Cemeteries and Headstones" message board every so often and last night I saw this...
As ever,
Jayne 

* * * * * 

From: CastIeLady NOTE: I tried emailing her, and it said she was not a known member of AOL....

I wanted to share this story with y'all....I'm not very good at expressing myself but I will try to convey the feelings we had when we visited this cemetery.

In November 1995, my husband and I took a just-the-two-of-us vacation to northeast Mississippi. We "headquartered" in Corinth, MS and explored all around there. There is a Civil War cemetery and small battleground memorial park in Corinth. But our most memorable excursion was to Shiloh, about an hour from Corinth. We woke up that morning to extreme (for us!) cold and snow lightly falling. (Having lived all my life in either New Orleans or Houston, that in itself was a thrill for me!) By the time we left the motel, the snow had covered everything pretty well. Just about the time we reached Shiloh, we heard the news that the government had shut down due to not having an approved budget and that all government offices....including the national park system would be closed! We decided to chance it anyway. There were no gates at the park entrance so we drove in. Having gotten there very early, we were the only people there! Shiloh is set up so that one can take a self guided tour...stops are set up numerically so that one can progress as the battle did. We started at the national cemetery and noticed that most of the graves were Union soldiers. It is fairly large and located on the banks of the river under massive spreading trees. In the total quiet, the only sound was the crackle of the snow and ice under our feet.
We then continued on the tour. After several stops we finally came upon one that was a mass grave of Confederate soldiers! The grave was about 10 feet wide and about 70 feet long and held approximately 700 soldiers stacked 10 deep! (I think I've got the dimensions correct but I know the count is correct) The grave was set far back in the trees and edged with spent cannonballs. It was not the only one we found that day; there were at least two other slightly smaller sites. Standing there under the trees surrounded by no one, the stillness and silence was deafening; the sadness and hopelessness of what had transpired there was awesome. 

Shiloh is a monument to a Union victory, with large and small monuments to all battlions and contingents that fought there placed all around the park. Viewed especially in the cold and the snow and the stillness, it was hard to hold back tears. One could feel the presence of those that fought and died there. It is an experience that will stay with me forever.
---<--{@ Catherine @}-->---
*~*~*~*~*~*
>>

{{{Jayne}}} Wish we could find "CastleLady" and thank her.... I'm "bawlin", because I felt the same way on a winter visit.
************************************************************************************
From: WolfordGen

Hi Jim - Thanks for the newsletter. I will try and join you all tomorrow night. I am taking a mental health day.

In regard to your note about national guard records in the state's possession. If someone is looking for these types of records, but needs an address, they can call their local VA office. They have the addresses and phone numbers of the adjutant generals office for all the states. If the person answering the phone doesn't have the info, each station has a Military Records Specialist who certainly will have that info. (I am MRS for VA in White River Jct VT.) VA has a toll free line 1-800-827-1000. That number will get the Regional Office for the area the person is calling from.

Jim in Vermont

Great Information Jim :) Thank You
*************************************************************************************
From: Jacque de

Hi! 

I really enjoyed the chat this evening, thanks. I was wondering if you knew anybody that was any good at badges, medals or ribbons? I have a large picture of my gggrandfather wearing a couple of things and we cannot determine what they are. I do have a scanner, don't know if that helps. But if you can think of anyone, could you let me know??

Thanks
Jackie

{{Jackie}} We are really glad you dropped by to see us for the first time. Now let's see what we can find out about your request.

From: Jacque de

Yeah!!! Thanks for printing my request in your fireside chat about the badge identification. I got a response! I believe the medal has been Identified!

A wonderful gentleman came along and took a look at the picture and this is his response, based on the information I gave him:

Based on the information from you that Private Roach was confederate, 
I am positive that the lapel medal is that of a member of the United Confederate Veterans.

Sorry I wasn't at the chat last week things are a little hectic sometimes when you have a 5 month old and your Doctor - husband works weird hours. I probably won't be there again this Thursday, because my mother is coming to visit and this is her first visit in 2 years and she hasn't seen her new grandbaby yet. So needless to say, I may be busy. I will be back though, and thanks again!

Jackie

{{{{Jackie}}}} GREAT. Take a look at Bertie's request below.. If your "Wonderful Gentleman" wouldn't object, possibly he could help Bertie out as well. :)
*************************************************************************************
From: Bhhoch55

I have a picture of one of my Civil War ancestors with his war medals on his pocket. I also would like to find out what they stand for. This is not James DeClark, but the one who served using 4 names. 

Bertie Hoch

{{{Bertie}} I passed our request to Jackie (above)
*************************************************************************************

From: Avon938

Hello, Jim :D You did a terrific job on the "Weekly Fireside" (as usual)...............much good information and imaginative talks..........thank you so much. BTW, I received 2 emails on it......are they the same? Thanks again and have a great day! 

Anna Vaughn

{{Anna}} Thanks for the nice feedback. Everyone seemed to have received two last week. "Go Figure It" LOL I only sent one, I PROMISE. LOL
*************************************************************************************
From: CivilWar49

Jim, Is there such a group, and if so, how might I join?

Thanks,
Mark

Mark - this newsletter (The Fireside) should contain all the information you're looking for :)
*************************************************************************************
IT'S A BOY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
From: Pollyann9

Pollyann9 and Bigdad009 are the proud grandparents of Nathaniel Cole Masters born 12:55 a.m. May 7,1998. He weighs 6lbs. and 9 ozs. and is 20 inches long. He isn't red at all and sleeps like a log, takes after his daddy already, and mother and baby are doing great. He has blond eyebrows and blond eyelashes. Cindy, His other grandmama, said he looks just like Tonya did when she was born.

Just wanted to share our good news. Paul ships out May 17 for Alaska and when the baby has a few months on him,mom and baby will follow.

We were going through my aunt's things and cleaning house,literally !! :) She is 98 and has finally moved in with my sister. For 48 years she through NOTHING away so you can imagine the jewels I am finding !! We were throwing away some newspapers and one had a headline or " Eisenhower throws his hat in the ring". To get an idea of the young people I am working with,one turned to the other and said," Just how did that turn out ?" :0

On the back of an invoice dated April 26,1902 there is a note from to my aunt Pattie Pearl from her grandfather. I reads as follows:

Miss Pattie Pearl
Grand Pas little girl, you must be a smart little girl I want to see you, I havn't been well in some time hope to be better soon I am going to come ?? soon as I can. You must all come down soon as you can I send you some banannas hope they will please you children hope you will enjoy them. May the Good Lord bless and save you everyone Father Mother and all is my daily prayer

Grand Pa

Copied this as exaxtly as I could just couldn't help but share :)

Julia

{{{{Julia & BigDad}}}} CONGRATULATIONS to the New Grandparents...... :) LOL
*************************************************************************************
Subj: Women in civil war 
From: GENESGENE

From Women in the civil war.

Janie Smith, Letter to Janie Robeson, Mrs. Thomas Webb Collection, North 
Carolina Division of Archives and History, Raleigh, N.C.
Am not sure of just how Janie fits into my particular Robeson family, but that she is one is no doubt. Must look through the published family history and find her.

Mrs. Thomas Womack, Letter to Zebulon Vance, Zebulon Vance Papers, North 
Carolina Division of Archives and History, Raleigh, N.C.
Isn't this interesting ? Here is Mrs Thomas Womack who also fits into my family. 
My Thomas Womack(direct) (of Rowan County NC) was deceased by this time, but you can be almost sure Mrs Womack would be a descendant. Probably a grandchild A new genealogy trail to follow. 

Thanks GFS Jim and Sister Rosie

Heh Heh "Bingo"..... Civil War Records do it again :D
*************************************************************************************
From: JFinn47
Jim, thanks for sending the Chat it was so informative with all the web sites, etc. I appreciate it. You are all doing a good job and I for one, am grateful. Joan

{{Joan}} Bless your heart!! Your response makes us work all the harder.....
*************************************************************************************
From: JLuna93420
It seems that I can't get in on the chats, maybe later on. My mother is ill and
really am busy.
Thanks,
joyce

{{Joyce}} That's why we have "The Fireside". Hope your Mom gets better....
*************************************************************************************
From: Grimuspf42

Hi Jim: Just a note to thank you again for sending all this info about Civil War to me. 
Will send copy to my father who is very interested in this kind of stuff.

You have a good day.

