March 2004 Weekly Fireside Newsletters

Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 07 March 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line. 

NOTE from Jayne:  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had recently.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter.

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NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
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Thursday and Friday were OPEN CHAT nights and what a great time we had!!  My thanks to SteveSCA and TTubes14 (my old partner Tom) who "helped" me answer some of the tougher questions.  Tom had some trivia questions up his sleeve, I did too but told Tom his wasn't allowed to answer, he had to give the others a chance first.  :D   

Now, both Steve and Tom are interested to see if folks would be interested in tours...   Steve with a group to Ft. Delaware perhaps, and Tom with a group to Gettysburg.   And don't forget, too, IllinoisCW has offered to do a tour of some of the western battlefields.  They asked to put out some feelers to see if there would be any interest.  Send me an email with your thoughts about it and where'd you like to go.  Tom has said he'll be available any weekend except the first week in July. 

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MUSIC
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If you have some favorite music, tell us a little about it and we'll put it here in the newsletter.

A couple of weeks ago Jim told us about Eva Cassidy and as I told you the next week that I went and bought the "Songbird" album he suggested.  Well.....   I've become addicted to her music...   Her rendition of "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" just blows me away everytime I listen to it.  You gotta hear her!!! 

I'm one of those strange folks who likes to have a radio on all night.  So I don't disturb hubby, I have a speaker under my pillow.  Everynight about 1:45 AM, on a local radio station, I hear the following song...   it also brings tears to my eyes.  I have NO idea what album it is on, but you should hear this one too,  Josh Groban singing "You Raise Me Up"   What a voice!!!! 

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well. 

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to. 

Also on Thursday 8-9PM ET: Trace Your Civil War Ancestors in Ancestral Digs. (on AOL only) Join HOST FMLY Wolfrd and HOST FMLY Heathr to discuss ancestral searches from the Civil War period

You can visit the other Genealogy chats by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at   Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

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"THE BOOK SHELF"
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If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.  


* * * * * * * * * *

http://www.roberteleecwrt.org/reviews.html
http://www.cwbr.com/

Check out some book reviews at the above websites.

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--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs,
and Poems evenings)
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"Oh, Shenandoah"
        
Oh, Shenandoah, I long to hear you
Look away, you rollin' river
Oh, Shenandoah, I long to hear
Look away, we're bound away
Across the wide Missouri.

Now the Missouri is a mighty river
Look away, you rollin' river
Indians camp a long her border
Look away, we're bound away
Across the wide Missouri.

Well, a white man loved an Indian maiden
Look away, you rollin' river
With notions his canoe was laden
Look away, we're bound away
Across the wide Missouri.

Shenandoah, I love your daughter
Look away, you rollin' river
It was for her I'd cross the water
Look away, we're bound away
Across the wide Missouri.

For seven long years I courted Sally
Look away, you rollin' river
Seven more years I longed to have her
Look away, we're bound away
Across the wide Missouri.

Well, it's fare-thee-well, my dear, I'm bound to leave you
Look away, you rollin' river
Shenandoah, I will not deceive you
Look away, we're bound away
Across the wide Missouri.
Thanks Barb for sending this...... 

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DID YOU KNOW?
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Steve Teeft of www.dixieresearch.com has graciously allowed me to use the following from his "Picket Post" newsletter of the Buffalo Guards Camp, Sons of Confederate Veterans

Some forgotten Facts about those Black Americans that served and supported the Confederacy

Fact - Nearly 180,000 Black Southerners, from Virginia alone, provided logistical support for the Confederate military. Many were highly skilled workers. These included a wide range of jobs: nurses, military engineers, teamsters, ordnance department workers, brakemen, firemen, harness makers, blacksmiths, wagon-makers, boatmen, mechanics, wheelwrights, etc. In the 1920'S Confederate pensions were finally allowed to those workers that were still living. Many thousands more served in other Confederate States.

Fact - As of Feb. 1865 - 1,150 black seamen served in the Confederate Navy. One of these was among the last Confederates to surrender, aboard the CSS Shenandoah, six months after the war ended. This surrender took place in England.

Fact - On April 4, 1865 (Amelia County, VA), a Confederate supply train was exclusively manned and guarded by black Infantry. When attacked by Federal Cavalry, they stood their ground and fought off the charge, but on the second charge they were overwhelmed. These soldiers are believed to be from "Major Turner's" Confederate command.
Fact - During the early 1900's, many members of the United Confederate Veterans (UCV) advocated awarding former slaves rural acreage and a home. There was hope that justice could be given those slaves that were once promised forty acres and a mule but never received any. In the 1913 Confederate Veteran magazine published by the UCV, it was printed that this plan If not Democratic, it is the Confederate thing to do. There was much gratitude toward former slaves, which thousands were loyal, to the last degree, now living with total poverty of the big cities. Unfortunately, their proposal fell on deaf ears on Capitol Hill.

Fact - Union General U.S. Grant in Feb 1865, ordered the capture of all the Negro men before the enemy can put them in their ranks. Frederick Douglas warned Lincoln that unless slaves were guaranteed freedom (those in Union controlled areas were still slaves) and land bounties, they would take up arms for the rebels.

Fact - The Jackson Battalion included two companies of black soldiers. They saw combat at Petersburg under Col. Shipp. "My men acted with utmost promptness and goodwill...Allow me to state sir that they behaved in an extraordinary acceptable manner."

Fact - A Black Confederate, George _____, when captured by Federals was bribed to desert to the other side. He defiantly spoke, "Sir, you want me to desert, and I ain't no deserter. Down South, deserters disgrace their families and I am never going to do that."

Fact - A quota was set for 300,000 black soldiers for the Confederate States Colored Troops. 83% of Richmond's male slave population volunteered for duty. A special ball was held in Richmond to raise money for uniforms for these men. Before Richmond fell, black Confederates in gray uniforms drilled in the streets. Due to the war ending, it is believed only companies or squads of these troops ever saw any action. Many more black soldiers fought for the North, but that difference was simply a difference because the North instituted this progressive policy more soon than the more conservative South. Black soldiers from both sides received discrimination from whites that opposed the concept.

Fact - The "Richmond Howitzers" were partially manned by black militiamen. They saw action at 1st Manassas (or 1st Battle of Bull Run) where they operated battery no. 2. In addition two black regiments, one free and one slave, participated in the battle on behalf of the South. Many colored people were killed in the action, recorded John Parker, a former slave.

Fact - Recently the National Park Service, with a recent discovery, recognized that blacks were asked to help defend the city of Petersburg, Virginia and were offered their freedom if they did so. Regardless of their official classification, black Americans performed support functions that in today's army many would be classified as official military service. The successes of white Confederate troops in battle, could only have been achieved with the support these loyal black Southerners.

Fact - The first military monument in the US Capitol that honors an African-American soldier is the Confederate monument at Arlington National cemetery.

Fact - Dr. Lewis Steiner, Chief Inspector of the United States Sanitary Commission while observing Gen. "Stonewall" Jackson's occupation of Frederick, Maryland, in 1862: "Over 3,000 Negroes must be included in this number [Confederate troops]. These were clad in all kinds of uniforms, not only in cast-off or captured United States uniforms, but in coats with Southern buttons, State buttons, etc. These were shabby, but not shabbier or seedier than those worn by white men in the rebel ranks. Most of the Negroes had arms, rifles, muskets, sabers, bowie-knives, dirks, etc., and were manifestly an integral portion of the Southern Confederate Army."

...............and there you have it.

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THE HELP DESK
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Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom?? 
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

Folks, this is YOUR place to ask questions... 
please feel free to use it...  send them to
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

FROM:  Wmdperkins

I am interested in communicating with anyone who might have access to data for the following two individuals.

