February 1999 Weekly Fireside Newsletter

Hear Ye ..............Hear Ye 

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group; 
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 7 February 1999

Well Thursday night was great!! We always have a good time on OPEN CHAT nights as everyone can join in. We missed ya. 

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This Thursday is the 2nd Thursday of the month sooo it's time for Civil War Letters, Songs and Poems. You'll not want to miss this one. We'll be looking for you. We'll already have a fire going and we'll heating up some "Spiced Cider" for ya....

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE REALLY ENJOYED HAVING YOU :-)..... COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.... 

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The continuing series I'm putting in the newsletter under the HELP DESK, is on the Civil War Military 
Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers 
(FHCs)........ So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that 
we thought this would be of worth in your research.... 
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THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the 
New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters". 

New Postings since last we talked :-) All the "Past" newsletters to the Files Library Center in the Newsletters area for all newsletters of November 1998 and OLDER. For those in December 1998, January 1999 and Feb; those were uploaded into the NEW FILES area ... Also some really unique information passed on by SusiCP in her "RootsWeb" wanderings. This information is an ancient list of the burial sites of Kentucky Confederates buried in Georgia. As the researcher indicates many of these graves are probably long gone. And from JETFLYR2, a Biographical piece on William Gwin, Naval Officer.
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U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers............................. 

The next stage of this series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records 
available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

FINALLY Specific Confederate Sources........................... 

Records of the Confederate Army are located in the National Archives, state archives, and historical 
societies. Records at the National Archives will be discussed in this outline. For state service records, 
such as Alabama's "Confederate Service Records", 1861-1865 (FHL 67 films; FHLC computer number 
482117), see the state research outlines.

SERVICE RECORDS .........continued

CENSUS RECORDS
The "Thirteenth Population Census of the United States, 1910", National Archives Microfilm Publication T624 (FHL 1,784 films; FHLC computer number 176588) recorded whether an individual was a survivor of the Confederate Army (CA) or the Confederate Navy (CN). Some southern states took special censuses of Confederate veterans. Those at the Family History Library include ---
Alabama, 1907 (FHL films 1,533,727-30; FHLC computer number 482535), 1921 (FHL films 1,533,719-23; FHLC computer number 482535), and 1927 (FHL films 1,533,723, Item 2 and 1,533,724; FHLC computer number 482535).
Arkansas, 1911 (FHL fiche 6019335).
Louisiana, 1911 (FHL film 483,489 and 1,704,157, Item 14; index FHL book 976.3 M22j or film 1,822,969, Item 12).

CEMETERY RECORDS
About 250,000 Confederate soldiers died in the war. Most died of disease, but others were killed during battle or died in proson camps or hospitals. Raymond W. Watkins copied Confederate burials throughout the South, in prison camps, and in some Northern cemeteries. Many of his unpublished manuscripts are on microfilm at the Family History Library and are listed under his name in the Author/Tetle section of the library catalog.
Other important sources of Confederate burials include the following:

Office of the Commissioner for Marking the Graves of Confederate Dead. "Register of Confederate Soldiers, Sailors, and Citizens Who Died in Federal Prisons and Military Hospitals in the North, 1861-1865." Washington D.C.: War Department, 1912. National Archives Microfilm Publication M918. (FHL film 1,024,456.) These are lists arranged alphabetically by the location of death, then by the name of the soldier.

"Register of the Confederate Dead, Interred in Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va." Richmond, Va.: Gary, Clemmitt & Jones, Printers, 1869. (FHL book 975.545/R1 V22h; film 033,625.) Richmond city was a major burial site during the war. About 18,000 soldiers are interred there in the Hollywood Cemetery. The register lists the soldier's name, company, regiment, state, death date, section, and grave number.
.......................................Confederate Service Records to be continued.
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From: SusiCP
Read and lead > Love you guys. Susi

Civil War Medicine Museum located in Frederick, MD
at Old Frederick County, Maryland WebPage
http://members.aol.com/DorWinda/index.html
(Includes Washington Co, Montgomery Co, and western half of Carroll Co)

{{{Susi}}} Bless your heart... WHERE DO YOU FIND THIS STUFF???? 
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MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!.........................................................

Well here it is! In response to overwhelming number of emails indicating this to be a great idea, we have 
responded in kind..... Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or 
battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will 
post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near vicinity, and are willing to assist 
can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and work out the details. We recommend the "Requestor" 
pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" 
assistance between members. Do unto others as........ you know :-) Keep me posted on how this is 
working!!!! 
GFS Jim
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PICTURES OF THE GRAVESITE OF Edwin Nichols at the New Hope Battfield Cemetery are requested 
by Lkiwki@aol.com ..... If anyone can assist in this, please email this member direct and work out any 
details or additional information. Lynne, if you hit paydirt, let me know and I'll remove this posting.

The New Hope Battlefield is just off (North ?) of US Hwy 278 about 25 miles northwest of Atlanta, 
Georgia. Towns close or fairly close are Dallas, New Hope, Kennesaw, Braswell, Marietta. 
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From: Wmdperkins
In connection with the Civil War Newsletter I am requesting assistance with the following:
On the Stone there reads the following:

Daniel RUGGLES
1/1810 - 6/2/1897
Lt. Col., USA
Maj. Gen., CSA

Edward S. RUGGLES
7/10/1843 - 3/1/1919
Maj., USA ......................(is this an error????)

Richardetta Mason HOOE
11/19/1821 - 1/4/1904

The gravesite is in the Confederate Cemetery, Fredricksburg, Va., corner of Amelia St., and Washington St., north of the entrance road, stone is said to be "quite handsome". This is listed in "Tombstone Inscriptions of Spotsylvania Co., Va." written by Margaret C. Klein, printed Palm Coast, Fla., 1893. The text is stored in the NC State Archives, Raleigh, NC.
I am interested in any corrections to what is written on the stone as another source has son as a Maj., CSA. Also, what other data the cemetery might have, and, of course, a picture of the stone would be greatly appreciated. I have 1870, 80, and 1900 Fredricksburg, Va., census info on Daniel and Richardetta, she a US pensioner in 1900.
Thank you for your efforts - Bill Perkins

"Bill" we'll put this out in the Newsletter and see what the readers will say...... :-)
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DID YOU KNOW?? ................................... 
Excerpts from various areas of documented history or family journals........ 

Saturday [September 20, 1862] our regiment crossed the battlefield and went into camp near Sharpsburg, there rejoining the brigade, which was now commanded by Colonel Richard Coulter of the 11th Pennsylvania; General George L. Hartsuff, its former commander, had been severely wounded in the battle. Coulter was a big, quick man, vigouous, impatient, and often violent in speech and action. We felt an immediate liking for him.
We changed camp several times, finally settling down near the river and about three miles west of the town. An incident occurring there gave rise to a story that grew to fabulous proportions, multiplying converts to Christianity and the Baptist persuasion, until it bore to our Northern homes the glad tidings that entire regiments had enlisted in the army of the Lord. The way it began was this. Our chaplain, the Reverend George Bullen, baptized in the chill autumnal waters of the Potomac two men of our regiment, who had confessed their faith before they had left home. A few days later, Chaplain Bullen paid his respects to Colonel Coulter at brigade headquarters; and, declining as superfluous the customary social appetizer of old Bourbon, he told the Colonel all about the baptisms. He dwelt upon the probable good effects, both godly and military; the men, he felt sure, would be the more amenable to orders and discipline; he had not omitted, he said, to remind them that they should render unto Caesar. Now it happened that Colonel Coulter, though commanding the brigade, was jealously attentive to the growing reputation of his regiment. He interrupted suddenly: "How many men did you say you dipped, Chaplain?"
"I baptized two, Colonel."
"Orderly!" The Colonel's tone was peremptory. "Tell my adjutant to detail a sergeant to take a man from each company down to the river and baptize them in the Methodist persuasion. I can't allow any damned Baptist to supplant my authority, either spiritual or temporal."....................

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................ 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................ 
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From: AvalonPark
I love Civil War History and am an ardent admirer of your column. I hate to admit that I do not know what "hard tack" is. Could you please enlighten me. Thanks. Avalonpark@aol.com

{{Marjorie}} I love these kind of questions.... Hardtack is a saltless hard biscuit, bread or cracker. The term "Hardtack" came into being about 1836. It was also know as pilot biscuit or bread during that time. Before 1836, that same substance was referred to as sea biscuit back in 1690 or ship biscuit or bread around 1799. I found an interesting concoction called "burgoo" that is made from hardtack and molasses cooked to together. I would say that would probably "stick" to your ribs. :-)
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Subj: US Stamp Voting
From: rosewebb@datasync.com (Rose C. Webb)

US Postal Stamps......Cast your vote!!!!
The United States Postal Service is celebrateing the turn of the century by making a commemorative stamp series of each decade. The stamps up to 1980 have been voted and passed already and are in the making. But they are now taking votes for the 1980 stamp.