Later, BAG

BAG - GREAT!!!! If your father has an email address (AOL or not), pass it on to me and I'll send this direct to him ...... :)
*************************************************************************************
From: JP4648

Don't know why but I am receiving 2 Weekly Freesides. I can't remember doing it but I must have signed up twice. Please remove me one time from your files but be sure I get my 1 copy. I am really enjoying all of your information. Thanks for all you do.

JP - Heh Heh , You're not on my list twice.... LOL There was a fluke in the mail distribution last week. EVERYBODY got two copies..... and thanks for the good words.
*************************************************************************************

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT………….

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War".

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "fun" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of.

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, people and social happenings. In addition we dedicate one 
Thursday a month to sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save 
you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look 
on 
the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest in this topic and our Thursday 
sessions, we automatically add you to our Weekly Notices.

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we 
hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, you desire to be removed from distribution of this 
"Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste-haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events******

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Host GFS Jim and our many fill-in friends :)


5/14/98 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send any material you want presented to myself GFS Jim, or GFH Jayne.

5/21/98 - OPEN CHAT

5/28/98 - "The Battle of Franklin"

"Tenative" 6/25/98 - "The Redstick War" A Guest Fireside by GFS Karen and GFS BB.

We'll See You Thursday……….
Your Hosts
GFH Jayne and GFS Jim

Hear Ye ..............Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group
Week ending 17 May 1998

Just a GREAT Evening with everyone for "Letters, Poems and Songs" night.... Whew!!!! Some of those letters and poems are real "jerkers".... Y'all keep those cards and letters rolling in..... LOL Check down in "A Bit of Community" as by popular demand I have posted to items from Thursday night.

We would also like to Bid a VERY FOND FAIRWELL to your Newfound Friend "Joeycoach", for the time being. She's headed back north for the summer and will be out of touch for a bit, BUT she'll be getting the "Fireside" so this is for her.......

I'm going to keep this ANNOUNCEMENT up so you will all be able to plan for it when we get it actually nailed on the schedule.. GFS Karen and GFS BB are going to leave the Native American SIG for one night and come visit us to give a Guest Fireside on the "Redstick War". The role of the Native Americans in the Civil War. We're shooting for the END OF JUNE, so PASS THE WORD.... This is a rarely covered topic but so pertinent to the history we focus on in this SIG..... Tenatively we have set the date for 25 June 198.

FOR ALL THE 1ST TIMERS - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED YOUR PARTICIPATION..... COME AGAIN....

This version of "The Fireside" continues a series of information about Confederate Prisons.. Hope you find this useful...... This week is Florence, South Carolina and Lynchburg, Virginia, and Macon, Georgia.....

Another continuing series are the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers........ So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that I thought this would also be very useful....

This upcoming Thursday will be our monthly gathering to read Letters, Poems and Songs of the Civil War....... You won't want to miss this one :). Don't forget to check schedule are at the end of the Newsletter in the "Upcoming Schedule" area.
*************************************************************************************

THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. Meeting Logs are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters".
*************************************************************************************
CIVIL WAR MILITARY PRISON INFORMATION;
taken from "GUIDE TO THE ARCHIVES OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA"; compiled by Henry Putney Beers; "The National Archives".

Florence, South Carolina -- In Sept. - Oct. 1864 Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones, commander at Charleston, transferred prisoners of war from Charleston to Florence. A stockade was built around 23 acres, and by Oct 12, 1864, there were 12,362 prisoners at Florence. Able-bodied prisoners were escorted away for exchange in Feb. 1865, and early in March the prison was abandoned.
Successive commandants of this prison:
Maj. F. F. Warley, Sept. 1864.
Lt. Col. John F. Iverson, Dec. 6, 1864.
Record Group 249. -- A register of prisoners, Sept.-Dec. 1864 (misc. records, vol. 12, pp. 430-547), giving from names from S to W only the date of arrival, names, rank, company, regiment, place captured, branch of service, date and place of birth, and disposition.
Records in Other Custody. -- The South Carolina Archives Department has a few records of the Florence prison, Nov. 1864-Jan. 1865, including correspondence, a court-martial proceeding, and a morning report.

Lynchburg, Virginia -- Prisoners captured by Gen. Thomas J. Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley were placed in stables at a fairground in Lynchburg. A tobacco warehouse and a hospital held 2,248 prisoners in July 1862. These were exchanged, but in 1864 others were held at Lynchburg.
Successive commandants of this prison:
Major Moffett.
Col. George C. Gibbs.
No records of this prison have been found.

Macon, Georgia -- Some officer prisoners were held at Macon by the post commandant, and when others arrived from Richmond in May 1864 they were placed in a 3-acre enclosure, which became known as Camp Oglethorpe, on a fairground just east of Macon. Late in July 1864 some of the prisoners were removed to Charleston and the others to Savannah.
Successive commandants of this prison:
Capt. W.K. Tabb.
Capt. George C. Gibbs, May 25, 1864.
No records of this prison have been found.

*************************************************************************************
U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers.............................

The next stage of series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

The major types of military records kept by federal and state governments (continued) --

************************************************************************

Census Records

The federal censuses of 1840, 1890 and 1910 specifically list veterans and pensioners. Some state censuses also have information about soldiers and veterans. The federal censuses of 1900, 1910, and 1920 include special enumerations of personnel serving at military and naval installations, ships and hospitals at home overseas.

Cemetery Records

Soldiers and veterans were often buried in private, public, church, national, and military post cemeteries. Others were buried on the battlefield or in prison or hospital cemeteries. The first national military cemeteries were created in 1862 during the Civil War.

The National Cemetery System has a card index that identifies nearly all soldiers who were buried in national cemeteries and other cemeteries under federal jurisdiction from 1861 to the present. The address is....
National Cemetery System
Department of Veteran Affairs
810 Vermont Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20422

The Family History Library has microfilms of burials in some national cemeteries, such as the following:

Louisana United States National Cemeteries (FHL 13 films; FHLC computer number 568030).

To find microfilm numbers of cemetery records with the Family History Library Catalog on microfiche, search the Locality section under [STATE] - CEMETERIES and [STATE], [COUNTY], [CITY] - CEMETERIES.

The following book is the best listing of national cemeteries, state veterans' cemeteries, soldiers' lots, and abandoned military cemeteries.

Holt, Dean W. "American Military Cemeteries: A Comprehensive Illustrated Guide to the Hallowed Grounds of the United States, Including Cemeteries Overseas. Jefferson, N.C.; McFarland & Co., Inc., 1992. (FHL book 973 V3ho)

Some states and counties have grave registration offices that identify and mark the graves of soldiers buried in local cemeteries. You can usually find these by contacting the state archives or state library. The Family History Library has some of these records for states such as Maine, Ohio, South Dakota and Utah.

.........................to be continued...
************************************************************************************
Rosie is continually monitoring the Arkansas Roots Web Page and has passed this on about information on the Sultana Disaster. For those of you who are interested or researching this area.

To: ARKANSAS-ROOTS-L@LISTSERV.INDIANA.EDU

I forgot to mention that the articles about the Sultana are on the
Warstory and Letters page!!

http://www.insolwwb.net/~egerdes/warstory.htm

Jeri
--
"but I remain your affectinate cosin untill death."
Thank you again ggrandpa Davis for those words.
Never dreamed I'd get to use em!
----------------------------------------------------
AR Civil War Pg: http://www.insolwwb.net/~egerdes/
Memorial Pg: http://members.tripod.com/~egerdes/index.html
Lawrence Co. AR:http://204.94.194.22/lawrence/
Personal Pg: http://idt.net/~jfultz19
Izard Co. AR: http://idt.net/~jfultz19/izardco1.htm
Original AR Gen PG: http://www.CouchGenWeb.com/arkansas/
Helms Research PG: http://members.tripod.com/~irahelms/index.html

Thanks Sis :)
************************************************************************************
From: PAPFP

Jim.... I would like to make a suggestion for those readers looking for information on the history of their ancestors Confederate medals, badges or ribbons.

They should contact Peter Bertram, the editor of the Confederate MBR (medals, badges, ribbons) Newsletter. Not only is he knowledgeable about such items, he is currently writing a book giving description, history and the presentation of such awards. His ultimate goal is to catalog as many as possible, thus preserving the history for future generations. 

Peter can be reached at XXXXXXXXXXXXXX. [NOTE: I have omitted Peter's screen name until I have his permission to put it in a newsletter with this much wide distribution. If you have a need, send me an email and I'll be your go between until Peter gets in touch with me :) - Thanks GFS Jim]

Enjoy reading the Weekly Fireside....keep up the good work
Donna

{{{Donna}}} THANKS for this neat information..... 