Francis RUGGLES joined the Louissiana (New Orleans) Washington Artillery (yes, I know that you haad to pay and submit an application to become a member) before the start of hostilities.  He was working in New Orleans, born and raised in Massachusetts.  He was mortally wounded working his gun on Marye's Heights, Battle of Fredricksburg.

Lt. Col., USA-Brig Gen, CSA Daniel RUGGLES, b Barre, Mass., Grad USMA 1833, resigned comission in winter of '61.  Commanded 1st Div, Braggs Corps, Shiloh.  Most of his troops were Louisianan.

I am interested in any information on either of these individuals (mine is fairly extensive but not complete.)  I am especially interested in corresponding with any reenactor(s)/SCV Units which might be interested.

Daniel RUGGLES is a gg distant Uncle.  I am still trying to fit Francis RUGGLES into my Genealogical tree but he too is not directly related.  I have just become engrossed  in the events of their lives and the similarities to their gg uncle, my ancestor, Brig Gen Timothy RUGGLES, highest ranking American born Colonial Officer.

I look forward to hearing from some of you.

Bill PERKINS

I too am a Yankee by birth, Southerner by choice.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

NOTE:  I'm going to leave this in here another week.

From:  Phreyor@aol.com

Dear friends: I have an inquiry about a GGG.Grandfather Seth H. Davis. According to his discharge papers, He was a private in Company E, 11th Regiment of the Kentucky Infantry. But I can not find any other records or history on him. Does anyone know anything about this boarder state unit?  Thanks for any help! Phreyor.
 P.S. I love this site and have been learning so much from it over the last three years. Keep up the great work! 

Ok folks......   let's see what we can do for Phreyor... 

Answer from IllinoisCW..... 
Was this the Federal unit or the Confederate unit?  Go to google, type in 11th Kentucky Regiment and all sorts of web sites appear.  Most, I believe, were USA 

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Weekly Web Sites we've received
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If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

From:   Bitsobluengray@aol.com

http://world.std.com/~ata/drbiblo.htm
Civil War Fashion Bibliography

Welcome to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, Frederick, MD
http://www.civilwarmed.org/
ShoeString Genealogy
While this isn't Civil War, it IS a great Genealogy Website for those of us who don't have mega-bucks to spend on our genealogy research. 
http://hometown.aol.com/daepowell/myhomepage/ssg1.htm

This site is just a fun site....   see how much you remember from your Geography class.   We had a blank map just like it and had to learn all the states...... What fun!!!
http://www.madblast.com/funflash/swf/map_test.swf

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From:  MDelPa

Pennsylvania Civil War Soldiers - Bates - Free Pennsylvania Genealogy
http://www.pacivilwar.com/bates.html


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From: DaePowell

Military Records Online Searchable Military Indexes & Databases
(worth repeating)
http://home.att.net/~wee-monster/military.html

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From:  HUGH W36

Newbies' Guide to Genealogy & Family History. by ROY STOCKDILL
www.genuki.org.uk/gs/Newbie.html 

The Library of Congress has over 1,000 photographs of the Civil War in its American Memory collection. It includes a search engine
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/cwphtml/cwphome.html
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From Kevin Frye
Andersonville Revisited
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/Marchevents.html

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FROM OUR READERS
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From:  Barb
(received this from Barb in reference to the story about Sallie)

Sallie should have been awarded a Medal of Honor.  What a touching story.  (reaching for Kleenex)

((((((((Barb)))))))))  Again thanks so much for the feedback....  <GRIN>

If your ancestor has a story to tell, please send it to us. 
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
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NEW!!!!!  GoldHobo@aol.com has told us if anyone wants info the the 85th NY Inf. Regt. (Plymouth Pilgrims) you may email her.  She has a book about them.    Her one request is that you put 85th Regt. in the subject line so she doesn't delete it by mistake

JLawson656@aol.com
has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email.

GandMS@aol.com  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you.

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin/frye@gnat.net  does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com  Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

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"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
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If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html

March  13 - 14 Georgia
  Andersonville Revisited.   This unique living history program offers visitors the opportunity to see and experience what life was like at the infamous Civil War prison camp.  For more information about the daily activities you can go to:  http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/Marchevents.html or you can call 229-924-0343 or email frye@gnat.net

Be sure to check out the information regarding Candle Lantern Tours... Reservations are required.

March  13 - 14 North Carolina  Living history and reenactment, commemoration of the anniversary of the Battle of Averasboro near Dunn. More info, 910-891-5019 or www.averasboroactivities.com

March  20 - 21  Virginia   Reenactment, living history, encampments, lectures, kids' activities and battles each afternoon at Endview Plantation in Newport News. 10 am-4 pm. $7. 757-887-1862 or www.endview.org
March 27-28 Virginia   Living history weekend at Five Forks, part of the Petersburg National Battlefield west of Petersburg. Demonstrations, ranger programs and more. Free. 804-732-6092 or www.nps.gov/pete

April 3 - 4  Virginia  Living history, anniversary encampment at the Sailor's Creek Battlefield Historic State Park near Farmville. Demonstrations, special talks, Hillsman House open. Free. More information: 434-392-3435 or www.dcr.state.va.us.

April 12 - 17  South Carolina Special events in Charleston surrounding the burial of the crew of the CSS Hunley, the Confederate submarine recovered in 2000. Events include living history, lectures, musical performances, artillery demonstrations, presentation of facial reconstructions of the Hunley crew and programs at the site of the conservation of the submarine. Funeral-related events include visitations, laying in state and the April 17 burial at Magnolia Cemetery. Large crowds are expected. For current list of events and times, see www.hunley.org

April  24  Maryland  Special program, "Music of the Civil War," performances and discussion of the life and duties of Civil War musicians at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. 11 am-3 pm. Free with admission. 301-695-1864 or www.civilwarmed.org

>April 30 - May 2 Virginia  Battle of the Wilderness, 140th anniversary activities. Ellwood open 11 am-4:30 pm Friday and 11 am-5 pm during weekend. National Park plans activities. Check www.nps.gov/frsp for the latest information.

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Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
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Time:  
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

March 11 & 12, 2004 -Here it is!!!!  Our special Songs letters and poems nights.  If you would like to share something sent from your ancestor during the war, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

March 18 & 19, 2004 - OPEN CHAT

March 25 & 26, 2004 - COASTAL WAR originally done by Kathy Dhalle

April 1 & 2, 2004  -  OPEN CHAT

April 8 & 9, 2004  -  Our special Songs letters and poems nights.  If you would like to share something sent from your ancestor during the war, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night. 

Bill and Jayne  :-)

Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 14 March 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line.  

NOTE from Jayne:  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had recently.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter.

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NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
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Thursday and Friday were Songs, Letters and Poems nights.  We even shared some recipes of the Civil War period.  :D   Next week is OPEN CHAT  Join us with your Civil War stories and/or questions.  I had a suggestion from one of the chatters that one night we talk about the homefront during the Civil War.  We will set up a date for this and get it on the schedule.  If you have other ideas, by all means let us know!!!!   

Before I go any further, I want to wish my partner, ok my former partner, Jimmy and his "honey", as he affectionately called her, a VERY Happy Anniversary with even more wishes for many more years together!!!  

As I was skimming thru some of the old issues of the Weekly Fireside, I found a poem written by one of our youngest attendees who joined the chat.  Her name is Jenny, from MS.  She was in her early teens when she use to join us.  I thought I'd share the poem with you all.  