The Vietnam Veteran Memorial Wall has made it to the final round. Voting for this stamp begins Febuary 1999. You may cast your vote at your local postoffice or online at:
http://stampvote.msn.com/usps/welcome.asp

{{Rosie}}} Thanks Sis!!
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From: FI WATROUS

Cowboy's Guide To Life

Don't squat with your spurs on.
Don't interfere with something that ain't botherin' you none.
Timing has a lot to do with the outcome of a rain dance.
The easiest way to eat crow is while it's still warm. The colder it gets, the harder it is to swaller.
If you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is stop diggin'.
If it don't seem like it's worth the effort, it probably ain't.
It don't take a genius to spot a goat in a flock of sheep.
The biggest troublemaker you'll probably ever have to deal with watches you shave his face in the mirror 
every morning.
Never ask a barber if you need a haircut.
If you get to thinkin' you're a person of some influence, try orderin' somebody else's dog around.
Don't worry about bitin' off more'n you can chew; your mouth is probably a whole lot bigger'n you think.
Always drink upstream from the herd.
Generally, you ain't learnin' nothin' when your mouth's a jawin'.
Tellin' a man to git lost and makin' him do it are two entirely different propositions.
If you're ridin' ahead of the herd, take a look back every now and then to make sure it's still there with ya.
Good judgment comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgment.
When you give a personal lesson in meanness to a critter or to a person, don't be surprised if they learn 
their lesson.
When you're throwin' your weight around, be ready to have it thrown around by somebody else.
Lettin' the cat outta the bag is a whole lot easier than puttin' it back.
Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's sure 
crucial to know what it was.
The quickest way to double your money is to fold it over and put it back in your pocket.
Never, ever, miss a good chance to shut up.

{{{Ike}}} Being a Coloradoan, after I read this I had to stand up and sorta slouch some; tilt my hat back a mite and grin a little lop-sided... You know we ain't s'posed ta laugh right out loud; it ain't dignified, ya know... And folks might think you been off in the Loco Weed again.... LOL
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From: GLITZ01
Have you ever heard of the "BUTTERMILK RANGERS" that served in the Civil war. John Myrick Montgomery was supposed to have served in this unit and it was probably a rifle unit. Shirley

{{{Shirley}}} My research struck out on any unit named "Buttermilk Rangers". I discovered many units called rangers but only one (so far) that were called rifle rangers and that was the "Rifle Rangers of Florida" mentioned in a report from Col. D.H. Hill to Robert E. Lee from Yorktown, VA in Jun of 1861. If you have any more information, Please send. In the mean time HAVE ANY OF YOU UNIT EXPERTS OUT THERE HEARD OF UNIT ABOVE??????
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From: BJsAngels
Dear Jim,
I am wondering if anyone out there know anything about CAMP JONES in VA? I believe I had family there who died of Pneumonia on 27 Oct 61. His name was Pvt. Allen Gilliam from Pelham, TN. He was the son of Harris Gilliam and Nancy Reed. If anyone has any information please let me know.
BJsANGELS

BJsANGELS: the only reference I can find on Camp Jones in Virginia, is that it was in Northern Virginia, not to far from Washington D.C. It was near a place called Blue Sulphur and also near the Rollinsburg Road. That's the best I can come up with at the moment. Let's see if any of the membership has any additional information.....
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From: CKenter838
Hi Jim,
Do you have any idea of who Elizabeth Timms (from the POW reference in the last Weekly Fireside) was married to? I have a Timms line in SC>GA. What unit was her husband with. You mention that he was away in the ANV, when Elizabeth was taken north and imprisoned by the Yankees in Kentucky. I have been having problems tracing this Timms line. George Washington Pilgrim, Jr.'s wife was Martha Pernina Timms. They were both born in SC but married in GA. George served in the 6th Georgia Calvary under Wheeler. Any ideas that you can give me in hunting down Elizabeth's husband would be great.
Cheryl

{{Cheryl}} I don't have a clue what ANV stands for other than the V is probably Volunteer(s). I wracked my brain for the AN and drew a blank. The only suggestion I could give you is check the web site that went along with that reference that SusiCP had sent.
(ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ky/jefferson/cemeteries/cavehill.txt ) is the cemetery site. You might also try contacting Geoff Walden <gwalden@sw.cybersurf.de> Sons of Confederate Veterans Gen. Ben Hardin Helm Camp 1703, who according to the material runs that particular site.

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From: Samsawadee
Jim,
Read with interest your Weekly this time. I think one of the most impressive and comprehensive CW info pages for the CSA for one state is the one on Arkansas found at http://www.insolwwb.net/~egerdes/
This and connected pages also has AR Union units that they have gathered so far..they are still working on these as I know the 3rd AR Cav, Union isnt on yet (had GG-GF in that one). Also, you listed the film number for the TX Confed vets pensions index, that index is available on line thru the TX state library and or archives..cannot find the URL at this moment tho. Figgered you or Jane might have that in your own lil archives!!
Keep up good work!!
Sam

{{Sam}} Thanks, my friend for your feedback. I'll go find that Texas State Library URL and pub it.
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From: PinkPJ1934
Thank you all for helping me locate that little civil war cemetery on Tubman Rd. just west of Lewiston Rd. in Appaling Ga. I understand it cannot be seen from the road. I'm going to town hall tomorrow to check the information you all have been kind enough to forward. A very special thanks to Dr. Frank Clark for sending me the map.
Most sincerely
pinkpj1934@aol

From: AslanJ
Thanks Jim!!! Isn't it exciting to help someone find something that seemed impossible to find?? Been there, done that both as a receiver and a giver. Just as exciting, either way!
Judy

{{{Pink & Judy}}} This has been a neat example of how we hope for member assistance around the country to come to the aid of the "needy" LOL Hooray!!!!!
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From: GHowe8749

CIVIL WAR LIVES--NEAR EMMETT
Sutler supplies both sides' armies for re-enactments
by Tim Woodward
"The Idaho Statesman"

Emmett--Charles Lox answers the door of his country shop wearing jeans, a T-shirt and a Union Army shell coat.
"Come in," he says, "You can look around while I'm on the phone. I'm taking an order from Missouri."
The shop oozes history. Blue and gray uniforms line its shelves. Glass cases glisten with brass buttons, crossed sabers, gleaming belt buckles. The back room is stuffed with saddles, holsters, pistols, muskets, tents, cups, canteens, cooking pots. Copies of the "Civil War News" grace an antique tabletop.
Lox's rural home outside Emmett is the unlikely setting for one of the nation's largest mail-order businesses specializing in Civil War uniforms and equipment. 
With a telephone that never stops ringing and a computer mounted on a century-old sewing cabinet, he sells about $250,000 worth of Civil War Trappings annually.
"Now, where were we" he continues. "uh-oh, there's the phone again, ...An Enfield musketoon? Let me look it up. I haven't sold one of those lately."
Lox can tell you the precise differences between an Enfield musketoon, a Remington Zouabe and a Brown Bess, all Civil War rifles.
He's a voice of authority on kepis, bummers and slouch hats.
If you're in the market for a pair of wooden-pegged shoes with hickory shanks, a Confederate general's double-breasted, 14-button coat or a McClellan saddle, he's your man.
His business, C&C Sutlery, is one of the largest of its kind.
Sutlers were merchants who followed the troops during the Civil War, selling supplies. The United States, according to the Military Order of the Stars and Bars in Columbia, Tenn., is home to about 250 contemporary sutlers. Lox figures he's in the top 10.
"There are only about six that stock as much merchandise as I do. ...Ooops, there's the phone again.
"...An officer's uniform? What rank? The lower ranks wore gold bullion."
When he was starting out, Lox made some of the clothes himself. Now, he contracts with seven seamstresses, mostly in Nampa, to do the needlework. "It's their livelihood," he said. "The volume is high enough that they can make good money.
"If I sewed, I wouldn't have time to do anything else.
"I have three employees--me, myself and I. Me and myself don't do anything, so I have to do everything. Uh-oh, there goes the phone again..."
In Idaho, far from the nearest Civil War battlefield, Lox is unique.
"He's the only one in the state," said Ken Swanson, director of the Idaho Historical Museum and a member of Idaho Civil War Volunteers, Inc., a re-enactment group. "Most of them are in the East.
"...You used to have to have a retail store, but with phone mail and Internet services Charles can do it from wherever he wants. He doesn't need a store. But his shop is nice for the Idaho guys. You can go there and try things on, and you have a face to go with the voice on the phone.?
Lox's orders are equally divided between North and South, but Confederate Uniforms are more complicated. The Union Army's uniforms were just that--uniform. The South had nearly 30 styles and colors, with each state designing its own uniforms and variations. Lox knows them all.
"The South was more independent," he said, smiling. "From a historical standpoint, I guess that isn't surprising."
Idaho Civil War volunteer J Aydelotte, and Eagle resident who appeared as a battlefield soldier in the television series "North and South," is one of Lox's customers.
"I was surprised to find him out here," Aydelotte said. "His quality is comparable to most suppliers, his prices are better than some, and it's nice to have somebody you know personally and can deal with as an individual."
All of Lox's uniforms are made in Idaho. Much of the other merchandise available through his Internet catalog (www.ccsutlery.com) comes from other states and countries. Tents and leather goods are hand-stitched by the Amish in Illinois. Boots are made in Mexico. Brass work may come from as far away as India.
"One of the key things in this business is finding suppliers. Everything is made according to or close to the original specifications, and I guarantee it. If you send it back within 30 days, I'll take it, as long as it hasn't been used."
Prices range from a few dollars for brass insignia to $159.95 for a basic Union or Confederate Uniform to $595 for a McClellan saddle.
Why buys them?
I sell to re-enactors all over the U.S. For 80 percent of them, the appeal is going back to the 1860's and living like they did the. It's family-oriented. They like camping out and taking their wives and kids along. I sell period clothing for women and children, too.
"The other 20 percent just like to play army. And it's a completely different environment. You step out of the space age and into the 1800's. For a weekend, that's not bad."
Re-enactment groups stage Civil War battles, often in locales where they actually happened. A recent re-enactment at Gettysburg, Pa., drew 20,000 soldiers and more than 60,000 spectators.
Some say the war games serve a higher purpose.
"I keep a picture in my home of my great grandfather, who was a slave," black historian John Purce said from his home in Pocatello. "Older members of my family who have gone on and knew him said he was a very dignified man, and the Civil War was fought in part for human dignity.
"That's something we always need to remember. Some of what I hear about re-enactors is the old Rebel idea of hold onto the Confederacy, and I certainly couldn't support that part of it. But the other part is something we should never forget."
Lox started out as a re-enactor in Illinois.
"I was in it for the living history and the 1860s and the camping,: he said. "I got bored in the afternoons when there was nothing to do, so I put a table out and sold a few things. It grew from there.
"...I moved out here because I got tired of corn and soybeans. I have horses, and I like the mountains and the Western lifestyle."
The business he began in the '70s with one table now keeps him busy five days a week, filling mail orders to every state and traveling to sell direct at large-scale "battles" in Oregon, Washington and California. (With only 60 members in its group, Idaho has yet to hold more than skirmishes.)
When he isn't swamped with orders for Civil War gear, the main emphasis of his business, Lox keeps busy selling Indian War and cowboy memorabilia.
"It's a nice way to make a living," he said. "I'll never be rich, but it's something I enjoy doing. And as long as I can talk on the phone and run a computer, it's something I can do even when I'm 75 years old.
"Excuse me. There goes the phone again."