************************************************************************************

A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of Interest and Pleas for HELP................

************************************************************************************
The earth was created by the assitance of the sun, and it should be left as it was ......
The country was made without lines of demarcation, and it is no man's business to divide it.....
I see the whites all over the country gaining wealth, and see their desire to give us lands which are worthless...
The earth and myself are of one mind. The measure of the land and the measure of our bodies
are the same.
Say to us if you can sy it, that you were sent by the Creative Power to talk to us.
Perhaps you think the Creator sent you here to dispose of us as you see fit.
If I thought you were sent by the Creator I might be induced to think you had a right to dispose of me.
Do not misunderstand me, but understand me fully with reference to my affection for the land. I never 
said the land was mine to do with it as I chose.
The one who has the right to dispose of it is the one who created it.
I claim a right to live on my land, and accord you the privilege to live on yours.
:
Heinmot Tooyalaket
(Chief Joseph) of the Nez Perces
************************************************************************************
A Poem sent us from Rosie (Acadian99) -- "I have a poem. It was the only poem ever written by Johnny Cash. I think when you hear it you will get a better understanding of what I mean about our flag and why it means so much to a veteran whether he or she was a veteran of a war or not." 

Chuck "DOC" Stewart 

Ragged Old Flag by Johnny Cash 
:
I walked through a county courthouse square, 
On a park bench an old man was sitting there. 
I said, "Your old courthouse is kinda run down." 
He said, "Naw, it'll do for our little town." 
I said, "Your flagpole has leaned a little bit, 
And that's a Ragged Old Flag you got hanging on it. 
He said, "Have a seat", and I sat down. 
"Is this the first time you've been to our little town?" 
I said, "I think it is." He said, "I don't like to brag, 
But we're kinda proud of that Ragged Old Flag." 
"You see, we got a little hole in that flag there 
When Washington took it across the Delaware. 
And it got powder-burned the night Francis Scott Key 
Sat watching it writing _Oh Say Can You See_. 
And it got a bad rip in New Orleans 
With Packingham and Jackson tuggin' at its seams." 
"And it almost fell at the Alamo "
Beside the Texas flag, but she waved on through. 
She got cut with a sword at Chancellorsville 
And she got cut again at Shiloh Hill. 
There was Robert E. Lee, Beauregard, and Bragg, 
And the south wind blew hard on that Ragged Old Flag." 
:
"On Flanders Field in World War I She got a big hole from a Bertha gun. 
She turned blood red in World War II 
She hung limp and low by the time it was through. 
She was in Korea and Vietnam. 
She went where she was sent by her Uncle Sam." 
:
"She waved from our ships upon the briny foam, 
And now they've about quit waving her back here at home. 
In her own good land she's been abused -- 
She's been burned, dishonored, denied and refused." 
:
"And the government for which she stands 
Is scandalized throughout the land. 
And she's getting threadbare and wearing thin, 
But she's in good shape for the shape she's in. 
Cause she's been through the fire before 
And I believe she can take a whole lot more." 
"So we raise her up every morning, take her down every night. 
We don't let her touch the ground And we fold her up right. 
On second thought I DO like to brag, 
"Cause I'm mighty proud of that Ragged Old Flag." 
:
~ Johnny Cash ~ *************************************************************************************
Subj: SCV Celebration in Bennettsville, SC
From: MMeadPond

On Saturday, May 16, the local chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans
will hold a memorial service at 11:00 am at the Confederate Monument on the
Courthouse Square in Bennettsville, SC. They will also have an encampment
on the Murchison School grounds, about one block from the Courthouse on
South Marlboro Street. In addition to the encampment all the Museum
buildings on Marlboro Street will be open from 1:00 - 5:00pm free of
charge. This includes:

1. Marlboro County Historical Museum in the 1902 Dr. P.M. Kinney House. 
Exhibits on Marlboro County History include things such as Mason Lee's bed,
Medical Museum, a Victorian Parlor, Strauss Carriage, Indian artifacts, old
Liquor Still, a Military Room, Quilt Display and Museum Store.

2. 1833 Bennettsville Female Academy used as a girl's school from about
1830 - 1881.

3. 1826 Jennings-Brown House used as the headquarters for General Frank
P. Blair of Union troops when Bennettsville was occupied March 6-7, 1865. 
Noted for its architectural features and hand-painted and stenciled
ceiling. Listed on Nat'l Register.

4. 1905 Murchison School was the first co-educational school in
Bennettsville.

Samples of old time refreshments will be served at each location.
Special exhbits for Saturday include: Red Shirt worn by Marlborough
Gillespie Pegues during Wade Hampton's campaign through Marlboro area; The
Third Most Important Document in US History: the SC Ordianance of
Seccession - original owned by William D. Johnson, a Marlboro County
signer; Henry Berry Lowry: Hero or Outlaw? featuring guns believed to be
used by the Lowry gang; and Signatures of Sherman: A Photographic Journey
Through Marlboro featuring photos of depicting Sherman's path of
destruction through Marlboro.

The Museum will also have a reserch table set up for those researching
their Confederate Ancestors or general Marlboro County ancestors. The
Museum does not have a lot to help with Confederate Ancestors but they do
have the applications of the Veterans for their Southern Cross of Honor,
some applications of a local UDC chapter that folded and other family
folders and genealogical books that have helped several researchers. These
are usually closed in another building while the Museum is trying to
establish a local archives however, they will be available this Saturday,
May 16.

The day's events will be held on the Murchision School grounds in
Bennettsville, (Marlboro County), SC. For more information or directions
please call the Museum at (803) 479-5624.

{{{Maureen}}} Thanks for the News....... :)
*************************************************************************************
Subj: Re: The SANDS in Civil War
From: Bipsylou
I think I might have found out who freed my gggrandfather. I am trying to find his owners will. If and when I find it I may have his brothers names on the will. If not I will gradually send for all the Sands military records. There are only a little over a dozen so chances are most of them are related.
Thanks for your reply.

D.Sands

You're so welcome. Glad we can provide a "bit of help" now and then. GOOD LUCK....
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Subj: Re: Requested Poems from Thursday Night
From: Mcsk69
Thank you for sharing and the time it took to send this E-mail to me....i hope to catch Civil War again on Thursday night...sincerely thanks again...

We're really glad you could drop by. We love new comers :) We'll be looking for you.
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Subj: GAR
From: Livasy4
Perhaps someone can help me with this one. My husband's ancestor is buried in a grave decorated with a GAR marker. There are no CW records for him in the courthouse and his wife did not file for a pension. I received a service record for a man by the same name, the age seems to be correct, but I am still uncertain about it. How do I discover which regiment he was actually in, and how did the GAR know to decorate his grave. He died in 1864. Who places these markers now?
thanks, Donna

{{Donna}} There are numerous surname lists by state that you can search. One specific set I know of is at the Family History Centers; probably one will be in your home town in one of the LDS churches there. Also Broadfoot Publishing Company is in process of completing the Union Soldiers Roster which is all known Union soldiers listed in surname order, then listing state, regiment and sometimes company if quickly available. I'm not sure at this juncture how far they are along. I do know that have completed and pulished the Confederate Roster.

Since you didn't place the GAR marker, it's probably safe to assume that another relative with sufficient information to authorize a marker has done so. Then I believe the Veteran's Administration may administer those markers. I would try attacking GAR listings (which I believe the VA has copies of) and look for you ancestor's surname. NOW THAT I'VE HAD MY SHOT AT THIS QUESTION, ANY OF YOU READERS WHO HAVE MORE INFO, PLEASE LET DONNA KNOW......
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Subj: Civil War Story - 1997
From: KINFOLK919
My son, age 32 is a real civil war enthusiast. He named his son, ROBERT EDWARD. He has read hundreds of civil war books. He gave me a video of Gettysburg with songs about the civil war. He had some of the songs on a tape so he can play them in his car.

Here is the story,

Last May he took me to Gettysburg for my first visit. We stayed there for two and a half days looking at all the sites and he told me all about who and what happened there.
As he was driving past the many monuments, I was taking movies with his camcorder and he was playing the civil war songs on the car cassette.

When we got home we played the video for his sister, (age 23), suddenly she said stop. Back it up. We did and she said look at the face. I had been taking the video through the windshield and as we rode past the row of monuments you could see a ghostly face looking back at us. Its eyes and nose were clear and the shape of it face was faint. Its head leaned to the right, then slowly to the left. It kept looking at us until we were past the row of monuments. That, plus the sad music that was being played gave all of us a chill. You wouldn't believe how real it looked.