A tribute to the GFS's
written by MBram10513

You all are very patient.
You all understand.
Your hearts are warm and caring.
You have room for everyone.
Sometimes you are serious,
but cut loose at times.
You have answers to our questions.
You have wisdom so we listen.
I guess thats why ya'll are my best friends.

Jenny....  if you're out there somewhere, Hi from the folks in the American Civil War History chatroom and let us know how you're doing

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I'm leaving this in for another week.  We'd like to have some feed back if you are interested in any of the follow.  Steve and Tom are both interested to see if folks would be interested in tours...   Steve with a group to Ft. Delaware perhaps, and Tom with a group to Gettysburg.   And don't forget, too, IllinoisCW has offered to do a tour of some of the western battlefields.  They asked to put out some feelers to see if there would be any interest.  Send me an email with your thoughts about it and where'd you like to go.  Tom has said he'll be available any weekend except the first week in July.   

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
MUSIC
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you have some favorite music, tell us a little about it and we'll put it here in the newsletter.

Several weeks ago Jim told us about Eva Cassidy and as I told you the next week that I went and bought the "Songbird" album he suggested.  Well.....   I've become addicted to her music...   I then told you all about Josh Groban's "You Raise Me Up" and received the following.  :)  

From:  RHilands@aol.com

You can buy the DVD or CD Or VHS of Josh Groban.  The DVD I have is his Concert that has been on PBS several times along with his 1st CD album.  His newest album is "Closer."  

I have been a fan since I first caught him on "Good Morning America" when he was 19 years old. He is now 23.

If you have lost a loved one, you need to hear his "To Where You Are."  He is coming to Connecticut for a concert on April 7th.  I tried to get  tickets back in November & he is sold out.

My son had never heard of him but tried to get me tickets and he came back to me and said, "hey Dad, this guy must be good." I said why and he said I can get you tickets but they are $200.00 each.  

FYI after reading from you about Eva Cassidy, I went and bought 2 of her albums. You are correct.

Go get Josh albums. You won't regret it.
Cheers,

Note from Jayne:   At Bob's suggestion I went and bought Josh's new CD called "Closer" and he's right....  I don't regret it!!   The DVD/CD will have to wait awhile.

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.  

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to.  

Also on Thursday 8-9PM ET: Trace Your Civil War Ancestors in Ancestral Digs. (on AOL only) Join HOST FMLY Wolfrd and HOST FMLY Heathr to discuss ancestral searches from the Civil War period

You can visit the other Genealogy chats by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at   Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
"THE BOOK SHELF"
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.   

* * * * * * * * * * 

http://www.roberteleecwrt.org/reviews.html 
http://www.cwbr.com/ 

Check out some book reviews at the above websites.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs, 
and Poems evenings)
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

WILLIAM BLACK 
Co, B - 55th Illinois 

This sure ain’t what I thought 
Bein’ a soldier was gonna be. 
Sure I knew there’d be lots a marchin’ 
But I’d followed the plow for years. 
I even knew the food wouldn’t be the best, 
But ma had died when I was just ten. 
Sleepin’ in tents wouldn’t be too bad 
As long as there were blankets to keep me warm. 
I knew there’d be shootin’ and killin’. 
Shootin’ and killin’ - 
That’s what a soldier’s s’posed to do. 
I was prepared for death 
To be at my stoop any time. 
But I sure didn’t think, 
Back in Chicago when I joined up, 
That I’d ever be told, by my own Colonel, 
To kill one of our own men 
Simply because he went home 
To be with his wife 
When she buried their baby boy. 

by Frank Crawford

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
DID YOU KNOW?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

     During the Civil War, including the times before and after, it was legal and socially acceptable for a man to beat his wife, provided that the instrument used in the beating was no thicker that his thumb? Thus we get the term: Rule of thumb.

     When a woman mourned for her husband in the 1860's, she spent a minimum of two-and-a-half years in mourning? That meant little or no social activities: no parties, no outings, no visitors, and a wardrobe that consisted of nothing but black. The husband, when mourning for his wife, however, spent three months in a black suit.

       After the Battle of Gettysburg. the discarded rifles were collected and sent to Washington to be inspected and reissued? Of the 37,574 rifles recovered, 24,000were still loaded; 6,000 had one round in the barrel; 12,000 had two rounds in the barrel; 6,000 had three to ten rounds in the barrel. Onr rifle, the most remarkable of all, had been stuffed to the top with twenty-three rounds in the barrel.

source:  http://www.22mass.com/strange.html 

...............and there you have it.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
THE HELP DESK
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom??  
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if 
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

Folks, this is YOUR place to ask questions...  
please feel free to use it...  send them to
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I'm going to leave the following in for another week.

FROM:  Wmdperkins

I am interested in communicating with anyone who might have access to data for the following two individuals.

Francis RUGGLES joined the Louissiana (New Orleans) Washington Artillery (yes, I know that you haad to pay and submit an application to become a member) before the start of hostilities.  He was working in New Orleans, born and raised in Massachusetts.  He was mortally wounded working his gun on Marye's Heights, Battle of Fredricksburg.

Lt. Col., USA-Brig Gen, CSA Daniel RUGGLES, b Barre, Mass., Grad USMA 1833, resigned comission in winter of '61.  Commanded 1st Div, Braggs Corps, Shiloh.  Most of his troops were Louisianan.

I am interested in any information on either of these individuals (mine is fairly extensive but not complete.)  I am especially interested in corresponding with any reenactor(s)/SCV Units which might be interested.

Daniel RUGGLES is a gg distant Uncle.  I am still trying to fit Francis RUGGLES into my Genealogical tree but he too is not directly related.  I have just become engrossed  in the events of their lives and the similarities to their gg uncle, my ancestor, Brig Gen Timothy RUGGLES, highest ranking American born Colonial Officer.

I look forward to hearing from some of you.

Bill PERKINS

I too am a Yankee by birth, Southerner by choice.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Weekly Web Sites we've received 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

From:   Bitsobluengray@aol.com

THE STONE PRAIRIE HOME GUARD
http://freepages.history.rootsweb.com/~cappscreek/sphgmain.html 

eHistory which has timeline events, battle outlines, biography and thousands of images and maps
http://www.ehistory.com/ 

The Generals' Burials Listing 
http://www.cwc.lsu.edu/cwc/projects/dbases/generals.htm 
The list of Civil War Generals is taken from Generals in Blue and Generals in Gray. West Point year, date of birth, date of death, cemetery, city and state are listed for each general.

Cemetery Index - US Civil War Center
http://www.cwc.lsu.edu/cwc/projects/cemindex.htm 
you can search burials at the following cemeteries
Barrancas National Cemetery (FL)
Bay Pines Cemetery (FL)
Camp Butler National Cemetery (IL)
Camp Chase National Cemetery (OH)
Chalmette National Cemetery  (LA)
Chattanooga National Cemetery (TN)
City Point National Cemetery (VA)
Cold Harbor National Cemetery  (VA)
Confederate Stockade Cemetery at Johnson's Island (OH)
Cornett Cemetery, Cass County (TX)
Cypress Hills (NY)
Danville National Cemetery  (KY)
Fairhaven Memorial Park and Mortuary (CA)
Fayetteville National Cemetery (AR)
Finn's Point (NJ)
Fort Harrison National Cemetery (VA)
Fort Snelling National Cemetery (MN)
Glendale National Cemetery (VA)
Grafton National Cemetery (WV)
Lexington National Cemetery  (KY)
Mill Springs National Cemetery  (KY)
Mobile National Cemetery  (AL)
Mount Olivet Cemetery (LA) (currently incomplete)
Philadelphia National Cemetery (PA)
Richmond National Cemetery (VA)
Santa Ana National Cemetery (CA)
Seven Pines National Cemetery (VA)
St. Augustine National Cemetery (FL)
Union Mound Cemetery (MD)