"Ghowe" Great article!! Thanks for sharing it.... 
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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate 
one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; 
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, 
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on 
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly 
Fireside." 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from 
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- 
haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFS Jayne, GFH TEG 
and GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :) 

2/11/99 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send in any that you would like shared.... 
These are great evenings. Come out and enjoy a treat!!

2/18/99 - OPEN CHAT

2/25/99 - "Gettysburg Night - Part II - stories and tales collected over the years by GFH TEG (our own Tom :-)) You'll notice this is Part II and therefore a continuation of Tom's collection. 

3/4/99 - OPEN CHAT

3/11/99 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send in any that you would like shared.... 
These are great evenings. These are indeed special evenings.

3/18/99 - OPEN CHAT

3/25/99 - "Gettysburg Night - Part III - stories and tales collected over the years by GFH TEG (our own Tom :-)) Yes, there are more :)

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne, GFH TEG and GFS Jim

Hear Ye ..............Hear Ye 

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group; 
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 14 February 1999

Thursday night was most enjoyable with the Letters, Songs and Poems provided. We went through a ton 
and had a great attendance. For those that couldn’t make it, we missed ya.... The items shared Thursday 
will be posted in the History Lectures area of the Files Library for the downloading pleasure....
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This Thursday is OPEN CHAT again. We have a great time and it’s open forum for questions, answers, 
cries for help and just plain fun. Come on out and join us.

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE REALLY ENJOYED HAVING 
YOU :-)..... COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.... 

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This continuing series I'm putting in the newsletter under the HELP DESK, is on the Civil War Military 
Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers 
(FHCs)........ This week’s material will bring to a close there long running series. If you would like 
previous week’s information about these records, check the “Weekly Firesides” either in the New Files 
area or in the Logs and Newsletters area of the Files Library. They are all there. We’ll certainly continue 
to field any of your questions. 
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THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the 
New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters". 

New Postings since last we talked :-) All the "Past" newsletters to the Files Library Center in the 
Newsletters area for all newsletters of November 1998 and OLDER. For those in December 1998, January 
1999 and Feb; those were uploaded into the NEW FILES area ... The Letters, Songs and Poems from last 
Thursday will also be posted in their usual place (History Lectures)......
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U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers............................. 

The completion of the Confederate Sources........................... 

VETERANS and LINEAGE ORGANIZATION RECORDS

United Daughters of the Confederacy. This society was established in 1894. Their address is:

United Daughters of the Confederacy
328 North Boulevard
Richmond, VA 23220

Sons of Confederate Veterans. This society was established in 1896. Members who are also descendants 
of Confederate officers or governmental officials are eligible to join the Military Order of the Stars and 
Bars. The address of both organizations is:

Sons of Confederate Veterans
Elm Springs
Box 59
Columbia, TN 38401-0059

From 1893-1932, the official publication of Confederate veteran and lineage organizations was 
Confederate Veteran, 1893-1932, Reprint (wendell, N.C.: Broadfoot’s Bookmark, n.d.; G|FHL book 973 
B2cv vols. 1-40; films 1,697,372; 1,697,375-78; 1,425,669-75). It resumed publication in about 1986 
(FHL book 973 B2cx). It published lively first-person historical accounts, and obituaries of deceased 
veterans.

Below is an index to the first 40 volumes:

Manarin, Louis H., and Robert S. Bridges, eds.
Cumulative Index, The Confederate Veteran
Magazine, 1893-1932. 3 vols. Wilmington, N.C.:
Broadfoot Publishing Co., 1986. (FHL 973
B2cva index, film 1,425,669.)

SOURCES FOR FURTHER READING

Beers, Henry Putney, The Confederacy: A Guide to the Archives of the Government of the Confederate 
States of America. 1968. Reprint. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1986. 
(FHL book 973 A5mb.)

Groene, Bertram Hawthorne. Tracing Your Civil War Ancestor. Winston-Salem, N.C.: John F. Blair, 
1973, 1987. (FHL book 973 D27gb.)

Munden, Kenneth W., and Henry Putney Beers. The Union: A Guide to Federal Archives Relating to the 
Civil War. 1962. Reprint. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1986. (FHL book 
973 A5m; fiche 6051302.) This book describes holdings of the National Archives, federal records centers, 
and other federal agencies.

Neagles, James C. Confederate Research Sources: A Guide to Archive Collections. Salt Lake City, Utah: 
Ancestry Publishing Co., 1986. (FHL book 973 A34ne.) This book describes and gives the current 
location of genealogical records in state archives, the National Archives, and other libraries in the 
Southern and border states.
***********************************************************************************
From: MDelPa

Jimmy,
saw this is the Ancestry Daily News... didn't know whether you might want to pass it on in the Weekly 
Fireside or not...
Jayne

Confederate Military History CD-ROM
http://shop.ancestry.com/ancestry/conmilhiscd.html 
For Civil War history buffs and genealogists who want to better understand the
whys and wherefores of secession as well as the historical context in which
their southern (or for that matter, northern) ancestors lived, Confederate
Military History is a must! This important CD-ROM contains twelve volumes of
confederate perspectives on the War Between the States. Its revelations
include: 

~ The legal justification of the South in secession 
~ A civil history of the Confederate States 
~ Biographical sketches of key confederate civil and military leaders 
~ A state-by-state history of involvement in the Confederacy and military
operations 
~ The morale of the Confederate Armies 
~ The Constitution of the Confederate States of America 
And so much more! 

Easy to use query functions let you search by any name, place, or other keyword
to quickly locate relevant information. And the content is so compelling,
you'll find yourself reading on just for fun! Written in the 1890's by notable
Confederate officers, statesmen, and scholars who lived through the great
conflict, this narrative history is an invaluable "first-hand" historical
reference you don't want to be without. Includes dozens of photos and other
illustrations, too.

{{{Jayne}}} Thanks for the tip. I certainly will post this one.
*********************************************************************************
From: rosewebb@datasync.com (Rose C. Webb)

Good afternoon folks,
I have uploaded two new Units on the CW page and they are:
"Earnest’s Company, Local Defense- Montgomery Co." 
and a two part page for this unit:
"Washington Artillery (Etter’s Battery)"

Several hundreds of Arkansas soldiers both CSA and USA have been added
to the "Arkansas Confederate and Union Soldier's Burial Place". This is
an ongoing project, so I'd check back frequently if you are still
looking for your family.
Good Luck!
Jeri, Edward G. Gerdes and Bryan Howerton.
-- 
"but I remain your affectinate cosin untill death."
Thank you again ggrandpa Davis for those words.
Never dreamed I'd get to use em!

{{{Rosie}}} Thanks again “Sis”.
*********************************************************************************
From: FI WATROUS

LDS Church to go online with family history Web site 
By KATIE PARKER 
parker@du2.byu.edu 
NewsNet Staff Writer

The Family History Department of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is working to make genealogical files accessible from a family history Web site. Elaine Hasleton, a public affairs representative from the Family History Center in the Joseph Smith Memorial Building, said the Web site is in its developmental stages. The project is underway, however Hasleton said no set completion date 
has been given. 

The ancestral files of the LDS Church will most likely be accessible from the site, said Craig Foster, a spokesman for the family history center's public affairs projects. Foster said the details of what other files and information will be accessible from the site is not final. "We are all excited about the future for family history," said Jana Darrington, 21, a senior from Mesa, Ariz., majoring in family history. 

As the department assistant for the Harold B. Lee Library's family history department, Darrington said many people have asked about the possibility of family history files going online. "This will make things much more available for the patrons and make genealogy work widely known," she said. Darrington expects the number of people going to family history centers to naturally decline once the files become available from home. "But I'm sure the elderly who don't feel comfortable using the Internet will still make use of the facilities," Darrington said. 

Lynda Cameron of Provo visits the HBLL Family History Center at least once a week, sometimes more. 
"Making a Web site for family history seems like a logical thing for the LDS Church to do," Cameron said. Cameron is originally from Australia, where her father, Keith Williams, still resides. She said they are both working on genealogy for their family continents apart. "This will really open information up for my father and make things more available for everyone," Cameron said. "It would be a dream to be able to work out of my home. I can work for as long as I want, whenever I want." 

Darrington also mentioned that this new project with family history will introduce many non-members to the LDS Church. "There are many people who work on family history that are not Mormon," she said. 
Many of them already use LDS family history departments, and with the future Web site many more will become familiar with the LDS Church, Darrington said. 