Explanation;
The auto focus was on and the lens was moving in out as we rode down the row of monuments making the face appear to lean right and left and the eyes and nose were just caused by sunlight on the windshield. That is how he explained it. He will never convince his sister. She still says it was a ghost of Gettysburg.

As for me, I hope my son was right.

See you next week,
KinFolk919

KinFolk - what an incredible story :) I love it.
*************************************************************************************
From: Grimuspf42

Hi guys: I know this will be inspiring. I've already told my father about some of
the things in your newsletter, especially about the buried flag in prison that was smuggled
out and is in some museum in Ohio, I think it is. Will have to read it again.

Needless to say, Dad was very moved by the event. My father is 74 and EXTREMELY
PATRIOTIC!!!!!!! 

Keep up the good work. 
Later, BAG

{{{BAG}}} Thanks for the feedback :) Tell your DAD Hello from Us and show him the Johnny Cash poem in the newsletter. If there is anything we can hunt down for him, you let us know..... OK!!!! Oh I just remembered that Holm Hogs may have some letters about Silbey's flag.... I'll ask.
*************************************************************************************
From: JMorgan604

I never have taken the time to say "thank you"--so, thank you for all your news letters John Morgan

"John" Heh Heh. It's not a requirement, but we do like to know what y'all are thinking and it makes us work harder ..... Thank YOU....
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Subj: Pension
From: KBOSZO

Question: I have a ancestor that was on pension Civil War (Union) do not know any thing about his married status or family I do know he died surley by now. Pension records give no information as to date of death or where or who reported his death. Is there a some place I can contact to fine out who reported his death it may be the only source of finding if he had any relatives. I have exhausted all other means. maybe some one else has had this problem and may have a ansure as to where to go. I thank you for any information that you can give me.
John Gunder

John - thanks for you question.... I'm gonna put this in the Newsletter because there is a lot of "Wisdom" out there :) We'll see what we get. I'll also work offline and see if I can come up with any other ideas...
HELP NEEDED FROM THE "READERSHIP"!!!!!!!!!! Heh Heh.... I like that word; think I'll get it added to Websters....
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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT………….

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War".

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "fun" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of.

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, people and social happenings. In addition we dedicate one 
Thursday a month to sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save 
you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look 
on 
the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest in this topic and our Thursday 
sessions, we automatically add you to our Weekly Notices.

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we 
hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, you desire to be removed from distribution of this 
"Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste-haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events******

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Host GFS Jim and our many fill-in friends :)


5/21/98 - OPEN CHAT

5/28/98 - "The Battle of Franklin"

6/4/98 - OPEN CHAT

6/11/98 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send in your "Treasures".

6/18/98 - OPEN CHAT

"Tenative" 6/25/98 - "The Redstick War" A Guest Fireside by GFS Karen and GFS BB.

We'll See You Thursday……….
Your Hosts
GFH Jayne and GFS Jim

Hear Ye ..............Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group
Week ending 24 May 1998

Another GREAT Open Chat session was enjoyed by all Thursday night. Man Oh Man were there a ton of people drifting through. We hit the 30 plus mark 5 or 6 times throughout the evening and Jayne and I were "panting" at the end. What a great bunch. If you haven't noticed the faithful attendees also bring incredible expertise and knowledge to the group and they dig right in and help along with Jayne and I. Sooo Jayne and I would give y'all a hearty THANK YOU. That's what makes this group a unique joy to work with......

I have a very special task given to me by a mother at the NGS Conference in Denver, Colo. earlier this month. She asked if her son, Chris Gunn (9 years old) could be added to our distribution. And so we have. CHRIS, Welcome to the American Civil War History Special Interest Group. Give a great welcome to CG2585 :)

I'm going to keep this ANNOUNCEMENT up so you will all be able to plan for it when we get it actually nailed on the schedule.. GFS Karen and GFS BB are going to leave the Native American SIG for one night and come visit us to give a Guest Fireside on the "Redstick War". The role of the Native Americans in the Civil War. We're shooting for the END OF JUNE, so PASS THE WORD.... This is a rarely covered topic but so pertinent to the history we focus on in this SIG..... We're still tenative, but we're now looking at 18 June or we may have to move it out to th 23rd of July. I'll keep you posted.

FOR ALL THE 1ST TIMERS - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED YOUR PARTICIPATION..... COME AGAIN....

This version of "The Fireside" continues a series of information about Confederate Prisons.. Hope you find this useful...... This week is Richmond, Virginia, because this is a "biggie".....

Another continuing series are the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers........ So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that I thought this would also be very useful....

This upcoming Thursday is the Battle of Franklin. I would like to heartily thank Pam Newhouse (CW1865), member of our group and online friend, for her permission to use material from "The Sultana Remembered", Newsletter of the Association of Sultana Descendants and Friends of which she is the Editor. Check the Help Desk below for more information. Don't forget to check schedule are at the end of the Newsletter in the "Upcoming Schedule" area.
*************************************************************************************

THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. Meeting Logs are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters".
*************************************************************************************
CIVIL WAR MILITARY PRISON INFORMATION;
taken from "GUIDE TO THE ARCHIVES OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA"; compiled by Henry Putney Beers; "The National Archives".

Richmond, Virginia - The War Department took over a number of tobacco factories, warehouses, and other buildings in Richmond for use as military prisons. In 1861 prisoners from Bull Run were placed in Liggon's and Harwood's factories, and later in 1861 General Winder commandeered a tobacco warehouse that had belonged to W.H. Gwathmey. These buildings were in the lower part of Richmond known as the Rocketts. Officers were transferred from Liggon's factory to the neighboring Atkinson's tobacco factory. in 1862 the Confederate Government confined U.S. officers in a building at the corner of Cary and 20th Streets that had belonged to L. Libby & Son, ship chandlers and grocers. Nearby tobacco warehouses also became know after their owners as Scott's and Pemberton's Prisons. In Jan. 1863 the factory of R.H. Mayo was occupied, and early in the fall of 1863 Brigadier General Winder impressed James H. Grant's factory at Franklin and 19th Streets and Smith's factory on 21st Street. By late 1863, Yarborough's or Yarbrough's, W.H. Ross', Crew's, J.B. & A.L. Royster's, and Barrett's factories were also occupied. In June 1862 a prison camp was established on Belle Isle, a small island in the James River, whree during the war more than 20,000 prisoner's were received. During 1862-1863, Capt. Norris Montgomery commanded the Belle Isle prison camp, and he was succeeded by Lt. Virginius Bossieux. In the summer of 1864, some Union prisoners were kept in the "Jailhouse Prison" (Richmond County Jail).

By late Nov. 1863 there were 10,590 prisoners in Richmond and by Jan. 1864 over 14,000, more than half on Belle Isle under very crowede conditions exposed to the weather. Some were transferred to Danville and many more to the newly established Andersonville military prison. Officers were removed from Richmond to Danville, Salisbury and Macon; later, in Feb. 1865, many were brought back for exchange. The prisoners were escorted away on Rochmond's evacuation in Apr. 1865 but escaped.

Before the designation of a Commissary General of Prisoners the commanders of the Department of Henrico had general charge of the military prisons in Richmond. AIGO Special Order 52 of Mar. 3, 1865, relieved Brigidier General Gardner from duty at Richmond and placed Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell, commander of the Department of Richmond, in charge of the prisons:
Successive commandants of the military prisons:
Capt. Archibald C. Godwin
Capt. Henry Wirtz
Capt. George W. Alexander.
Capt. Thomas P. Turner, Oct. 27, 1862

Frank L. Byrne, "Libby Prison; a Study in Emotions, "Journal of Southern History, 24:430-444 (Nov. 1958); C.S.A. Congress, House of Representative, Appointed to Enquire into the Treatment of Prisoners at Castle Thunder (n.p., 1863?; printed also in Official Records .... Armies, ser. 2, Vol. 5, p. 871-924); William H. Jeffrey, Richmond Prisons, 1861-1862, Compiled from the Original Records kept by the Confederate Government (St. Johnsbury, Vt., ca. 1863). A report of the Joint Select Committee on the Conduct of the War on "Returned Prisoners, " May 9, 1864, H. Rep. 67, 38 Cong., 1 sess., Serial 1206 (Washington, 1864), contains testimony of Federal prisoners who had been confined in Confederate prisons in Richmond.