Old Disease Names and Modern Definitions
http://www3.nb.sympatico.ca/pebbles2/tools.html#disease 
http://www.monmouth.com/~sorourke/disease.htm 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
FROM OUR READERS
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

I received the following from An Madra Rua

Civil War Ladies and Gentlemen's Conference 
March 6,7,8 2004

This was the first of these conferences which I had attended. Let me say up front that I was very impressed. It was not cheap to attend, the price was $230.00 per person, but I feel that I got my money's worth. I will definitely be attending the 2005 conference!
The conference was held in Harrisburg, PA and focused primarily on Civilian Life before, during and after the War. It opened on Friday with a series of workshops, which convered everything from how to properly tie a cravat, to the intricacies of the waltz, and polka, to the labor of doing your laundry without our modern machinery! On Saturday, there were two "tracks" of lectures: the first, Program A, dealt with women's clothing, CW era weddings, and the experiences of two nurses, one Southern and one Northern. Program B was of interest to the gentlemen, featuring lectures on Material Culture (what kind of "stuff" did they really have in the their homes), hat making and felting processes, transportation, News of the day (what was happening elsewhere in the world), men's working class clothing and immigration.
All of the lectures that I attended were excellent. The speakers were well prepared, good speakers and made good usage of visual aids. Each person attending the conference received a binder filled with a set of "chapters", one on each lecture in the track that he or she decided to attend.  One of these chapters included a very extensive booklist, which will aid me in further research.
             There were several clothing displays of original garments during the weekend. The Aurora collection (men's garments) was on display all weekend. In the main ballroom/lecture hall, there were three different displays, one each on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Participants were allowed to examine (but not touch) and photograph dozens of original dresses, shoes, bonnets and other items. Considering that a good book on historic costume usually runs about $75 dollars, this was a terrific opportunity!
A definite thumbs up for this conference! Keep an eye on their website for next year's conference and all of their classes for this year.  http://genteelarts.com/#2001%20SEMINAR%20SCHEDULE   

(((((((Rua)))))))  Thanks a whole bunch!!   Sounds like it was a great conference!

If your ancestor has or you have a story to tell, please send it to us.  
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

NEW!!!!!   GoldHobo@aol.com has told us if anyone wants info the the 85th NY Inf. Regt. (Plymouth Pilgrims) you may email her.  She has a book about them.    Her one request is that you put 85th Regt. in the subject line so she doesn't delete it by mistake

JLawson656@aol.com has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email. 

GandMS@aol.com  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you. 

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin/frye@gnat.net  does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html 

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com  Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html


March  20 - 21  Virginia   Reenactment, living history, encampments, lectures, kids' activities and battles each afternoon at Endview Plantation in Newport News. 10 am-4 pm. $7. 757-887-1862 or www.endview.org 

March 27-28 Virginia   Living history weekend at Five Forks, part of the Petersburg National Battlefield west of Petersburg. Demonstrations, ranger programs and more. Free. 804-732-6092 or www.nps.gov/pete 

April 3 - 4  Virginia  Living history, anniversary encampment at the Sailor's Creek Battlefield Historic State Park near Farmville. Demonstrations, special talks, Hillsman House open. Free. More information: 434-392-3435 or www.dcr.state.va.us. 

April 12 - 17  South Carolina Special events in Charleston surrounding the burial of the crew of the CSS Hunley, the Confederate submarine recovered in 2000. Events include living history, lectures, musical performances, artillery demonstrations, presentation of facial reconstructions of the Hunley crew and programs at the site of the conservation of the submarine. Funeral-related events include visitations, laying in state and the April 17 burial at Magnolia Cemetery. Large crowds are expected. For current list of events and times, see www.hunley.org 

April  24  Maryland  Special program, "Music of the Civil War," performances and discussion of the life and duties of Civil War musicians at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. 11 am-3 pm. Free with admission. 301-695-1864 or www.civilwarmed.org 

April 24 - 25  Pennsylvania  Neshaminy Park Civil War Reenactment 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.  215-639-4538  For more information email neshaminysp@state.pa.us or contact: Russ Manning 215-920-2321 archducrj1@aol.com
Activities are open to the public Saturday and Sunday. In addition to the daily `Battles` there will be a host of Civil War programs throughout the day. 

April 30 - May 2 Virginia  Battle of the Wilderness, 140th anniversary activities. Ellwood open 11 am-4:30 pm Friday and 11 am-5 pm during weekend. National Park plans activities. Check www.nps.gov/frsp for the latest information. 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

Time:   
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

March 18 & 19, 2004 - OPEN CHAT

March 25 & 26, 2004 - COASTAL WAR originally done by Kathy Dhalle 

April 1 & 2, 2004  -  OPEN CHAT

April 8 & 9, 2004  -  Our special Songs letters and poems nights.  If you would like to share something sent from your ancestor during the war, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

April 15 & 16, 2004 - OPEN CHAT

April 22 & 23, 2004 - To be announced

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night.  

Bill and Jayne  :-)


Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 21 March 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line.  

NOTE from Jayne:  We're getting more subscribers all the time, and  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had recently.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

What great open chats we had this week!!!   We were able to find some ancestors for several people and found they had pension records too!!!   Our Friday chat runs from 10 PM ET till midnight ET but we were having so much fun we never closed the room till almost 1 AM ET.  Next week we'll tell the  COASTAL WAR story originally told by Kathy Dhalle   

* * * * * * * * * 

Apparently no one is interested in any tours, since I only heard from one person, so I've removed the "query" from the newsletter.   :(     

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
MUSIC
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you have some favorite music, tell us a little about it and we'll put it here in the newsletter.

Last week RHilands told me the title of Josh Groban's newest album  "Closer" well I went out and bought it.  The who album is wonderful, and the song "You Raise Me Up" is indeed on the album.  Part of the song lyrics are:

"You raise me up so I can stand on mountains
You raise me up to walk on stormy seas
I am strong when I am on your shoulders
You raise me up to more than I can be."

These words are extremely moving and comforting to me at times when things just aren't quite going the way "I" think they should be.  Next time you have a "bad" moment....  "listen" to those words.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.  

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to.  

Also on Thursday 8-9PM ET: Trace Your Civil War Ancestors in Ancestral Digs. (on AOL only) Join HOST FMLY Wolfrd and HOST FMLY Heathr to discuss ancestral searches from the Civil War period

You can visit the other Genealogy chats by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at   Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
"THE BOOK SHELF"
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.   

* * * * * * * * * * 

http://www.roberteleecwrt.org/reviews.html 
http://www.cwbr.com/ 

Check out some book reviews at the above websites.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs, 
and Poems evenings)
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

Ragged Old Flag by Johnny Cash 

I walked through a county courthouse square, 
On a park bench an old man was sitting there. 
I said, "Your old courthouse is kinda run down." 
He said, "Naw, it'll do for our little town." 
I said, "Your flagpole has leaned a little bit, 
And that's a Ragged Old Flag you got hanging on it. 
He said, "Have a seat", and I sat down. 
"Is this the first time you've been to our little town?" 
I said, "I think it is." He said, "I don't like to brag, 
But we're kinda proud of that Ragged Old Flag." 
"You see, we got a little hole in that flag there 
When Washington took it across the Delaware. 
And it got powder-burned the night Francis Scott Key 
Sat watching it writing _Oh Say Can You See_. 
And it got a bad rip in New Orleans 
With Packingham and Jackson tuggin' at its seams." 
"And it almost fell at the Alamo "
Beside the Texas flag, but she waved on through. 
She got cut with a sword at Chancellorsville 
And she got cut again at Shiloh Hill. 
There was Robert E. Lee, Beauregard, and Bragg, 
And the south wind blew hard on that Ragged Old Flag." 