"Making a Web site for family history seems like a logical thing for the LDS Church to do ... It would be a dream to be able to work out of my home. I can work for as long as I want, whenever I want."
-- Lynda Cameron, Provo, regular HBLL Family History Center patron 

This story was posted on Tuesday, February 2 1999 © NewsNet. All rights 
reserved.

“Ike” - thanks for sending the article... This is indeed news.
*********************************************************************************
From: Ufopdg

Greetings to all Massey list readers:
I am not a Massey descendant, or a reader of this list, but I saw the message below on another list, and I thought by forwarding it to your list I might help the lost grave stone be returned to it's proper location. If anyone on the list knows the burial site of Mr. Massey, please contact Mr. McClurkin (and inform me also), or you can just contact me if you wish, and I can pass it along to Mr. McClurkin. I would appreciate being informed if the problem is resolved. Many thanks for any assistance you can offer.

Ray James
Commander
Sons of Confederate Veterans
Sul Ross Camp 1457
-------------------------------------
Ray W. James, P.E., Ph.D.
Civil Engineering Department
Texas A&M University
College Station, TX 77843
Phone (409)845-7436; Fax (409)845-3410
E-mail: r-james@tamu.edu
-------------------------------------
I received a phone call today from the Parker County Sheriff's
Department concerning a Confederate Headstone that they discovered at the
residence of "someone they are quite interested in." They were kind enough
to make color photographs of it for me. It is a stone that has been taken
from a cemetery. They have no idea where it came from and they do not know
the previous travels of their "bad guy." It is a V.A. issue stone and the
information on it is a follows:

G.D. Massey
Co. A.
8th LA. CAV.
C.S.A.

Would you please get the word out so that this stone can be returned
to the Confederate Hero. Thank you.
Howard McClurkin
Weatherford, Texas
(817) 613-1462

{{Pat}} Thanks for passing along the “Public Service”......:)
*********************************************************************************

MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!.........................................................

Well here it is! In response to overwhelming number of emails indicating this to be a great idea, we have 
responded in kind..... Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or 
battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will 
post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near vicinity, and are willing to assist 
can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and work out the details. We recommend the "Requestor" 
pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" 
assistance between members. Do unto others as........ you know :-) Keep me posted on how this is 
working!!!! 
GFS Jim
***********************************************
PICTURES OF THE GRAVESITE OF Edwin Nichols at the New Hope Battfield Cemetery are requested 
by Lkiwki@aol.com ..... If anyone can assist in this, please email this member direct and work out any 
details or additional information. Lynne, if you hit paydirt, let me know and I'll remove this posting.

The New Hope Battlefield is just off (North ?) of US Hwy 278 about 25 miles northwest of Atlanta, 
Georgia. Towns close or fairly close are Dallas, New Hope, Kennesaw, Braswell, Marietta. 
##########################
From: Wmdperkins
In connection with the Civil War Newsletter I am requesting assistance with the following:
On the Stone there reads the following:

Daniel RUGGLES
1/1810 - 6/2/1897
Lt. Col., USA
Maj. Gen., CSA

Edward S. RUGGLES
7/10/1843 - 3/1/1919
Maj., USA ......................(is this an error????)

Richardetta Mason HOOE
11/19/1821 - 1/4/1904

The gravesite is in the Confederate Cemetery, Fredricksburg, Va., corner of Amelia St., and 
Washington St., north of the entrance road, stone is said to be "quite handsome". This is listed in 
"Tombstone Inscriptions of Spotsylvania Co., Va." written by Margaret C. Klein, printed Palm Coast, 
Fla., 1893. The text is stored in the NC State Archives, Raleigh, NC.
I am interested in any corrections to what is written on the stone as another source has son as a 
Maj., CSA. Also, what other data the cemetery might have, and, of course, a picture of the stone would be 
greatly appreciated. I have 1870, 80, and 1900 Fredricksburg, Va., census info on Daniel and 
Richardetta, she a US pensioner in 1900.
Thank you for your efforts - Bill Perkins

"Bill" we'll put this out in the Newsletter and see what the readers will say...... :-)
###########################
Subj: Locating a grave..
From: Scotlinda

I would be interested in getting a picture of the grave of my husband's gg grandfather, ROBERT 
SYLVESTER, he served with the 15th Infantry Regiment Company E from NJ. The information I have is 
that he is buried in the National Cemetery in Fredricksburg, VA. Division B, Section D, Grave 306. He 
died December 5, 1862, of typhoid fever shortly after mustering in on August 25th, 1862.
Thanks so much for any help..of course I will pay costs for film and mailing.
Carolee Logan

{{{Carolee}}} We’ll put it up and see what hits we get....
***********************************************************************************
DID YOU KNOW?? ................................... 
Excerpts from various areas of documented history or family journels........ 

“Trifling in Ranks,” read the first citation calling for demerits against the young West Point 
cadet. That was in 1857. So was, “Highly Unmilitart & trifling conduct throwing stones on post.” And 
1858 was hardly any better. February 1: “Unauthorized articles in ventilator.” March 8: “Cooking 
Utensils in chimney.” April 3: “Hair out of uniform” -- Mark that one! May 14: “Gazing about in ranks.” 
And so on, until his graduation from the Military Academy in June of 1861 -- after the Civil War had 
begun with the firing on Fort Sumter and a few other minor clashes.
As the demerits and behavior pattern might suggest, he graduated thirty-fourth in a class of 
thirty-four -- dead last. And highest of all in total demerits earned.
And for what further activities had he been cited in those years, beyond gazing about in ranks on 
May 14, 1858? Well, they found rubbish behind his tent one time. He had a bad four days in January of 
1859: late to parade one day, to company formation for dinner another day, to supper itself that same day, 
and to breakfast still another January day.
In February, just days later, he was officially chastised for laughing and talking at the wrong time 
and place, for throwing snowballs (again at the wrong time and place), and in March for throwing bread 
in the Mess Hall!
Over the next few months they got him again and again: for boisterous noise in the sink (yes, 
sink), for idle laughing and talking, for defacing a wall with his pencil, for a room “grossly out of order, 
bed down & floor not swept.”
Nor did his demeanor ever really improve, indication of his future pattern in life. He like to do 
things his own way. He did not buckle easily before authority. He had bread, butter, potatoes, even plates, 
knives, and forks in his quarters one day in March 1860 -- the same day that his room was cited for being 
such a mess.
On July 4 that year, not yet abashed, he was spotted swinging arms while marching from dinner. 
He now gave strong clues to the future man and soldier. February 3, 1861: “Long beard at inspection,” 
and March 10, 1861: “Long hair at insp.”
He finished out his career at the point with once more throwing snowballs (in a rare April 
snowstorm), sitting at a window in shirtsleeves “with feet on sill, wearing an unofficial ornament on his 
coat,” packing too much “furniture” in his tent, and finally, twice more swinging his arms while on 
march.
Upon his graduation from west Point, the Civil War interceded just in time for him to avoid a 
court-martial for a minor offense. He was able to report for duty one July morning and fight the Battle of 
Bull run later the same day. A lieutenant to start with, he was a grigadier general of volunteers two years 
later at age twenty-three.
He finished the war at U.S. Grant’s side at Appomattox with the temporary rank of major general 
-- and a name that already was legend, at least in the North. As a reward, Phil Sheridan presented this 
bright young officer with the small pine table that was at Grant’s side for the historic surrender ceremony 
in the Wilmer McLean home at Appomattox.
An old West Point chum was at Appomattox, too -- the Confederate Futzhugh Lee. They 
embraced, then fell on the ground and “rassled.” Just like the old days.
Earlier in the war, things weren’t quite so amicable between this young soldier and the 
Confederates. Daring, flamboyance, and something more -- a real cruel streak -- all contributed to his 
meteoric reputation.
Daring? At Bull Run he was cited for bravery. In the Peninsula campaign not quite a year later, 
“Little Mac” McClellan was looking for a place to ford the Chickahominy River east of Richmond. With 
Rebels thick on the far side, anyone testing the river’s depth would be a tempting target. Our West 
Pointer plunged into the water and pushed slowly across. McClellan was so impressed he promoted the 
young man to captain and made him a staff aide.
That summer came a battle at White Oak swamp in which the young man killed an enemy officer 
by chasing him down on horse-back, shouting for him to surrender, then shooting him in the back when 
the Reb continued riding on instead. The West Pointer later came across the victim’s riderless horse. He 
decided to keep it and the saddle --” a splendid one, covered with black morocco and ornamented with 
silver nails” He also garnered a handsome double edged sworde from his unknown Confederate victim.
It was probably his first “kill,” said biographer Evan S. Connell, and possibly he didn’t even 
think of the horse, sword, and hansome saddle at the outset. But George Armstong Custer did write his 
sister Lydia Ann, “I selected him as my game.”
************************************************************************************
A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................ 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................ 
************************************************************************************
From: AslanJ

Jim and Jayne - I have a Q for you:
Have y'all heard of the Roswell, GA episode of the women taken from the cotton mills by train to the north and left, deserted? I just heard about it this past week at the library, from a lady who is studying to be a tour guide. I didn't have time to search it out, but she told me that she had read an article about it. 
Seems that northern troops were going through Roswell and burning down the cotton mills along the way. Some women who were working at the big mill there in Roswell were taken and put on a train. Someone had tried to track down the women and their descendants. Apparently they were left on their own in a big northern town. Did you ever hear about this?
Judy Canant

{{Judy}} That is certainly a new story to me. DOES ANYONE ELSE KNOW OF THIS EVENT??? Send us line if you do....
*************************************************************************************
From: Bipsylou
I appreciate your sending me this info. I participate in two chat rooms a week and subscribe to two newsgroups. I am trying to lessen my time on the computer as some of my other projects are being neglected. Sorry I don't make you room very often.