On May 2, 1865, Col. Richard D. Cutts, a U.S. officer who had been charged with collecting Confederate records in Richmond, forwarded to the War Department three boxes of records of the headquarters of the Richmond military prisons and the next day he sent to Washington three large volumes. On July 17, 1865, Lt. Col. Albert Ordway, Provost Marshal General in Richmond, sent the letter book of Clarence Morfit to the Adjutant General in Washington. These records are described below:

Record Group 109. -- A letter and order book of the Richmond military prisons office, Jan. 20, 1862-Dec. 15, 1863 (ch. IX, vol. 199 1/2) contains copies of letters and orders of General Winder and Captains Godwin, Wirz, Turner, and W.S. Winder, instructions to the commander of the prisons, letters received by the Winders, letters from S.S. Baxter and Robert Ould, and orders regarding the administration of the prisons. This book is a copy made by the War Records Office in 1886 from the original lent by Col. Edward H. Ripley of Rutland, Vt. A copy is also with the records of the Office of the U.S. Commissaay General of Prisoners (Record Group 249, misc. records, vol. 106 1/2). A letters-sent press copy book, Mar. 7 1863 - 1 Apr, 1865 (ch. IX, vol. 232), of Capt. Clarence Morfit, quartermaster of the Richmond prisons, contains letters to General Winder, the Quartermaster General, the Richmond quartermaster, and others.

Record Group 249 -- Registers of prisoners entitled "Nominal lists of Prisoners of War Received at Richmond, "July 23, 1861 - Apr 2, 1865 (misc. records, vols. 93, 94, 96, 97, 99 and 101-106), show the date of receipt, name, rank, company, regiment, State, date and place of capture, date and reason for discharge (transfer, parole, or exchange), by whose order discharged (General Winder or Colonel Ould), where sent, and additional information about prisoners paroled, exchanged or desceased. They include Federal military and naval prisoners of war, political prisoners from the South and the North, and foreigners. A register of Federal officers kept in Libby Prison, Sept. 24, 1862 - Mar. 25, 1865 (misc. records, vol. 100), contains similar information and is similarily arranged. A register of Negro prisoners, 1862-1865 (misc. records, part of vol. 69), supplies abundant information on their status and disposition, and there is a register of civilian prisoners, 1862-1863 (misc. records, vol. 98). Daybooks of arrivals at military prisons in Richmond, June 1861-Apr. 1865 (misc. records, vols. 32, 52-53, 58-61, and 63-67, 8 in.), give the prisoner's number and name, rank, company, regiment, place and date of capture, and sometimes information as to disposition. Daybooks of the arrival and disposition of prisoners, Nov. 15, 1862 - Mar. 28, 1865 (misc. records, vols. 70-91, 10 in.), contain similar information, "Roll Call Books, " Oct. 18, 1861-Jan. 24, 1865 (misc. records, vols. 119-127, 6 in.), contain morning and evening reports of the numbers of prisoners in the different prisons and hospitals.

Other records are more specialized. A list of noncommissioned officers and privates captured at Reams' Station, Va., Aug. 25, 1864, and received at Richmond, Aug. 27, 1864 (misc. records, vol. 68), shows the prisoner's name, rank, company, and place of birth. A daybook of prisoners received at Barrett's factory, prison no. 4, June 30-Sept. 2, 1862 (misc. records, vol. 55), shows the prisoner's number, name, rank, company, regiment, State, and place and date of capture. Morning reports of prisoners at Belle Isle Prison, Sept. 1-Oct. 8, 1864 (misc. records, vol. 34), give the prisoners' number, name, rank, company, regiment, date hospitalized, date discharged and disease. A list of prisoners received at Libby Prison in May 1863 and paroled on May 13 (misc. records, vol. 62), and a list of vaccinated prisoners of war in Richmond prisons and Hospitals, 1863-64 (misc. records, vol. 44), show the prisoner's name rank, company, regiment, and age. Lists of prisoners of war released at City Point, Va., by Confederate authorities, July 19 - Aug 3, 1862 (misc. records, vol. 57), show prisoner's number, name, rank, company, regiment, and State. A register of visitors to prisoners in Richmond, July 8, 1861 - Mar. 30, 1862 (misc. records, vol. 59, p. 1-5), shows names of visitors, names of prisoners visited, and kind of permit issued. Lists of prisoners of war received at military prisons in Richmond, June 1862, (2 in.), show the prisoner's name, rank, company, regiment, State, and where and when captured. A list of Federal prisoners paroled before the battles [1862] before Richmond, (1 1/2 in.), shows the same information. These lists were prepared for the Confederate Agent for the Exchange of Prisoners.

Incomplete records of the Military prison Hospital (General Hospital No. 21) are also available. A register of patients, Mar. 1, 1863-June 9, 1864 (misc. records, vol. 66A), also lists names of hospital employees. There is a register of prisoners of war and U.S. Army deserters admitted to the hospital, Mar. 9, 1863-Apr. 2, 1865 (misc. records, vols. 20 and 21). For use with these records is an alphabetical name index ("Index to Miscellaneous Records of Prisoners of War -- Except Deaths"). Other prison hospital records are described under the Surgeon General's Office, and other records relating to military prisoners in Richmond are described under the Department of Richmond.

Records in Other Custody. -- The Ryder Collection of Confederate Archives in the Tufts College Library contains 455 morning reports of prisoners in the Richmond military prisons on printed forms, Mar. 22, 1862-Dec 16, 1863. These reports show the number of prisoners of war, civilian prisoners, Confederates, Federal deserters, and Negroes on hand, received, or transferred each day. on other forms are 117 passes, Jan. 7, 1863-July 29, 1864, issued by order of Generals Winder and Gardner and Majors Turner and Carrington to visitors to Libby Prison. An alphabetical list of the names of persons to whom passes were issued is in Historical Records Survey, Massachusetts, "A Calendar of the Ryder Collection of Confederate Archives at Tufts Collete, p. 157-159 (Boston, 1940).
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U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers.............................

The next stage of series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

The major types of military records kept by federal and state governments (continued) --


National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers

Congress established national homes for disabled soldiers in 1866. Veterans were eligible for admittance if they were honorably discharged; had served in the regular; volunteer, or militia forces mustered into federal service; were disabled and without support; and were unable to earn a living. In 1930 the homes were combined with other agencies to form the Veterans Administration (now the Department of Veteran Affairs). 

The registers are divided into four sections: military, domestic, home, and general remarks. The military section includes information such as enlistment, rank, company, regiment, and discharge. The domestic section includes the veteran's birthplace, age, height, religion, occupation, residence, marital status, and name and address of nearest relative. The home section includes the veteran's rate of pension, date of admission to the home, discharge, death date, and burial place.

Some reports published by the Board of Managers for the National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers contain alphabetical rosters of soldiers. The rosters provide name, rank, company, organization, length of service, war, pension rate, burthplace, admission date, age when admitted, and status (including death date).

The national homes were in --

Bath, New York ..... Bath Branch
Biloxi, Mississippi Biloxi Home
Danville, Illinois Danville Branch
Dayton, Ohio Central Branch
Hot Springs, South Dakota Battle Mountain Sanitarium
Johnson City, Tennessee Mountain Branch
Kecoughton, Virginia Southern Branch
Leavenworth, Kansas Western Branch
Marion, Indiana Marion Branch
Rosebud, Oregon Rosebud Branch
St. Petersburg, Florida St. Petersburg Home
Sawtelle, California Pacific Branch
Togus, Maine Eastern Branch
Tuskegee, Mississippi Tuskegee Home
Wood, Wisconsin Northwestern Branch


.........................to be continued...
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The Sultana Remembered; a Newsletter of the Association of Sultana Descendants and Friends.......

A specialized area of Civil War History is the tragedy of the Sultana in April of 1865. We have given a number of "Firesides" about this incident and in the process of doing this, I was astounded to learn that one of our members, CW1865 (Pam Newhouse) was the Editor of a quarterly newsletter "The Sultana Remembered". Pam has graciously granted permission for us to use material from the newsletter and as I have done so, I was thinking that some of you may have ancestors who were part of this event and might like to become a part of this group. You can therefore obtain more information or get the newsletter by writting to Pam at 4081 Clark Rd., Ann Arbor, MI. 48105. I believe the yearly subscription runs around $6.00, but you can check with Pam on that. 