"On Flanders Field in World War I She got a big hole from a Bertha gun. 
She turned blood red in World War II 
She hung limp and low by the time it was through. 
She was in Korea and Vietnam. 
She went where she was sent by her Uncle Sam." 

"She waved from our ships upon the briny foam, 
And now they've about quit waving her back here at home. 
In her own good land she's been abused -- 
She's been burned, dishonored, denied and refused." 

"And the government for which she stands 
Is scandalized throughout the land. 
And she's getting threadbare and wearing thin, 
But she's in good shape for the shape she's in. 
Cause she's been through the fire before 
And I believe she can take a whole lot more." 
"So we raise her up every morning, take her down every night. 
We don't let her touch the ground And we fold her up right. 
On second thought I DO like to brag, 
"Cause I'm mighty proud of that Ragged Old Flag." 

~ Johnny Cash ~ 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
DID YOU KNOW?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

 The following was sent to us by Ted Fisher

John Brown's Body

No figure created more havoc prior to the Civil War than John Brown. By the middle of the 1850's, this fifty six year old abolitionist believed whole- heartedly in the Old Testament cry; an eye for an eye. 

Brown looked the part of a biblical warrior, with a long beard and mesmerizing stare that paniced his enemies- namely slavery supporters. This father of 20 children had enjoyed limited success as a farmer and businessman throughout his lifetime. By 1855, he teamed with several of his sons and relatives to avenge pillaging and coercion, which pro-slavery guerillas had allegedly committed against unresisting settlers. "Bleeding Kansas" was embroiled in a bitter fight between "free-soiler" settlers who wanted a state without slave labor and pro-slavery rivals who saw Kansas as an extension of the South.

"We must fight fire with fire," Brown told his henchman, "We must strike fear in the hearts of the pro-slavery people. Something must be done to show those barbarians that we, too have rights." Brown believed a "radical , retaliatory measure" against the "slave hounds" of his own neighborhood near Pottawatomie Creek would send a clear message. Brown kidnapped five pro-slavery settlers from their cabins and calmly split open their skulls with broadswords. News spread of the massacre and, while authorities tried to quell the violence and bring justice to evils committed on both sides, the bushwacking raids continued to escalate. When news traveled east, partisan newspapers ran stories that favored their point of view with Republican papers seizing on pro-slavery "barbarism" while the Southern and Democratic press focused on Brown's unforgiving crusade.

For the next few years, Brown's activities became more hidden from public view. Brown became fascinated with the tactics of guerrilla warfare and its ability to seize and paralyze larger forces. Brown craved to bring on war, especially into the Appalachian foothills of Virginia. "Without the shedding of blood there is no remission of sin," Brown said, quoting the Bible. "Talk, talk, talk!" Brown yelled at an anti-slavery meeting, "That will never free the slaves."

What Brown needed, though, was an army and few were willing to risk everything for Brown's holy war.Brown even contacted his old friend, the well-respected African-American abolitionist Frederick Douglass in 1859. Meeting in an old quarry outside Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, Brown urged Douglass to join him on a raid against the federal armory and arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia. "Come with me, Douglass," Brown told him, "When I strike, the bees will begin to swarm, and I shall want you to help hive them." But Douglass refused, feeling that "Harpers Ferry was a perfect steel trap."

Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry in mid-October 1859 was botched from the outset wnen Brown and his accomplices were trapped and eventually captured. Brown was sentenced to death by hanging on December 2, 1859, but he left prophetic words before dying.

"All you people of the South prepare yourselves for a settlement of that question....The sooner you are prepared the better. You may dispose of me very easily; I am nearly disposed of now, but this question is still to be settled- this Negro question I mean- the end of that is not yet."

There to witness Brown's hanging was an apprentice actor named John Wilkes Booth, who never forgot Brown's courage or the old man's bold gamble at changing the course of history with horrible acts.

Source: Civil War Preservation Trust 2003 Calendar by Chris Heisey

...............and there you have it.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
THE HELP DESK
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom??  
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if 
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

Folks, this is YOUR place to ask questions...  
please feel free to use it...  send them to
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I received the following from Alf B Hill@AOL.com  They appeared on one of the maillists he belongs to and he thought maybe the faithful might be able to help.  If you have any answer to either of the queries, send them to Alf and he can post them on the Maillist.  

#1   
Does anyone on the list have or have knowledge of any photos taken of the Washington Co. members of Company D., 79th PA?  I have never seen a picture of my g,grandfather William Barringer who was a member of Co. D, 79th PA Cavalry.  His two brothers, John and George were foot soldiers of Co. D, 79th PA.  I have a newspaper clipping of John at a GAR meeting; however, I was hoping that there might be a group photo somewhere that might include William.

Incidentally, all three Barringer brothers survived the Civil War as did the three Worrell brothers, Nathaniel, Hiram and William H. What were the chances of that happening in such a devastating conflict.?.

Thank you,
Marilyn of Lake Co., IL

#2 
I have been searching for a picture of the 140th PA infantry during the civil war. I have one individual picture of Cephas Dodd Sharp. He and 3 of his brothers all served in the 140th. William Woolverton Sharp was a Surgeon, Manean and Isaac were both Sgt.s  Cephas is the only one that did not make it home. He was killed at Gettsburg along with his sister's husband, James Alexander Bebout. I would give anything to find a picture of these mentioned,  all gguncles of my father, Homer Littleton Sharp who died in 1948. A wonderful cousin sent me the picture of Cephas Dodd Sharp in his uniform. I have found no others. Ira Sharp Dennis

The 140th Pa infantry during the Civil War was one of most distinguished regiments in the Union army and included five companies from Washinton County. From the history of Washington County, PA...Beers

Put on your thinking caps and let's see if we can help either of these two people out.  

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Wmdperkins  is still looking for info re  Francis Ruggles of the Louisiana (New Orleans) Washington Artillery) and Lt. Col., USA-Brig Gen, CSA Daniel RUGGLES, 1st Div, Braggs Corps.

--------
In answer to the above, MM3C11259 sent this:

Ran across the above persons name touring Shiloh battlefield. Ruggles commanded the confederate artillery which finally dislodged the federals from the Hornet's Nest. Suggest you look up info on Shiloh, Hornets Nest, and Ruggles

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Weekly Web Sites we've received 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

From:   Bitsobluengray@aol.com

Life Stories of Civil War Heroes
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Aegean/6732/look.html 

Participants in the Battle of Seven Pines, Henrico County, VA
May 31 - June 1, 1862
http://www.thepastwhispers.com/Seven_Pines_participants

Civil War Prison Camps
http://www.imagin.net/~tracers/civil_war_prison_camps.htm 

This website has info about numerous prisons
http://dmoz.org/Society/History/United_States/Wars/Civil_War/Prisons/ 

Alton, Illinois - Confederate Prison
http://www.altonweb.com/history/civilwar/confed/index.html 

Prisoners in Alton Prison
http://www.altonweb.com/history/civilwar/confed/#search 
North Alton Confederate Cemetery

Burials at Camp Butler National Cem
http://www.interment.net/data/us/il/sangamon/campbutler/index.htm 

Camp Chase
http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/Quarters/5109/ 

Elmira Prison
Burials in Woodlawn from Elmira Prison
http://www.rootsweb.com/~nychemun/prison.htm 

Point Lookout - info about the prison 
http://mars.spaceports.com/~court52/lookoutn.htm 

Conf. POW's Who Died at Rock Island, IL
http://pw1.netcom.com/~jeansmal/rockislpow.html#lists 

~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Cyndis List of new websites

URL:     http://www.civil-war-museum.org 
TITLE:     civil war museum of the western theater
DESCRIPTION:     over 1000 original civil war artifacts including more than 
15 generals and their personal aftifacts.