{{Bipsylou}} - That is exactly why we do the newsletter. You know how schedules are. We’re certainly glad that the “Fireside” is meeting a general need out there :-)....
************************************************************************************
From: GLITZ01
Have you ever heard of the "BUTTERMILK RANGERS" that served in the Civil war. John Myrick 
Montgomery was supposed to have served in this unit and it was probably a rifle unit. Shirley

{{{Shirley}}} My research struck out on any unit named "Buttermilk Rangers". I discovered many units 
called rangers but only one (so far) that were called rifle rangers and that was the "Rifle Rangers of 
Florida" mentioned in a report from Col. D.H. Hill to Robert E. Lee from Yorktown, VA in Jun of 1861. 
If you have any more information, Please send. In the mean time HAVE ANY OF YOU UNIT EXPERTS 
OUT THERE HEARD OF UNIT ABOVE??????
*************************************************************************************
From: BJsAngels
Dear Jim,
I am wondering if anyone out there know anything about CAMP JONES in VA? I believe I had family 
there who died of Pneumonia on 27 Oct 61. His name was Pvt. Allen Gilliam from Pelham, TN. He was 
the son of Harris Gilliam and Nancy Reed. If anyone has any information please let me know.
BJsANGELS

BJsANGELS: the only reference I can find on Camp Jones in Virginia, is that it was in Northern 
Virginia, not to far from Washington D.C. It was near a place called Blue Sulphur and also near the 
Rollinsburg Road. That's the best I can come up with at the moment. Let's see if any of the membership 
has any additional information..... NOTE: I’ll leave this up one more week.
*************************************************************************************
From: CKenter838
Hi Jim,
Do you have any idea of who Elizabeth Timms (from the POW reference in the last Weekly Fireside) was 
married to? I have a Timms line in SC>GA. What unit was her husband with. You mention that he was 
away in the ANV, when Elizabeth was taken north and imprisoned by the Yankees in Kentucky. I have 
been having problems tracing this Timms line. George Washington Pilgrim, Jr.'s wife was Martha 
Pernina Timms. They were both born in SC but married in GA. George served in the 6th Georgia 
Calvary under Wheeler. Any ideas that you can give me in hunting down Elizabeth's husband would be 
great.
Cheryl

{{Cheryl}} Well I sure got a ton of responses on ANV.... Duh!!!!! Army of Northern Virginia..... 
LOL
*************************************************************************************
From: Samsawadee
Jim,
Read with interest your Weekly this time. I think one of the most impressive and comprehensive CW info 
pages for the CSA for one state is the one on Arkansas found at http://www.insolwwb.net/~egerdes/
This and connected pages also has AR Union units that they have gathered so far..they are still working 
on these as I know the 3rd AR Cav, Union isnt on yet (had GG-GF in that one). Also, you listed the film 
number for the TX Confed vets pensions index, that index is available on line thru the TX state library 
and or archives..cannot find the URL at this moment tho. Figgered you or Jane might have that in your 
own lil archives!!
Keep up good work!!
Sam

{{Sam}} Thanks, my friend for your feedback. I'll go find that Texas State Library URL and pub it.
*************************************************************************************
WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate 
one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; 
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, 
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on 
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly 
Fireside." 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from 
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- 
haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFS Jayne, GFH TEG 
and GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :) 

2/18/99 - OPEN CHAT

2/25/99 - "Gettysburg Night - Part II - stories and tales collected over the years by GFH TEG (our own 
Tom :-)) You'll notice this is Part II and therefore a continuation of Tom's collection. 

3/4/99 - OPEN CHAT

3/11/99 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send in any that you would like shared.... 
These are great evenings. These are indeed special evenings.

3/18/99 - OPEN CHAT

3/25/99 - "Gettysburg Night - Part III - stories and tales collected over the years by GFH TEG (our own 
Tom :-)) Yes, there are more :)

.............and that take’s us to the end of the month of March.

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne, GFH TEG and GFS Jim

Hear Ye ..............Hear Ye 

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group; 
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 21 February 1999

OH MY!! What a "Rowdy" gang Thursday night. A great night of OPEN CHAT! And what an awesome crop of new folk. I'll bet half the room were "first-timers" Thursday.. We had a ball... I want you all to “light a candle” for GFS Jayne.. Her computer’s CMOS battery finally bit the dust and she’s been without Online access for about a week now. Hopefully she gets her computer back on Thursday (early) in time for the Fireside but that’s a toss up... LOL She’s going into Internet Depravation.... !!

Now to respond to the many queries about the BILLION copies of the newsletter that got out to many of you multiple times. First I APPOLOGIZE !!!!!!! I had no idea the AOL mainframe went so “Bonkers”.. LOL The night I sent the newsletter out, the system was really gagging and I received a ton of system timeouts. Well normally when that happens, it means the remote email interface to the Virginia AOL Main servers is “gagging” and has failed to transmit the email packet I sent out. So I just resend it. Well that wasn’t the case last week. It gagged alright, but somehow got into a loop and sent multiple copies out. Oh well. “Life is a Riot if You Don’t WEAKEN” Heh Heh
**************
This Thursday is Gettysburg Night Part II. This is indeed a special series, provided us by our own co-host GFH TEG. We had a great turn out last month for the inaugural session, and based on the feedback should have quite a crowd this Thursday. So mark your calendar and come on out.
********************
FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE REALLY ENJOYED HAVING 
YOU :-)..... COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.... 

************************************************************************************* 
THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the 
New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters". 

New Postings since last we talked :-) The Weekly Fireside for 2/14/99 is now available in the New Uploads area of the Files Library. 
***************************************************************************** Volunteer to Look-Up Andersonville Prison records
From: FI WATROUS

Isn't this a great offer?
Ike and Nancy Watrous
==============================
Hi, My name is Kevin Frye and I want to volunteer a service that I have had a great deal of success with. My roots are deep in Westmoreland County Pennsylvania and I have had so much help with researching info that I want to repay in the only way that I can.....By offering something that has
proven helpful for others.

I live in Middle Georgia and about 40 miles from Andersonville Prison. I have family that fought for the union and my wife ( who is local to this area) had ancesters who fought for the South. This brings intresting discussions about the Civil War and leads us to visit Andersonville often. Here is what I want to do.....I posted this offer to the Westmoreland site as well as the Cambria County site.

I will research for anyone who feels there were ancesters at Andersonville to find out what info might be in their database. I have found records and grave sites,and have taken photos for people who sent me request, and mailed them for what small donation they are willing to send to cover my cost as well as my donation to the Museum when I visit there. Out of about 30 request so far I have been able to " find" 12 graves and info such as.....State and unit served, Rank, Where they were captured, date of death and grave number. Most have some if not all of this information. I know if I post on all these sites that I will be over run but would like to post it somehow. I also can’t subscribe to all the sites and wait for responses....Any suggestions???? This has turned into an enjoyable hobby in the past month or so and I would
really like to extend this offer to those who won't ever get to the site....

Kevin Frye, Butler Georgia
Frye@gnat.net

[Kevin] Ike and Nancy Watrous ran across your offer and forwarded it to the Amercan Civil War History Special Interest Group on America On-Line. We have a section we call “Members Helping Members” which I would like to post your offer. I will add you to our distribution of the “Weekly Fireside” newsletter which currently has about 850 on weekly distribution. Many of these members forward the newsletter on to relatives, friends or other Civil War History buffs like ourselves. We seem to get many questions about ancestors who died at Andersonville and how they would go about getting information on them. So this forward from Ike and Nancy seemed a neat answer. If you approve my request, then we will publish your offer weekly in the newsletter. If you would rather not, then I’ll just refer you to individuals who ask specific questions about Andersonville ancestors. Drop us a line; we’ll be watching for it.... :-)
*********************************************************************************
From: MMeadPond

DAR_LIB - The DAR Library Catalog is NOW online! I just got word that you can now search the DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution) Card Catalog ONLINE! I typed in Mead, and got 32 hits!
So hurry and try it before everyone finds out~


And if you find a book you need, they say this:
INTERLIBRARY LOAN

If you find an item of interest that is not available in your library's collection, you may be able to borrow it from the holding library through Interlibrary Loan. To activate the Interlibrary Loan option click the Request Form button (some libraries do not have this option available to individual patrons, please check your library for their own Interlibrary Loan policy). Complete the form and select Publish ILL Form or Mail Request Form. This will convert the Interlibrary Loan/Request form to a document that is ready to be printed, saved to a file, or e-mailed to a specific location (the email option can be performed automatically). Check with your library about specific Interlibrary Loan policies.

{{{Mosey}}} Great information. Thank you Sis :-)
*********************************************************************************
From: rosewebb@datasync.com (Rose C. Webb)

Civil War Journal, Salisbury

Here is a most interesting site, a journal written by a young lady,
during the North's raid upon Salisbury, Rowan co NC.
http://www.historynet.com/CivilWarTimes/articles/1999/03992_text.htm

Virginia
wtsongwriter@geocities.com

MT PLEASANT CEMETERY AT TANGLEWOOD
http://www.geocities.com/Nashville/Opry/1166/mtplea/mtplea.htm
GRANNY'S GENEALOGY PAGE http://www.geocities.com/nashville/opry/1166/
FLESHER HOMEPAGE http://www.public.usit.net/gflesher
SONGWRITING http://www.geocities.com/Nashville/Opry/7077/

{{{Rosie}}} As usual, your material is the greatest......
*********************************************************************************
From: SusiCP
Subj: Andersonville online
I just received a email telling me the address didnt come through....Here it is.......

http://www.corinthian.net/mccc/plookup.htm
Susi

{{{Susi}}} thanks for the added info.
*********************************************************************************

MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!.........................................................