I quote from their fall 1990 submission :

"[The Battle of Franklin] was the bloodiest battle of modern times in any war. 
It is the blackest page in the history of the war of the Lost Cause. 
It was the finishing stroke to the independence of the Southern Confederacy. 
I was there................."

- Pvt. Sam Waking,
1.st Tennessee Regiment
Army of Tennessee
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From: PAPFP

{{{Donna}}} THANKS for this neat information..... 
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
From: PeterB Atl

G'morning Jim,
Many thanks for your interest in my newsletter on Confederate MBRs (Medals, Badges, Ribbons) and for your invitation to become your site's "expert" concerning them. Don't know how much of an "expert" I am - but I have been studying them for many years. It never ceases to amaze me, however, how many pieces I see that I've never seen before. Sorta lends truth to the old saying "the more you learn, the more you realize there is that you don't know" (something like that, anyway).

To directly respond to your invitation, I'll be glad to try and help your audience identify their MBRs, with two stipulations:
1) I can only assist with Confederate items. I know absolutely nothing about GAR (Grand Army of the Republic) or, for that matter, any yankee pieces. I can, however refer you to someone who might be willing to help with those.
2) Like most folks, I gotta make a living - and much as I love Confederate MBRs, they don't pay the bills. So I have a job like everyone else. The point is that your readers will have to have a little patience if they send me an inquiry - my online time is very limited. I will respond to 'em, but most often not immediately. OK?

Anyone interested in my Newsletter can obtain a free sample copy by sending a #10 SASE and requesting it to:
Peter Bertram, Editor
The CSA-MBR Newsletter
P.O. Box 451421
Atlanta, GA 31145

Once again, Jim - thanks for your interest and for the invitation.
Y'all take care now............
Peter 
peterbatl@aol.com

"Peter" - Thank you for your prompt response and willingness to help our group out. NOTICE TO THE MEMBERSHIP, ALL 700 OF YOU Heh Heh!!! PLEASE HONOR PETER'S STIPULATIONS LISTED ABOVE..... HE HAS GRACIOUSLY INDICATED HE WILL ASSIST AND THEREFORE WE TREAT OUR "EXPERTS" WITH TENDER LOVING CARE, AND RESPOND WITH POSITIVE GLEE WHEN WE DO RECEIVE ANY FEEDBACK FROM THEM, WHATEVER THE TIME FRAME. "DON'T ABUSE HIS WILLINGNESS" !! Ha Ha Ha I'm pretty good on the soapbox, Huh????? Peter again, GFH Jayne and I thank you.....
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A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of Interest and Pleas for HELP................

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A Memorial Day "Sharing"
From: FI WATROUS

Seemed appropriate at this Memorial Day time. Could be about any war.
Ike
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

INSIDE THE WALL

At first there was no place for us to go until someone put up
that Black Granite Wall. 

Now, every day and night, my Brothers and my Sisters wait to see the
many people from places afar file in front of this Wall. Many stopping
briefly and many for hours and some that come on a regular basis.

It was hard at first, not that it's gotten any easier, but it seems
that many of the attitudes towards that war that we were involved
in have changed. I can only pray that the ones on the other side
have learned something, and more Walls as this one needn't be built.

Several members of my unit and many that I did not recognize have
called me to the Wall by touching my name that is engraved upon it.
The tears aren't necessary but are hard even for me to hold back.
Don't feel guilty for not being with me, my Brothers. This was my
destiny, as it is yours to be on that side of the Wall.

Touch the Wall, my Brothers, so that we can share in the memories
that we had. I have learned to put the bad memories aside and remember
only the pleasant times that we had together. Tell our other Brothers
out there to come and visit me, not to say Good Bye but to say Hello
and be together again, even for a short time and to ease that pain of
loss that we all share.

Today, an irresistible and loving call comes from the Wall. As I
approach I can see an elderly lady and as I get closer I recognize her....... 
It's Momma! As much as I have looked forward to this day,
I have also regretted it because I didn't know what reaction I would
have. Next to her, I suddenly see my wife and immediately think how
hard it must of been for her to come to this place and my mind floods
with the pleasant memories of 30 years past. There's a young man in a
military uniform standing with his arm around her......
My God!......It has to be my son.

Look at him trying to be the man without a tear in his eye. I yearn to
tell him how proud I am, seeing him standing tall, straight and proud
in his uniform. Momma comes closer and touches the Wall and I feel the
soft and gentle touch I had not felt in so many years. Dad has crossed
to this side of the Wall and through our touch, I try to convey to her
that Dad is doing fine and is no longer suffering or feeling pain. 
I see my wife's courage building as she sees Momma touch the Wall and
she approaches and lays her hand on my waiting hand. All the emotions,
feelings and memories of three decades past flash between our
touch and I tell her that it's all right. 

Carry on with your life and don't worry about me......I can see as I
look into her eyes that she hears and understands me and a big burden
has been lifted from her. I watch as they lay flowers and other
memories of my past. My lucky charm that was taken from me and
sent to her by my CO, a tattered and worn teddy bear that I can barely
remember having as I grew up as a child and several medals that I had
earned and were presented to my wife. One of them is the Combat
Infantry Badge that I am very proud of and I notice that my son
is also wearing this medal. I had earned mine in the jungles of
Vietnam and he had probably earned his in the deserts of Iraq. 

I can tell that they are preparing to leave and I try to take a mental
picture of them together, because I don't know when I will see them
again. I wouldn't blame them if they were not to return and can only
thank them that I was not forgotten. My wife and Momma near the
Wall for one final touch and so many years of indecision, fear and sorrow
are let go. As they turn to leave, I feel my tears that had not flowed
for so many years form as if dew drops on the other side of the Wall.
They slowly move away with only a glance over their shoulder.

My son suddenly stops and slowly returns. He stands straight and proud
in front of me and snaps a salute. Something makes him move tothe
Wall and he puts his hand upon the Wall and touches my tears that
had formed on the face of the Wall and I can tell that he senses my
presence there and the pride and the love that I have for him. He
falls to his knees and the tears flow from his eyes and I try my best
to reassure him that it's all right and the tears do not make him any
less of a man. As he moves back wiping the tears from his eyes,
he silently mouths We WILL meet someday but in the meanwhile, 
go on your way......

There is no hurry.......There is no hurry at all. 

As I see them walk off in the distance, I yell out to THEM and to 
EVERYONE "THANKS FOR REMEMBERING" and as others on this side of the Wall join in, 
I notice that the US Flag that so proudly flies in front of us everyday, 
is flapping and standing proudly straight out in the wind today,............

"THANK YOU ALL FOR REMEMBERING"... 

For he today that sheds his blood with me, shall be my brother. 

-- AUTHOR UNKNOWN --

{{Ike}} I'm bawling.................................. ........thank you. It fits!!

************************************************************************************
From: TG Roberts
To: GFS Jim

Question: 

Any information or guides to Union military prisons??

"TG" I have a number of references for you"

1. The Official Army Operational Reports contain a "wealth" of information related to Union Prisons. I have listed 3 of the primary volumes which contain this information. These volumes reside at various libraries and of course at the National Archives.

O.R.--SERIES II--VOLUME VI [S# 119]
UNION AND CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, ETC., RELATING TO PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE FROM JUNE 11, 1863, TO MARCH 31, 1864.--#1
O.R.--SERIES II--VOLUME VII [S# 120]
UNION & CONFED. CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, ETC., RELATING TO PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE FROM APRIL 1, 1864, TO DECEMBER 31, 1864.--#1
O.R.--SERIES II--VOLUME VIII [S# 121]
UNION AND CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, ETC., RELATING TO PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE FROM JANUARY 1, 1865, TO THE END.--#1

2. An excellent book that is "the Best" I have seen is the "Portals To Hell"; Military Prisons of the Civil War by Lonnie R. Speer just published in 1997. It is a hummer.....

I'll stop there. That will keep you busy for awhile :D Hope that helps.
*************************************************************************************
Subj: Prison/Hospital 
From: GENESGENE

a BIG question ?
Do you know anything of the gratiot Street Prison in St Louis,Mo in the early 1860's.
Apparently it was used to house disidents against the U.S government.
An ancestor for whom I have searched for many years is shown as having died
in gratiot Street prison, having been sent there by the Provost Marshal of St Genevieve Co, Mo.He was arrested for using abusive language against the U.S. government,and for stating he would join the southern army and levy war against the U.S if they tried to draft him into the U.S army ,he was also accused of inciting persons to disloyalty,and using very threatening language toward Union men in general.
Apparently he was considered very dangerous, as he was to be sent to prison,
this punishment was marked out in the letter of arrest, and he gave his "parole of honor" and entered into a two thousand dollar bond that if broken ,the punishment could be death,or other military punishment.
He was arrest Nov1st 1862 and died Dec 4, 1862.Cause pneumonia 

There was a death certificate issued and it shows as a military hospital 
Gratiot Street Hospital .He is buried in Jefferson Barracks as"Citizen'
St Genevieve Co ,Rebel, in Rebel section, but his marker has another name. 