=~=~=~=

From:   High W36

If you'd like to read some info re the importance of Trains in the Civil War
http://www.southernmuseum.org/exhibits.html
http://www.southernmuseum.org/index.html

--------------
Family Civil War Letters
http://hattonexley.homestead.com/CivilWar.html  

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
FROM OUR READERS
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

If your ancestor has or you have a story to tell, please send it to us.  
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

NEW!!!!!   GoldHobo@aol.com has told us if anyone wants info the the 85th NY Inf. Regt. (Plymouth Pilgrims) you may email her.  She has a book about them.    Her one request is that you put 85th Regt. in the subject line so she doesn't delete it by mistake

JLawson656@aol.com has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email. 

GandMS@aol.com  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you. 

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin/frye@gnat.net  does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html 

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com  Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html

March 27-28 Virginia   Living history weekend at Five Forks, part of the Petersburg National Battlefield west of Petersburg. Demonstrations, ranger programs and more. Free. 804-732-6092 or www.nps.gov/pete 

April 3 - 4  Virginia  Living history, anniversary encampment at the Sailor's Creek Battlefield Historic State Park near Farmville. Demonstrations, special talks, Hillsman House open. Free. More information: 434-392-3435 or www.dcr.state.va.us. 

April 12 - 17  South Carolina Special events in Charleston surrounding the burial of the crew of the CSS Hunley, the Confederate submarine recovered in 2000. Events include living history, lectures, musical performances, artillery demonstrations, presentation of facial reconstructions of the Hunley crew and programs at the site of the conservation of the submarine. Funeral-related events include visitations, laying in state and the April 17 burial at Magnolia Cemetery. Large crowds are expected. For current list of events and times, see www.hunley.org 

April  24  Maryland  Special program, "Music of the Civil War," performances and discussion of the life and duties of Civil War musicians at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. 11 am-3 pm. Free with admission. 301-695-1864 or www.civilwarmed.org 

April 24 - 25  Pennsylvania  Neshaminy Park Civil War Reenactment 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.  215-639-4538  For more information email neshaminysp@state.pa.us or contact: Russ Manning 215-920-2321 archducrj1@aol.com
Activities are open to the public Saturday and Sunday. In addition to the daily `Battles` there will be a host of Civil War programs throughout the day. 

April 30 - May 2 Virginia  Battle of the Wilderness, 140th anniversary activities. Ellwood open 11 am-4:30 pm Friday and 11 am-5 pm during weekend. National Park plans activities. Check www.nps.gov/frsp for the latest information. 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

Time:   
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

March 25 & 26, 2004 - COASTAL WAR originally given by Kathy Dhalle 

April 1 & 2, 2004  -  OPEN CHAT

April 8 & 9, 2004  -  Our special Songs letters and poems nights.  If you would like to share something sent from your ancestor during the war, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

April 15 & 16, 2004 - OPEN CHAT

April 22 & 23, 2004 - Since there are five Thursdays and Fridays in the month, I'm going to make this week OPEN CHAT and then have a special program next week.

April 29 & 30, 2004 -  On the Homefront during the Civil War.  How do you suppose your ancestors family made out during the war while their husbands, sons, fathers, brothers were away in the war.  Who took care of the farms?  

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night.  

Bill and Jayne  :-)

Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 28 March 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line. 

NOTE from Jayne:  We're getting more subscribers all the time, and  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had recently.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
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What a great story we had this week!!!   We told the story of the Coastal War which had been originally given by Kathy Dhalle.  Next week we'll have open chat so bring all your questions.  It was good to see some new faces in the chat this week.  Do you have favorite Music.....  have you read a Civil War book???    Let us hear from you. 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
MUSIC
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you have some favorite music, tell us a little about it and we'll put it here in the newsletter.

FROM:  An Madra Rua

Here is the website for Charlie Zahm . He has 15 CD's out and an enormous following of  devoted fans. One of my favorite CD's is  "AMericana" which features songs from both the Revolutionary War and the Civil War

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well. 

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to. 

Also on Thursday 8-9PM ET: Trace Your Civil War Ancestors in Ancestral Digs. (on AOL only) Join HOST FMLY Wolfrd to discuss ancestral searches from the Civil War period

You can visit the other Genealogy chats by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at   Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
"THE BOOK SHELF"
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.  

* * * * * * * * * *

http://www.roberteleecwrt.org/reviews.html
http://www.cwbr.com/

Check out some book reviews at the above websites.

Note from Jayne:  I found this one the CIVIL-WAR-L@rootsweb.com maillist....

The following is an excerpt from "Why I Wrote It," by Louise W. Barker.

"Some little matters were arranged, and shortly after I was on my way to my
old home. How the journey was accomplished, by what means the obstacles in
our way were surmounted, I might, could I speak with definiteness, consider
myself in honor bound to preserve in secrecy. But these things are a
profound mystery to me. After some strange movements, but without any
annoying adventure, I found myself amidst familiar scenes. No, I recall that
phrase. I should never have recognized the once familiar spots, they were so
changed. The country had been ravaged by two armies, wasted by fires and
guerrillas, and scourged as by a sirocco. Twenty-three engagements, of more
or less importance, had taken place within a circuit of twenty miles of the
plantation where my childhood had been passed, and one not two miles
removed. The country with its deserted plantations, its tenantless negro
cabins falling to decay, its fenceless gardens and fields overrun with rank
weeds, all proclaimed some unusual state of affairs. Go where I would I met
no young men, except an occasional soldier on furlough. And the old men were
organized into Home Guards, with their drills and regular military duties.
No young woman or child over six years was found who was not a member of
some military company."

"Why I Wrote It" is by a woman raised in the plantation culture of the old
South who was sent North for school before the war and who returned to
Tennessee during the war.

The full article is located at

http://www.pddoc.com/skedaddle/057a/why_i_wrote_it.htm  

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs,
and Poems evenings)
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

These letters came from a e-group that DaePowell belongs to and he has passed them on to us.  Nothing has been changed, spelling, punctuation, interpretations etc.

Letter from John Thomas Rairdon, 8 May 1863


Letter from John Thomas Rairdon to his brother, James H. Rairdon, sons of
Jefferson Rardon/Rairdon and Fannie Maria Caldwell of Bullitt County,
Kentucky.  Barbara Jerabek photocopied the original letter and sent it and
her transcription to Anette Rardin for a second transcription.  Also see
notes for previous transcriptions.  Permission to post to archives and
elsewhere.  Anette Rardin, March 2004

Franklin Tens
May the 8 1863

Dear        Brother

I will drop you a few lines to let you know I am well and sincerly hope thes
few lines will find you and all the rest of the famly well and harty   I
receved you kind and welcom leter of the first   it came to hand on the 5
I was glad to her you all was well and rety redy to et you a lounc eny  tim
[ready to eat your allowance any time?]