Well here it is! In response to overwhelming number of emails indicating this to be a great idea, we have 
responded in kind..... Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or 
battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will 
post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near vicinity, and are willing to assist 
can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and work out the details. We recommend the "Requestor" 
pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" 
assistance between members. Do unto others as........ you know :-) Keep me posted on how this is 
working!!!! 
GFS Jim
***********************************************
PICTURES OF THE GRAVESITE OF Edwin Nichols at the New Hope Battfield Cemetery are requested 
by Lkiwki@aol.com ..... If anyone can assist in this, please email this member direct and work out any 
details or additional information. Lynne, if you hit paydirt, let me know and I'll remove this posting.

The New Hope Battlefield is just off (North ?) of US Hwy 278 about 25 miles northwest of Atlanta, 
Georgia. Towns close or fairly close are Dallas, New Hope, Kennesaw, Braswell, Marietta. 
##########################
From: Wmdperkins
In connection with the Civil War Newsletter I am requesting assistance with the following:
On the Stone there reads the following:

Daniel RUGGLES
1/1810 - 6/2/1897
Lt. Col., USA
Maj. Gen., CSA

Edward S. RUGGLES
7/10/1843 - 3/1/1919
Maj., USA ......................(is this an error????)

Richardetta Mason HOOE
11/19/1821 - 1/4/1904

The gravesite is in the Confederate Cemetery, Fredricksburg, Va., corner of Amelia St., and 
Washington St., north of the entrance road, stone is said to be "quite handsome". This is listed in 
"Tombstone Inscriptions of Spotsylvania Co., Va." written by Margaret C. Klein, printed Palm Coast, 
Fla., 1893. The text is stored in the NC State Archives, Raleigh, NC.
I am interested in any corrections to what is written on the stone as another source has son as a 
Maj., CSA. Also, what other data the cemetery might have, and, of course, a picture of the stone would be 
greatly appreciated. I have 1870, 80, and 1900 Fredricksburg, Va., census info on Daniel and 
Richardetta, she a US pensioner in 1900.
Thank you for your efforts - Bill Perkins

"Bill" we'll put this out in the Newsletter and see what the readers will say...... :-)
###########################
Subj: Locating a grave..
From: Scotlinda

I would be interested in getting a picture of the grave of my husband's gg grandfather, ROBERT 
SYLVESTER, he served with the 15th Infantry Regiment Company E from NJ. The information I have is 
that he is buried in the National Cemetery in Fredricksburg, VA. Division B, Section D, Grave 306. He 
died December 5, 1862, of typhoid fever shortly after mustering in on August 25th, 1862.
Thanks so much for any help..of course I will pay costs for film and mailing.
Carolee Logan

{{{Carolee}}} We'll put it up and see what hits we get....
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DID YOU KNOW?? ................................... 
Excerpts from various areas of documented history or family journals........ 

"Old Ruffin" they called him. Born in '94 - 1794, that is, - he really was old, by comparison with the combatants of the Civil War. Other combatants, one should keep in mind, since he himself took part in the fighting and indeed fired two famous and significant artillery rounds still noted in many histories of the Civil War.
Virginia-born Edmund Ruffin, in fact, remains at the center of a very old dispute: Who fired the first shot of the Civil War?
For years--decades even-- many said it was the fire-breathing secessionist Ruffin himself. Others said, no. In any case, it apparently is true that he fired one of the very first rounds at hapless Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor.
A gentleman of Virginia's plantation society, Ruffin studied for a time at the College of William and Mary and in his prime as a serious farmer was a progressive agronomist, an advocate of crop rotation, and president of the Farmer's Register. Also a veteran of the War of 1812, he eventually became consumed by the issue of slavery versus abolition. He attended the hanging of abolitionist John Brown and made it his business to present every Southern governor with one of the pikes that Brown would have used to arm revolting Virginia slaves. Ruffin traveled throughout the South years before the Civil War, urgin secession, calling for the creation of a new country, and writing articles in the same vein. One of his publications was "Slavery and Free Labor Described and Compared."
It was no surprise, then, that he was present when south Carolina led the way to secession with its defiant vote of December 20, 1960. He happily noted the wild cheers of the onlookers at the signing of the secession ordinance that evening.
Early on the morning of April 12, he was at Charleston's Cummings Point at the tip of Morris Island. There, as an honorary member of the Palmetto Guards, the sixty-sevn-year-old was accorded the privilege of firing the first round from Columbiad No. 1 at Fort Sumter out in the harbor.
Confederate General Pierre G.T. Beauregard later said, however, the historic Ruffin shot was not really the first one of the entire Civil War, as often was alleged ever after. “The peaceful stillness of the night was broken just before dawn,” wrote Beauregard. “From Fort Johnson’s mortar battery, at 4:30 am, April 12, 1861, issued the irst -- and, as many thought, the too-long deferred -- signal shell of the war. It was fired, not by Mr. Edmund Ruffin of Virginia, as has been erroneously believed, but by George S. James, of South Carolina, to whom Captain Stephen D. Lee issued the order.”
Even if Ruffin’s gun cam into action shortly after the shell that signaled the start of the Civil War, the fanatical longhaired oldster cut quite a figure in his uniform of South Carolina’s Palmetto Guards. After the younger men of the same outfit were sent to Virginia, Ruffin was still much in evidence. “Old Ruffin has honored our company with a visit,” wrote Palmetto member Charles M. Furman in May 1861, “The old gentleman intended presenting us with a flag, but finding us well supplied in that particular, he made a donation of one hundred dollars. The old man is a real patriot, his purse, his pen & his aged frame are all in turn called upon to contribute to the great cause upon which his heart is fixed.”
Nor was this elderly legend-in-process through with his activity as an amateur artillerist. His next famous shot would come in July -- it also is alleded -- during the fighting near First Bull Run. The hated Yankees were in retreat on the Warrenton Turnpike in the direction of Washington. The roadway crossed two bridges, and Honorary Private Ruffin was nearby, watching the Union flight with members of a Virginia Artillery battery. The younger sharpshooters of Delaware Kemper’s Battery asked the famous “first-shooter” if he would like to fire an honorary round with a gun aimed at one of the turnpike bridges: the Cub Run span.
He was more than happy to oblige. And wonder of wonders, it allegedly was Ruffin’s own shot that squarely hit the bridge and upended a wagon across it’s roadway, blocking ti.
“Wagons waiting to cross the bridge were now abandonded by their terrified drivers, who chose to wade the creek,” wrote Glenn Dedmondt in his book Southern Bronze.” A great quantity of wagons and equipment would be later captured by the South as a result of this single artillery round.”
It was to no avail, of course, and in the end the South bowed to the superior manpower and resources of the Union. That was too much for Edmund Ruffin, who in June 1865 -- two months after Lee’s surrender at Appomattox -- died an untimely death as a suicide who refused to live in the restored United States.

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................ 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................ 
************************************************************************************
From: AslanJ

Jim and Jayne - I have a Q for you:
Have y'all heard of the Roswell, GA episode of the women taken from the cotton mills by train to the north and left, deserted? I just heard about it this past week at the library, from a lady who is studying to be a tour guide. I didn't have time to search it out, but she told me that she had read an article about it. 
Seems that northern troops were going through Roswell and burning down the cotton mills along the way. Some women who were working at the big mill there in Roswell were taken and put on a train. Someone had tried to track down the women and their descendants. Apparently they were left on their own in a big northern town. Did you ever hear about this?
Judy Canant

{{Judy}} got some feedbacks...
*******
From: CMBarker
Jimmy, 
I've read this story...I think they were taken to Cleveland, Ohio. I'll check it out when I get a chance..there was a story in CW Times I think. 
Mark
*******
From: Dinahme
Hello, you mentioned something about the Roswell Women. That is very true. A article appeared in the January issue of the United Daughters of the Confederacy magazine. It is very interesting. Also the article was written by the United Daughters of the Confederacy Georgia Division's Historian. She is very through and writes some fantastic articles.
Thanks for all you all do., you sure do a wonderful job. Enjoy ever bit of it.
Deanna R. Bryant
*************************************************************************************

From: BruNet3333
Hi,
JimmA gave me your screen names because I am doing civil war genealogy. I am currently reading up on the B&O Railroad because I found that the connection between Baltimore and Berryville, Va (where my ancestors lived for a while) was the B&O railroad. I have learned that Stonewall Jackson loved to blow up the railroad bridge at Harper's Ferry. We think we found our ancestor, William C. Wilson in the 2ndVa Infantry -- which fought under Jackson...he might have helped to demolish the railroad line. 

I have been reading about the man responsible for repairs on the B&O line -- a man named John L. Wilson...hopefully I will find he is another ancestor. My research is kind of stuck in the civil war, so I guess what I am asking is where to try to get more information? My mom used the information I found and received the file on this soldier from the National Archives. 