Where could I look for more information. This came from Old Military and Civil Records Textual Archives Services Division 
Thanks Jeany

{{Jeany}} Sounds like your records are "Right On". Oddly enough, I just purchased a book on the advice of Bulldogtjr (Ted) called the "Portals of Hell", Military Prisons of the Civil War, by Lonnie R. Speer. There is an excellent historical writeup of the Gratiot Street Prison in St. Louis. Again oddly coincidental, it started its life in St. Louis as McDowell's Medical College in 1847 at Eighth and Gratiot streets. It was finally converted into a prison 21 December 1861. Check this book out at the library if they have a copy (printed in 1997). Or I know that Amazon books on the Web has it in stock. http://amazon.com
*************************************************************************************

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT………….

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War".

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "fun" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, people and social happenings. In addition we dedicate one 
Thursday a month to sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest in this topic and our Thursday 
sessions, we automatically add you to our Weekly Notices.

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, you desire to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste-haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events******

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Host GFS Jim and our many fill-in friends :)


5/28/98 - "The Battle of Franklin"

6/4/98 - OPEN CHAT

6/11/98 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send in your "Treasures".

"Tenative" 6/18/98 - "The Redstick War" A Guest Fireside by GFS Karen and GFS BB.

6/25/98 - OPEN CHAT

We'll See You Thursday……….
Your Hosts
GFH Jayne and GFS Jim

Hear Ye...........  Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group
Week ending 31 May 1998

I'm sitting here tonight thinking what a fine evening we had last Thursday telling about the Battle of Franklin.  I've got my Clanad CD on listening to some really "fine" Celtic music being sung by my three favorite Celtic Enya, Moira, and Loreena, doing this "Fireside".  AND on top of that, I'm halfway through Jeff Sharra's new book "The Final Measure".  Oh man, I've died and gone to Heaven.  Ha ha ha....  And I have to note that what a crowd was in the Chat Room Thursday... another great bunch of first timers.  At this rate, I'll have to start my own Bulk Mailer business

THANK YOU, THANK YOU for all the "Birthday Emails".  It was a beautiful Cake :D  There were so many I'm still reading some.  My wife is just sitting here shaking her head, wondering WHO all these people are....  LOL  Y'all have made me day.  "Jayne you devil"  :-)

Gotta tell you this story from the item last week about adding young Chris Gunn to our list..  "Mom" was in the Chat Room and told us all that Chris was soooo excited to see his name mentioned that he started showing it all around the neighborhood...  Heh Heh I just love it.  "Chris", invite all your friends over one night and if "Mom" will let you stay up that late, we'll try to answer all the questions you can come up with.  :)  Jayne and I repeat a Welcome to you...  

I'm going to keep this ANNOUNCEMENT up so you will all be able to plan for it when we get it actually nailed on the schedule...  GFS Karen and GFS BB are going to leave the Native American SIG for one night and come visit us to give a Guest Fireside on the "Redstick War".  The role of the Native Americans in the Civil War.  We're shooting for the END OF JUNE, so PASS THE WORD...  This is a rarely covered topic but so pertinent to the history we focus on in the SIG....  We're still tentative, but we're now looking at 18 June or we may have to move it out to the 23rd of July.  I'll keep you posted.

A SPECIAL THANK YOU to Ike and Nancy Watrous for providing the incredible poem "Inside the Wall" which we published in last week's Fireside Weekly.  Ike and Nancy, I got a flood of emails last week want me to THANK YOU for provide such....  Sooo  as a dutiful editor, 'dat's what I'm doin...

FOR ALL THE 1ST TIMERS - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED YOUR PARTICIPATION....  COME AGAIN....  

This version of "The Fireside" continues a series of information about Confederate Prisons.  Hope you find this useful... This week is only Salisbury, North Carolina, because this is good size.....

Another continuing series are the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers....  So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that I thought this would also be very useful...

This upcoming Thursday in the OPEN CHAT, bring your questions, requests, frustrations, and stories.  Don't forget to check the schedule at the end of the Newsletter in the "Upcoming Schedule" area.

**************************************************

THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out.  Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note:  Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings:  keyword "roots", after which will bring you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum.  Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files".  At that point select "Civil War Files"  Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History Lectures: as the Lecture Subject.  Meeting Logs are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting Logs and Newsletters".

**************************************************

CIVIL WAR MILITARY PRISON INFORMATION:

taken from "GUIDE TO THE ARCHIVES OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICAN".  Compiled by Henry Putney Beers. "The National Archives"

Salisbury, North Carolina - Early in November 1861 the War Department bought an abandoned cotton factory at Salisbury for use as a military prison' the factory and five adjacent buildings were enclosed by a board fence and prepared for the reception of prisoners.  In Dec. 1861,the first prisoners arrived, and on July 16, 1862, General Winder reported a total of 780 prisoners at Salisbury.  Early in October 1864 7,500 prisoners were transferred from Belle Isle (Richmond).  The total number of prisoners held in Salisbury on November, 1864, was 8,740.  In March 1865, more than 2,279 prisoners were sent to Richmond for exchange, the rest of the prisoners were later removed, and the prison was turned over to the Ordinance Department.

Successive Commandants of this prison:
    Maj. George C. Gibbs, Jan 11, 1862
    Capt. Swift Galloway, Sept. 14, 1863
    Capt. George W. Alexander, May 1864
    Maj. John H. Gee, Aug. 24, 1864
    Brig. Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Dec. 20, 1864

Adolphus W. Mangum, "Salisbury Prison", in Walter Clark, ed., "Histories of the Several Regiments and Battalions from North Carolina in the Great War 1861-1865, vol. 4, pp. 745-772 (5 vols.; Goldsboro, 1901); Ida B. Williams, "John Henry Gee, Physician and Soldier", "Georgia Historical Quarterly", 45:238-244 (Sept. 1961).

Record Group 249 -- An undated index of prisoners of war who enlisted in the Confederate service (misc. records, vol.13) gives name, rank, regiment, company. arm, and State.  Also in this record group are a register of patients in the military prison hospital, Oct. 1, 1864-Apr. 8, 1865 (misc. records, vol. 5), a register of hospital patients (prisoners and guards) returned to duty, May 2-Dec17, 1864 (misc. records, vol. 12, pp 80-112), and a register of patients dated May 1-Nov. 14, 1864 (misc. records vol. 12, pp 1-75).  A register of deaths, May 7, 1864-Feb 19, 1865 (misc. records, vol. 12, pp 127-192 and 200-257), shows name, rank, company, regiment, disease and date of death.

A list of the names of soldiers who had served court-martial sentences at Salisbury and who were to be restored to duty is in AIGO special Order 285, Dec. 1, 1864.  C.S.A. War Department, [Communication from the Secretary of War, Enclosing  a List of the Civilian Prisoners in Custody at Salisbury, N.C., under Military Authority, Richmond, 1863] contains a list of 133 prisoners with residences, occupations, and causes of arrest.  The proceedings of a military commission that tried Maj. John H. Gee at Raleigh, N.C. in 1866 (Record Group 153, Records of the Office of the U. S. Judge Advocate General, file MM3972) contain wartime documents. Records of the prison hospital are described under the Surgeon General's Office.

Record in Other Custody: -- The Bradley T. Johnson papers in Duke University Library contain correspondence, Feb 1-Apr. 21, 1865 with the War Department and Gov. Zebulon B. Vance of North Carolina and telegrams, Jan, Apr. 1865, concerning the administration of the Salisbury military prison.  Included are a few communications from Capt. James M. Goodman and Maj. Mason Moffit, quartermasters.

.......................................to be continued

**************************************************

U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers............

The next stage of series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records available for Civil War researchers and those available through FHC network.