I was sorow to se you had got to rite more than in sid of beter   the first
leter I got from you it was rote beter than the last one I got   you you
must try and do beter for I no you can for you have [page two] Done it be
fore [“you” smudged] you   I got a leter beter rten than the last   you mus
be curfel how you rite not go in sutch a hury

You sed in your leter that philip chappell had got home   I want to know
whether he has got his discharge or not yet and how he is when you rite to
me   we have bin pad off for to monts and fill owed 18 dolers and I paid it
and he sed he would pay fother and I guess he has done paid him be fore now

Jim I expect we will stay her all sum   if we move we will go futher south
for we ar a going to follow the rebels till we Drive them clar in to the
extreme south [page three] if we can and I guess we ar abel to do that

I want you to tell me of he wanted to buy our plase

Our old captain welling has come back to the regament our Second magor the
people ar all done planting corn and some have ploud (therin once?)   rie is
in bloom and wheet is knee high and ots is a bout ankel high   I will close
my bad riten leter by tell ing you to give my Respects to all enquring
frends if eny such be   all of the boys ar all well and harty   rite soon
and often   so nothing more but reman your fathful Brother now and for ever

John T Rairdon   To

James H. Rairdon

When this you se remember me al tho meny miles a part ar we

[page four]  James you mus remember you have once to Die and you must live
preped to go eny tim your god calls on you to go and we all will met in
heven wher we will fast no more
[Tarone Davison?] ses he wants you rite to him   he has rote you once and
has got no ans yet
John T Rardon

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Second letter written by John Thomas Rairdon on 8 May 1863

Letter from John Thomas Rairdon to his parents, Jefferson Rardon/Rairdon and
Fannie M. Caldwell of Bullitt County, Kentucky.  Dow is John’s brother,
Lorenzo Dow Rairdon, who served in Company B, 28th Regiment, Infantry,
Kentucky Volunteers.  Barbara Jerabek photocopied the original letter and
sent it and her transcription to Anette Rardin for a second transcription.
Also see notes for previous transcriptions. Permission to post to archives
and elsewhere.  Anette Rardin, March 2004.

Franklin Ten
May the 8 1863

My Dear
Fother and
Mother

I will try to rite you a line to let you know I am well and engoying all the
blessing heven can be stow on me

I hope thes few lines will find you all well and doing well   I got a leter
from Dow yesterday and he is well and at Clarks ville, Tenese and he ses all
of the boys ar well

I receved your kind and most welcom leter of the first of this month   it
alwas gives grate plesure to her from home

[Page two]  I would druther git a leter from home and red it than to eat
when I am hungry   we still have a litel scurmiching evey now and then   we
do not have as mutch as we did while back   we have had to litel scurmice
sence I rote to you last   we run in to ther comp both times   the frst time
was on the 25 of April   we got in thar a bout day light   we found som of
them a sleep in the comp   in that charge we got a bout a 150 men with some
few ofecers and all ther comp and camp equipege sutch [as?] wagons [page
three] tents and blankets and comasary stores

we burnt evry thing we got and and we also got 50 mules and some few horses
the second was on the 29 of April  we also went in a bout day light but thay
was redy for to reseve us at that time they herd of us a coming and we
fought them a while and they run   we kild 15 or 20 that time and took [20?]
prisners and never a lost a man   we did not loose a man in both of the
charges   I like to charge in to ther camp for it is fun to go as hard as we
can with our sabers arou [around?] to slash and cut as w go

[page four]  we do not have as musch scurmching sence w dashed in to ther
comp for thay have fell back a few miles   we have got a bout 15000 her at
frankling now under cernerl granger   we ar in generl green clay [day?]
Smith and he in unde granger   the 4 and 7 and 6 kentucky [“bergade”
interlined above “4 and 7”] and the 2  mishagen and the 7 penslvany is in
the same trigate brigade

I will close my leter by tell you to rite soon and often   tell of the
childer I want to se them all and you mus know I want to be at home but I
will stay in the army till the war is over if I [keep?] well as I am now
so good by to you all till I rite a gan

John T Rairdon

~~~~~~~~~~~~

And yet another letter written  08 May 1863

Letter from John Thomas Rairdon, 8 May 1863

Letter from John Thomas Rairdon to his brother, James H. Rairdon, sons of
Jefferson Rardon/Rairdon and Fannie Maria Caldwell of Bullitt County,
Kentucky.  Barbara Jerabek photocopied the original letter and sent it and
her transcription to Anette Rardin for a second transcription.  Also see
notes for previous transcriptions.  Permission to post to archives and
elsewhere.  Anette Rardin, March 2004

Franklin Tens
May the 8 1863

Dear        Brother

I will drop you a few lines to let you know I am well and sincerly hope thes
few lines will find you and all the rest of the famly well and harty   I
receved you kind and welcom leter of the first   it came to hand on the 5
I was glad to her you all was well and rety redy to et you a lounc eny  tim
[ready to eat your allowance any time?]

I was sorow to se you had got to rite more than in sid of beter   the first
leter I got from you it was rote beter than the last one I got   you you
must try and do beter for I no you can for you have [page two] Done it be
fore [“you” smudged] you   I got a leter beter rten than the last   you mus
be curfel how you rite not go in sutch a hury

You sed in your leter that philip chappell had got home   I want to know
whether he has got his discharge or not yet and how he is when you rite to
me   we have bin pad off for to monts and fill owed 18 dolers and I paid it
and he sed he would pay fother and I guess he has done paid him be fore now

Jim I expect we will stay her all sum   if we move we will go futher south
for we ar a going to follow the rebels till we Drive them clar in to the
extreme south [page three] if we can and I guess we ar abel to do that

I want you to tell me of he wanted to buy our plase

Our old captain welling has come back to the regament our Second magor the
people ar all done planting corn and some have ploud (therin once?)   rie is
in bloom and wheet is knee high and ots is a bout ankel high   I will close
my bad riten leter by tell ing you to give my Respects to all enquring
frends if eny such be   all of the boys ar all well and harty   rite soon
and often   so nothing more but reman your fathful Brother now and for ever

John T Rairdon   To

James H. Rairdon

When this you se remember me al tho meny miles a part ar we

[page four]  James you mus remember you have once to Die and you must live
preped to go eny tim your god calls on you to go and we all will met in
heven wher we will fast no more
[Tarone Davison?] ses he wants you rite to him   he has rote you once and
has got no ans yet

John T Rardon

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
DID YOU KNOW?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

Did you know that during the Victorian era, the dead were either laid out in their parlors, or, as the Southerners preferred, in their bedrooms? There were no such things as funeral homes; death was a part of life, and the dead remained in the house up until they were buried. The tradition of flowers around the coffin comes from the Victorians trying to hide the scent of rotting flesh.

Did you know that when a child died in the Victorian era, its parents would have a photograph taken of it? They wanted to preserve its memory for as long as possible. A lot of pictures of sleeping children are actually of dead children. Parents would also pose with their deceased little ones in one last family picture.

Did you know that in the centuries before and decades after the Civil War, including the war itself, doorways were wide, not because of the width of women's skirts, but so coffins could be passed through, with a pallbearer on either side?

Source:  http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/3622/strange.html 

...............and there you have it.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
THE HELP DESK
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom?? 
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
question, please let us know.

Folks, this is YOUR place to ask questions... 
please feel free to use it...  send them to
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

While this isn't Civil War, I know many of you are military history buffs and thought maybe you might be able to help Judy. 

From:  CageyCat

I know you do CW but I need a bit of help about the War of 1812.  I know "somewhere" there is a place I could first find his record - where?  Then I write to NARA with one of their specifc forms.  But WHERE do I go first to search for John LANE's record?  Can you help me?  Is there an online searchable database of all 1812?

John Lane moved from Maryland by about Oct 1809 WE THINK (obviously census doesn't give names except HOH & we think he/family lived in father-in-law's home) to WASHINGTON Co PA.

He died Dec 1844 in Washington Co PA.

Unfortunately I have nothing on name except John LANE (Sr.)

There was supposedly one in Biddles (company?).   But there were at least 2 John LANEs in Washington Co PA (two diff townships). 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I received the following from Alf B Hill@AOL.com  They appeared on one of the maillists he belongs to and he thought maybe the faithful might be able to help.  If you have any answer to either of the queries, send them to Alf and he can post them on the Maillist. 

#1  
Does anyone on the list have or have knowledge of any photos taken of the Washington Co. members of Company D., 79th PA?  I have never seen a picture of my g,grandfather William Barringer who was a member of Co. D, 79th PA Cavalry.  His two brothers, John and George were foot soldiers of Co. D, 79th PA.  I have a newspaper clipping of John at a GAR meeting; however, I was hoping that there might be a group photo somewhere that might include William.

Incidentally, all three Barringer brothers survived the Civil War as did the three Worrell brothers, Nathaniel, Hiram and William H. What were the chances of that happening in such a devastating conflict.?.

Thank you,
Marilyn of Lake Co., IL

#2
have been searching for a picture of the 140th PA infantry during the civil war. I have one individual picture of Cephas Dodd Sharp. He and 3 of his brothers all served in the 140th. William Woolverton Sharp was a Surgeon, Manean and Isaac were both Sgt.s  Cephas is the only one that did not make it home. He was killed at Gettsburg along with his sister's husband, James Alexander Bebout. I would give anything to find a picture of these mentioned,  all gguncles of my father, Homer Littleton Sharp who died in 1948. A wonderful cousin sent me the picture of Cephas Dodd Sharp in his uniform. I have found no others. Ira Sharp Dennis

The 140th Pa infantry during the Civil War was one of most distinguished regiments in the Union army and included five companies from Washinton County. From the history of Washington County, PA...Beers Put on your thinking caps and let's see if we can help either of these two people out

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Wmdperkins  is still looking for info re  Francis Ruggles of the Louisiana (New Orleans) Washington Artillery) and Lt. Col., USA-Brig Gen, CSA Daniel RUGGLES, 1st Div, Braggs Corps.

--------
In answer to the above, MM3C11259 sent this:

Ran across the above persons name touring Shiloh battlefield. Ruggles commanded the confederate artillary which finally dislodged the federals from the Hornet's Nest. Suggest you look up info on Shiloh, Hornets Nest, and Ruggles

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Weekly Web Sites we've received
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

From:   Bitsobluengray@aol.com

Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War
http://www.suvcw.org/

From one of the Maillists I belong to: 
How to Arrange Military Medals and Ribbons for Display or Wear
A Official Order of Precedence of military medals and ribbons is available: Please travel to URL: http://members.aol.com/warlibrary/display

~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Cyndislist

Cyndi's Societies and Groups - Fraternal Organizations page. Many new links
http://www.cyndislist.com/soc-frat.htm
This page is chock full of links to resources about Free Masons,
Odd Fellows, the Grand Army of the Republic (Union Civil War
veterans), Knights of Columbus, Eastern Star, Rebekahs, friendly
societies, various abstinence organizations and many other
fraternal groups our ancestors may have belonged to.

~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Kevin Frye

Kevin sent me a story re "Honoring a fallen son:  Confederate seaman died in sub  140 years ago"
by The Frederick News-Post Staff

http://www.fredericknewspost.com/   You have to register on the site to see the online story in their archives but it doesn't appear to cost anything.....  

On the other hand, if you'd rather not register, send and email to CWWeeklyFirside@aol.com a type in the subject line  "The Hunley story" and I will send it to you.

~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: WmMartin1

Save the site of the Battle of Fayetteville and the Battlefield Cemetery
 http://www.petitiononline.com/faybat04/petition.html