Is there any place that can give me information on Chimborazo Hospital in Richmond, where my ancestor was put? I have contacted the National Archives on this one, but wonder if Virginia has records on that. Anything you can tell me would help.
Joanne

{{{{Joanne}}}} You have been busy and looks like relatively successful in your research. First the Railroad distruction by Jackson’s command. Jackson’s army frequently devastated Orange and Alexandria line anywhere he could. You may find some reference to their activities during the Cedar Mountain conflict as well. That was the battle that Gen. Pope recalled Herman Haupt, the Civil Engineering cantankerous genius of the Northern Railroads appointed by Lincoln via Staunton.... I would try books on Haupt, Jackson and Cedar Mountain.. Maybe just posting this will get us a response. I sent some limited material on Chimborazo to you already. However I would try the Richmond Libraries or the Historical Society of Richmond about the Chimborazo hospital. Also, we might get some hits from the membership.
************************************************************************************
From: GLITZ01
Have you ever heard of the "BUTTERMILK RANGERS" that served in the Civil war. John Myrick 
Montgomery was supposed to have served in this unit and it was probably a rifle unit. Shirley

{{{Shirley}}} My research struck out on any unit named "Buttermilk Rangers". I discovered many units 
called rangers but only one (so far) that were called rifle rangers and that was the "Rifle Rangers of 
Florida" mentioned in a report from Col. D.H. Hill to Robert E. Lee from Yorktown, VA in Jun of 1861. 
If you have any more information, Please send. In the mean time HAVE ANY OF YOU UNIT EXPERTS 
OUT THERE HEARD OF UNIT ABOVE??????
*************************************************************************************
FEELING OLD
From: TUBES14

Just in case you weren't feeling too old today, this will
certainly change things. Each year the staff at Beloit College
in Wisconsin puts together a list to try to give the faculty a
sense of the mindset of that year's incoming freshmen. Here is
this year's list:

1. The people who are starting college this fall across the nation were born in 1980.
2. They have no meaningful recollection of the Reagan Era and did not know he had ever been shot.
3. They were prepubescent when the Persian Gulf War was waged.
4. Black Monday 1987 is as significant to them as the Great Depression.
5. There has been only one Pope. They can only really remember one president.
6. There were 11 when the Soviet Union broke apart and do not remember the Cold War.
7. They have never feared a nuclear war. "The Day After" is a pill to them, not a movie.
8. They are too young to remember the space shuttle blowing up,
9. Tianamen Square means nothing to them.
10. Their lifetime has always included AIDS.
11. Bottle caps have always been screw off and plastic 
12. Atari pre-dates them, as do vinyl albums.
13. The expression "you sound like a broken record" means nothing to them.
14. They have never owned a record player.
15. They have likely never played Pac Man and have never heard of Pong.
16. Star Wars look very fake to them, and the special effects are pathetic.
17. There have always been red M&M's and blue ones are not new. There used to be beige ones?
18. They may have heard of an 8 track, but probably never have actually seen or heard one.
19. The Compact Disc was introduced when they were 1 year old.
20. As far as they know, stamps have always cost about 32 cents.
21. They have always had an answering machine.
22. Most have never seen a TV set with only 13 channels, nor have they seen a black-and-white TV.
23. They have always had cable.
24. There have always been VCR's, but they have no idea what BETA is.
5. They cannot fathom not having a remote control.
26. They were born the year that Walkmen were introduced by Sony.
27. Roller-skating has always meant inline for them.
28. The Tonight Show has always been with Jay Leno.
29. They have no idea when or why Jordache jeans were cool.
30. Popcorn has always been cooked in the microwave.
31. They have never seen Larry Bird play, and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is a football player.
32. They never took a swim and thought about Jaws.
33. The Vietnam War is as ancient history to them as WWI, WWII or even the Civil War.
34. They have no idea that Americans were ever held hostage in Iran.
35. They can't imagine what hard contact lenses are.
36. They don't know who Mork was or where he was from.
37. They never heard: "Where's the beef?", "I'd walk a mile for a Camel," or "de plane, de plane!"
38. They do not care who shot J.R. and have no idea who J.R. is.
39. The Titanic was found? I thought we always knew where it was.
40. Michael Jackson has always been white.
41. Kansas, Chicago, Boston, America, and Alabama are places, not groups.
42. McDonald's never came in Styrofoam containers.
43. There has always been MTV
Do you feel old yet?

{{Tom}} LOL For Crying out Loud!!! YESSSSSSS That means they’ve never seen a Hippie, nor heard Tip Toe Through the Tulips, or seen Chubby Checker do “The Twist” or know what a Sock Hop is...... Annnd they don’t have a clue what a Hootenany was. The Beach Boys, the Righteous Brothers, Simeon and Garfunkel, Joan Baez, Peter Paul and Mary, Tommy and Dickie Smothers, “Laugh-In”. Oh my..
*************************************************************************************
From: FAD33

Jim, I cannot remember if I have passed this information to you. The only record available for CSA soldiers who died at Vicksburg in 1863 is a list an elderly friend of mine made from the local funeral home records. Elizabeth C. Taylor worked at the Old Court House Museum in Vicksburg at the time. In about 1960, Fisher Funeral Home brought in several old registers and asked if the museum wanted them. They were going to throw them out. Elizabeth looked at them and realized how valuable they were. She began a laborious task, in the days of no computers, of typing the names of the Confederate soldiers who died in hospitals from the beginning of Sherman's campaign in December 1862 at Chickasaw Bayou through the surrender on July 4, 1863. She reworked the list several times, alphabetizing, then dividing the names by states. In about 1982, the local UDC chapter used her list to secure headstones for the dead from the War Department. A retired engineer from Clinton, MS, along with two Vicksburg city employees, laid out and erected the headstones at Soldiers Rest where so many Confederates lay in mass graves in the City Cemetery. A ceremony honoring Elizabeth and the engineer and his helpers on Confederate Memorial Day was a high point in my spinster friend's life. Unfortunately, someone from Texas took her list and began to sell it as if it were her own work. Of course, Elizabeth never copyrighted her work. It never occurred to her that someone would try to take her work and make money off of it! She is in her late 80's now and lives in a nursing home in Port Gibson, still talking to anyone who will listen about the Civil War. She never went to college but did the work which was the equivalent of a PhD thesis, in my opinion!

If anyone is interested in checking the list of names of the known Confederate dead at Vicksburg, write to Gordon Cotton, The Old Court House Museum, Vicksburg, MS 39180.
I always enjoy the Fireside. Thanks for keeping me on the mailing list.
Frances Ann Dornbusch

{{{Frances}}} If you did, I certainly don’t remember it. This is great information. Thank you.
*************************************************************************************
*************************************************************************************
WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate 
one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; 
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, 
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on 
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly 
Fireside." 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from 
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- 
haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFS Jayne, GFH TEG 
and GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :) 

2/25/99 - "Gettysburg Night - Part II - stories and tales collected over the years by GFH TEG (our own 
Tom :-)) You'll notice this is Part II and therefore a continuation of Tom's collection. 

3/4/99 - OPEN CHAT

3/11/99 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send in any that you would like shared.... 
These are great evenings. These are indeed special evenings.

3/18/99 - OPEN CHAT

3/25/99 - "Gettysburg Night - Part III - stories and tales collected over the years by GFH TEG (our own 
Tom :-)) Yes, there are more :)

.............and that take's us to the end of the month of March.

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne, GFH TEG and GFS Jim

Hear Ye ..............Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 28 February 1999

OH MY!! What a wonderful night Thursday night was. . Not only was it the Gettysburg Series - Part 2, but Tom got his promotion and arrived wearing his new GFS TEG "hat"!!! CONGRATULATIONS LIL' BROTHER {{{{{}}}}} Please make a note of the change should you want to email him.

WOW... did you all notice just how many we had in the room this week for Gettysburg night!!!!!! We hit the 36 mark several times. We had many new ones who came and listened then left without "saying" anything so we've put them on the distribution.

Jim was right last week when he said I was "going into Internet Depravation. !!" I was worried to death my puter wouldn't be fixed by Thursday night. Silly I know, but I've been in the room now every Thurs night for nearly two years, plus I knew Tom had gotten his promotion AND it was Gettysburg night!!!!!!! Now how do you miss all of that...!!!!!??? Fortunately I didn't have to. My biggest surprise came Friday when our brand new puter arrived nearly a week early!!!!! What a week this has been!!!!!

*********************************************************
Subj: A tribute to the GFS's
written by MBram10513

You all are very patient.
You all understand.
Your hearts are warm and caring.
You have room for everyone.
Sometimes you are serious,
but cut loose at times.
You have answers to our questions.
You have wisdom so we listen.
I guess thats why ya'll are my best friends.

{{{{{{{{{{Jennie}}}}}}}}}} Jim, Tom and I thank you for your poem. We do what we do because of people like you, especially ones of your age. Your enthusiasm for learning is contagious. You join us anytime you can...

**************
This Thursday is Open Chat. Come on out and join us. This is the perfect night to ask all those questions that have gone unanswered.
**************
FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE REALLY ENJOYED HAVING
YOU :-)..... COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY....

*************************************************************************************

NOTE: The following is just one of the stories Tom will be sharing with us later this year... stay tuned d:)

PICTURE PERFECT
by Tom Gladwell

Although infrequent, no one can predict when or where they will have a supernatural phenomenon. For many, however, if they stay in Gettysburg long enough, they can almost be assured of having an unexplainable experience. One place people have reported getting strange feelings is the picturesque Sachs Mill covered-bridge, built in 1852, one mile west of the Eisenhower Farm. Many people find their way to this beautiful part of the countryside to view part of this country's wonderful and scenic past of a forgotten era.