The major types of military records kept by federal and state governments (continued)--

Veterans' and Lineage Organization Records

Records of veterans' organizations and lineage societies may be found at their national headquarters or at state archives, historical societies, and public libraries.  Some societies require members to submit applications documenting their ancestry back to a soldier.  They may publish membership lists and other records.  For eligibility requirements, write to the society's national headquartersl

Biographies

You can find biographical sketches of prominent military figures in published biographical dictionaries.  The FHC has the following:

Cullum, George W.  "Biographical Register of Officers and Graduates of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.T. 3d ed 9 vols".  Boston and New York; Houghton Mifflin, 1866-1950.  (FHL book 974.731/W1 M2cu vols. 1-7, 9: films 1,697.28t-88.)  The registers, 1802 to 1950, include state of birth and date and place of death of each graduate.

Spiller, Roger J., ed. "Dictionary of American Military Biography". 3 vols. Westport, Conn; Greenwood Press, 1984. (FHL, book 973 D36da)

"Webster's American Military Biographies". Springfield, Mass.: G&C Merriman Company, Publishers, 1978.  (FHL Book 973 D3wb).

...................................to be continued....

*************************************************

Peter Bertram has consented to experiment with us as our Confederate Medal expert and has given us a connection to Roger Heiple who covers the GAR side of the medals.  As you can see from Roger's note, he has consented to help us out as well.  Please note his comments an abide their requests.  Also check out his home page :)

From: CGBD86A@prodigy.com (MR ROGER L HEIPLE)

Hi Jim

I would certainly like to help anyone interested in Grand Army of the Republic materials.  I have GAR homepage that covers most of the basics regarding membership badges, officer badges, encampment badges, ribbons, uniforms, and more.

One thing I do request is that the person e-mailing me, give me his/her name.  I get message like this, "I've got a ________ badge, how much is it worth" with no name.  Well, he (or she) doesn't get a reply.  I am not an appraiser, but I will go to all lengths to help someone ID a badge, document, etc.

So count me in,
Roger Heiple
GAR homepage http://pages.prodigy.com/CGBD86A/garhp.htm

"Roger" - Thank you very much for consenting to help us out...    :-)

*************************************************

Subj: MURPHY'S LAWS FOR GENEALOGISTS
From: NPeter2089

Here are some oldies but goodies, maybe will fit in the Fireside.....  

The public ceremony in which your distinguished ancestor participated, and at which the platform collapsed under him turned out to be a hanging.

When at last, after much hard work you have solved the mystery you've been working on for two years, you aunt says "I could have told you that"

Your grandmother's maiden name that you have searched for for four years was on a letter in a box in the attic all the time.

You never asked your father about his family when he was alive because you weren't interested in genealogy then.

The will you need is in the safe on board the Titanic.

Copies of old newspapers have holes occurring only on the surnames.

John, son of Thomas, the immigrant whom your relatives claim as the family progenitor, died on board ship age 10.

Your grandfather's newspaper obituary states that he died leaving no issue.

The keeper of the vital records you need has just been insulted by another genealogist.

The relative who had all the family photographs gave them all to her daughter who has no interest in genealogy and won't share.

The only record you find for your grandfather is that his property was sold at a sheriff's sale for insolvency.

The one document that would supply the missing link in your dead end line has been lost due to fire, flood or war.

The spelling of your European ancestor's name bears no relationship to its current spelling or pronunciation

None of the pictures in your recently deceased grandmother's photo album have names written on them (boy, can I relate to that one).

No one in your family ever did anything noteworthy, owned property, was sued or was named in wills.

You learn that your great aunt's executor just sold her life's collection of family genealogical materials to a flea market dealer "somewhere in New York City"

Ink fades and paper deteriorated at a rate inversely proportional to the value of the data recorded.

The 37 Volume, sixteen thousand page history of your county of origin isn't indexed.

You finally find your grandparent's wedding records and discover that the bride's father was named John Smith.

    ENJOY.................. NADINE

{{{Nadine}}} LOL - I love 'um  :-)

***********************************************

From:  Jhaw406755

Thank you for the Weekly Fireside.  I'll try to join the chat as often as I can.   My husband had a grandfather, 2 great grandfathers, and uncle and a cousin who were in the union army during the Civil War.  My grandmother was raised on a farm near Shepardsville in Jefferson Co., West Virginia.  Interestingly, y husband's grandfather was in that battle.  It has been said that family farm land is still filled with shell casings.  The family were Quakers and did not fight, but they were reported to be on of the stops on the Underground railway.  Their farm house, which was built around 1750, is till standing.

Hope to meet you on the chat.  

Jhaw - we're glad you found us.  Since your family were Quakers, it brings to mind a painting "The Quaker Line" by Julian Scott in 1872, which hangs in the Confederate Museum in New Orleans, LA.  The scene depicts a humiliating day for "Little George" on the Peninsula Campaign.  In April of 1862, McClellan, with his 105,000 man Federal army approached the entrenched position of Confederate Maj. Gen. John B. Magruder at Yorktown, Virginia, with extreme caution, convinced that 100,000 Rebels were waiting to pounce.  The truth was that Magruder had only one-tenth that many men, but kept them moving along his line to create the illusion of more troops.  To complete the illusion, Magruder employed "Quaker guns", logs cut to resemble cannon.  McClellan learned Magruder's secret when Union troops entered the abandoned Confederate line in May 1862.  LOL

***********************************************

From Mcsk69

thanks for the Fireside.... it takes work to produce these bits of info and each of us needs to remember to let you know that you are appreciated for this effort....  mcsk69@aol.com

Mcsk69 - It's indeed our pleasure.  We're most satisfied you get some research worth and enjoyment out of them  :-)

***********************************************

From:  LinLouVan

I've never stopped to say, "thank you" for sending the Weekly Fireside.  I read every word and print them to save, hoping that someday I'll know enough about my Civil War ancestors to know what questions to ask.  I rarely get by the Thursday night chat, but really think I get more our of the Fireside.  Here is a little something I thought you might enjoy - or might like to share even though it's not strictly CW.

And the friend who sent it to me did not give a source. (You'd think everyone doing genealogy would know to do that, wouldn't you?) If anyone knows the author, I'd like to know.

The Dash

This poem has been removed from the website at the request of the author, Linda Ellis, due to copyright.  

{{{Linda}}}  Great poem :-)  Thanks for sharing and I'm glad the Fireside Weekly hits the mark :)  We love to see you all at the CHAT, but we know the schedules are rough, so that's why the Newsletter exists.

**************************************************

From:  Motpat

Thank you for all the excellent information which you send to me.  Both grandfathers fought in the Civil War on the side of the Confederates.  One was a prisoner in Ohio I believe.  I have the loyalty oath he signed in Kentucky after his release.
Thanks again--you guys are great.

Motpat :-)  We're also fun to be with, "cause we "giggle" alot and Bull tells GREAT stories to us young PUPS...  Heh Heh...     Seriously, we thank you  :-)

**************************************************

From Grimuspf42

As always, you guys do such a great job.  Thanks for such valuable history at our fingertips.
You have a good day.
Later.
BAG

Thanks BAG :-)  We love the feedback, and it makes us work harder  :-)

**************************************************

Subj:  Re: Records of Cherokee Troops
From: GFS Karen

The records can be found under the Compiled Service Records of the Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Confederate Government Microcopy 258

Rolls 77-78 National Archive Publications.
I have the other roll numbers at home and will eamil them to you all when I get back on the 8th of June. Also I have the Muster Roll of Drew's Regiment of Mounted Riflemen, Cherokee Volunteers. Dated Nov. 5,1861, also Field and Staff listings.
I will be happy to do a lookup for you when I get back.
Please hold email till afte the 8th of June as I will not be online at all next week.
Bye
Karen

{{{Karen}}} You're a gem!!!!   Karen's note above was in response to a request from Skye576, but this is such good info, I have added it this week.

*************************************************

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT………….

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War".

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "fun" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, people and social happenings. In addition we dedicate one 
Thursday a month to sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest in this topic and our Thursday 
sessions, we automatically add you to our Weekly Notices.

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, you desire to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste-haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events******

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Host GFS Jim and our many fill-in friends :)

6/4/98 - OPEN CHAT

6/11/98 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night.  Don't forget to send in your "Treasures"

"Tentative" 6/18/98 - "The Redstick War"  A Guest Fireside by two great ladies GFS Karen and GFS BB

6/25/98 - OPEN CHAT

7/2/98 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night.  NOTE:  I'm doing this early this month as I'll be traveling the next weeks

7/9/98 - OPEN CHAT

7/16/98 - OPEN CHAT

We'll see you Thursday.....
Your Hosts
GFH Jayne and GFS Jim


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