~~~~~~~~~~~~
From:   Hugh W36

Hugh asked if I knew the story of the great locomotive chase and sent the following sites. 

http://ngeorgia.com/history/raiders.html
http://www.antioch-college.edu/antiochiana/MarionRoss.htm
http://www.southernmuseum.org/exhibits.html#train

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
FROM OUR READERS
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

If your ancestor has or you have a story to tell, please send it to us. 
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

From Pinkpj622

Dear Bill and Jayne:
thank you for the fireside letter.  I truly enjoy getting and reading it.
Sincerely,
Eleanor

(((((((Eleanor))))))))  Thanks so much for the kind words....  Sometime we wonder if folks are really reading it  ;) 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From LYoung144

I read the "Fireside" every week with great anticipation.  That poem of Johnny Cash' is one of my favorites.  I am sure it is not that we are not interested in any of the tours offered but limited finances and health are big problems, as in my case.

((((((LYoung)))))))))  We appreciate the letter.....  and yes, I'm sure many folks are in the same boat as you are re the tours.  I guess I was just disappointed that there weren't more replies. 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
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NEW!!!!! GoldHobo@aol.com has told us if anyone wants info the the 85th NY Inf. Regt. (Plymouth Pilgrims) you may email her.  She has a book about them.    Her one request is that you put 85th Regt. in the subject line so she doesn't delete it by mistake

JLawson656@aol.com has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email.

GandMS@aol.com  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you.

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin/frye@gnat.net  does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com  Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

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"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
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If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html

April 3 - 4  Virginia  Living history, anniversary encampment at the Sailor's Creek Battlefield Historic State Park near Farmville. Demonstrations, special talks, Hillsman House open. Free. More information: 434-392-3435 or www.dcr.state.va.us.

April 12 - 17  South Carolina Special events in Charleston surrounding the burial of the crew of the CSS Hunley, the Confederate submarine recovered in 2000. Events include living history, lectures, musical performances, artillery demonstrations, presentation of facial reconstructions of the Hunley crew and programs at the site of the conservation of the submarine. Funeral-related events include visitations, laying in state and the April 17 burial at Magnolia Cemetery. Large crowds are expected. For current list of events and times, see www.hunley.org

April  24  Maryland  Special program, "Music of the Civil War," performances and discussion of the life and duties of Civil War musicians at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. 11 am-3 pm. Free with admission. 301-695-1864 or www.civilwarmed.org

April 24 - 25  Pennsylvania  Neshaminy Park Civil War Reenactment 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.  215-639-4538  For more information email neshaminysp@state.pa.us or contact: Russ Manning 215-920-2321 archducrj1@aol.com
Activities are open to the public Saturday and Sunday. In addition to the daily `Battles` there will be a host of Civil War programs throughout the day.

April 30 - May 2 Virginia  Battle of the Wilderness, 140th anniversary activities. Ellwood open 11 am-4:30 pm Friday and 11 am-5 pm during weekend. National Park plans activities. Check www.nps.gov/frsp for the latest information.

April 30 - May 2 Texas  Battle of Port Jefferson in Historic Jefferson, Texas
http://www.jefferson-texas.com/battle.htm

September 3 - 5, 2004 New Jersey.....  Battle of Cedar Bridge, Lake Manahawkin, NJ     Last Battle of the American War of Independence
http://www.telecottage.com/staffordhist/cedarbridge.html

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Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
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Time:  
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

April 1 & 2, 2004  -  OPEN CHAT

April 8 & 9, 2004  -  Our special Songs letters and poems nights.  If you would like to share something sent from your ancestor during the war, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne@aol.com and HOST FMLY Bill@aol.com

April 15 & 16, 2004 - OPEN CHAT

April 22 & 23, 2004 - Since there are five Thursdays and Fridays in the month, I'm going to make this week OPEN CHAT and then have a special program next week.

April 29 & 30, 2004 -  On the Homefront during the Civil War.  How do you suppose your ancestors family made out during the war while their husbands, sons, fathers, brothers were away in the war.  Who took care of the farms? 

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night. 

Bill and Jayne  :-)

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