Beth, like many others, drove to that part of the scenic valley to enjoy the landscape and simultaneously, photograph the old bridge. She arrived there on a beautiful summer day, perfect in every way, parked her car and began walking toward the bridge. Beth leisurely strolled around the area from time to time to snap a picture of the quaint surroundings. As the young woman walked across the majestic bridge, she wondered how many soldiers crossed it during the terrible Battle of Gettysburg. Beth was acquainted with the history of the battle and could not help but reflect on that troubled time of our nation. She went from a relaxed frame of mind, to one of sorrow, as she stood on that old bridge. Not understanding why her feelings changed so suddenly, Beth continued walking across the bridge toward the east end, now trying to forget the disturbing past. What began as a pleasant sightseeing trip soon turned into one of confusion for the bewildered woman. No matter how hard she tried, Beth could not stop thinking about the gruesome battle.

She finished crossing the covered-bridge walking only a short distance when, for no apparent reason, the warm summer air suddenly changed to an ice-cold place. Accompanied by the cold, Beth felt the strange feeling so many experienced on the battle of Gettysburg. Beth knew something out of the ordinary was occurring and forced herself to move from that spot. After a few yards, the temperature returned to the normal warmth she felt previously, and was convinced she was the object of a paranormal event. Beth, who is rarely at a loss for words, could not come up with any description of what just happened to her. Having had enough excitement, she immediately left the place, returning to town to find answers.

She asked many people if they ever heard of, or experienced, the ice-cold spot near the covered-bridge. She found out that she was not alone, others had the same incidents in the same place. Beth also learned that a legend exists stemming from the time of the battle. It seems that, near the bridge, an old oak tree once stood and on its limbs, were hung several Confederate soldiers, accused of desertion. They have said that the spirits of those unfortunates still linger in that very spot, marked by the unearthly cold surrounding the place of their execution.

{{{{{Tom}}}}} Thank you for allowing me to share this story with everyone.

********************

THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files".
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the
New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting
Logs and Newsletters".

*****************************************************************************
NOTE:... last week Jim posted a note regarding the following Andersonville lookup offer from Kevin Frye. Kevin has so graciously given us permission to print his address... Be "gentle" folks... and please... be sure to be as generous with your "donation" as Kevin is being with his time. d:) Excerpt from Kevin's previous note... [...have taken photos for people who sent me request, and mailed them for what small donation they are willing to send to cover my cost as well as my donation to the Museum] AND Folks.... be sure to check out the website Kevin has listed in his note BEFORE you contact him. What you need might be there.

Andersonville lookups
From: frye@gnat.net (FRYE FAMILY)

Hi Jim,
Please include my offer to do lookups and take pics at Andersonville in the Fireside " Chats". My offer has spread like wildfire and surprisingly, I am keeping up with the request pretty well. Most of my responses get answered in a few days and Im getting to Andersonville to take pics every week or two. If you could include the online Andersonville page so researchers can attempt to look up the info on their own, that would help speed things up. If researchers come up empty but have records that their ancesters were there, I have a CD and can cross check names by alphabet to check other spellings of the names. The online address is.....
<< http://www.corinthian.net/mccc/plookup.htm >>

I also have an address and contact at the Andersonville Muesum so that if
their Ancestors are not listed and they do have documents, I will send the
info on request.

Thank you so much and good hunting...

Kevin Frye
Butler Georgia

{{{{{Kevin}}}}} We thank you for your generous offer and we hope the membership doesn't inundate you.

*********************************************************************************

From: Jimcone252

Hello to all:
I am a newcomer to the group and for the past several weeks, I
have read your news articles and other types of articles with great interest.
I am the great-grandson of a Confederate Navy Veteran who was aboard the
Gun Boat Spray that protected the St. Marks River, just South of Tallahassee
Fla. They kept the Union Navy from landing Soldiers at the strategic points
in an effort to capture the State Capitol. When that effort failed, they landed
approximately 5,000 Union Soldiers on the East Bank of the St. Marks River
and made an effort to cross at Natural Bridge. This effort failed when the
CSA managed to raise a mere 500 young cadets, a few seasoned soldiers
and many infirm who were in the hospital at Tallahassee. The Union suffered
losses of 2,000 of their men while the CSA lost only 5. Of these five, one of
them was a relative of my family.
If anyone can add to this story, I would certainly love to discuss this with you.
I can only add, if the determination and bravery of these 500 men were
consistent throughout the war, things would definitely turned out different
than they did.
By the way, the ole Spray did her duty to keep the big boys from coming
up the St. Marks and the State Capitol at Tallahassee was the only Capitol
East of the Mississippi that was not captured! Bravo!

{{{{Jim}}}} We're just tickled to death to have you "on board". We're posting your note here in the Fireside in hopes that there will be someone out there who can help you.

*********************************************************************************

From: RussMc1958

Jim, thanks for reminding me about tomorrow night. I will be there with bells on if my computer don't crash on me. I have been down 18 out of the last 24 days and found out that my tracker mouse software had a virus in it. Had to format the hard drive.
Anyway, glad to hear from you. My dear wife was at school last week and because she is a teachers assistant got a good deal on a great book that she bought me for Valentines Day...."1,400 Days" by Chris Bishop. Great book giving a day by day account of the war. Reading that was a great way for me to occupy my time while the confusser was down. See ya Thursday.....Russ McClelland

{{{{{Russ}}}}} Thanks for the tip on the book. It sure beats a box of candy!!!!

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From: EMMIESMA

HI... MY NAME IS NANCE AND I'M A REENACTOR FROM STATEN ISLAND, NY. I AM WITH THE 14TH BROOKLYN NYS MILITIA. I'M VERY INTERESTED IN RECEIVING THE WEEKLY FIRESIDE AND I'D LOVE TO JOIN YOUR CHAT ALSO. PLEASE SEND ME LINK TO CHATROOM AND PUT ME ON YOUR MAILING LIST.

THANK YOU SO MUCH,


{{{{{Nance}}}}} Welcome aboard!!!! Our GFS TEG is a member of the 14th Brooklyn also...

*********************************************************************************

From: TDonoho528

please put me on weekly fireside list. i am rarely available on thurs. my cousin has been sending copies o fireside and i am fascinated. jerry donoho

{{{{{Jerry}}}}} You're on the distribution list!!!!!! Some Thurs night when you do find yourself available, stop in to see us, we'll be looking for ya!!!

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The following was sent to us by SusiCP
via the OLD-FREDERICK-CO-VA-L@rootsweb.com list

Civil War Site-Hampshire Co. VA
I found a great site today that lists almost an entire unit from Hampshire
Co. and what happened to them, including where some are buried. This site
can be viewed at:
www.civil-war.net/ Scroll down to 33rd VA Volunteer Infantry and
click...then on the screen telling about the unit, click on the Roster of
Names. There are LOTS of names I have seen people searching for on this
list.

Sharon B.

{{{{{Sharon}}}}} Thanks for the great tip.

*********************************************************************************

MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!.........................................................

Well here it is! In response to overwhelming number of emails indicating this to be a great idea, we have
responded in kind..... Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or
battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will
post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near vicinity, and are willing to assist
can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and work out the details. We recommend the "Requestor"
pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free"
assistance between members. Do unto others as........ you know :-) Keep me posted on how this is
working!!!!
GFS Jim
***********************************************
PICTURES OF THE GRAVESITE OF Edwin Nichols at the New Hope Battfield Cemetery are requested
by Lkiwki@aol.com ..... If anyone can assist in this, please email this member direct and work out any
details or additional information. Lynne, if you hit paydirt, let me know and I'll remove this posting.

The New Hope Battlefield is just off (North ?) of US Hwy 278 about 25 miles northwest of Atlanta,
Georgia. Towns close or fairly close are Dallas, New Hope, Kennesaw, Braswell, Marietta.
##########################
From: Wmdperkins
In connection with the Civil War Newsletter I am requesting assistance with the following:
On the Stone there reads the following:

Daniel RUGGLES
1/1810 - 6/2/1897
Lt. Col., USA
Maj. Gen., CSA

Edward S. RUGGLES
7/10/1843 - 3/1/1919
Maj., USA ......................(is this an error????)

Richardetta Mason HOOE
11/19/1821 - 1/4/1904

The gravesite is in the Confederate Cemetery, Fredricksburg, Va., corner of Amelia St., and
Washington St., north of the entrance road, stone is said to be "quite handsome". This is listed in
"Tombstone Inscriptions of Spotsylvania Co., Va." written by Margaret C. Klein, printed Palm Coast,
Fla., 1893. The text is stored in the NC State Archives, Raleigh, NC.
I am interested in any corrections to what is written on the stone as another source has son as a
Maj., CSA. Also, what other data the cemetery might have, and, of course, a picture of the stone would be
greatly appreciated. I have 1870, 80, and 1900 Fredricksburg, Va., census info on Daniel and
Richardetta, she a US pensioner in 1900.
Thank you for your efforts - Bill Perkins

"Bill" we'll put this out in the Newsletter and see what the readers will say...... :-)
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Subj: Locating a grave..
From: Scotlinda

I would be interested in getting a picture of the grave of my husband's gg grandfather, ROBERT
SYLVESTER, he served with the 15th Infantry Regiment Company E from NJ. The information I have is
that he is buried in the National Cemetery in Fredricksburg, VA. Division B, Section D, Grave 306. He
died December 5, 1862, of typhoid fever shortly after mustering in on August 25th, 1862.
Thanks so much for any help..of course I will pay costs for film and mailing.
Carolee Logan

{{{Carolee}}} We'll put it up and see what hits we get....
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Subj: 35th GAR
From: SkipLane@compuserve.com (Myra E. Lane)

Hello Jim:

Ike Watrous recommended that I pose the following question to your
knowledgeable Chat Room:

Can anyone help me to identify the following gentleman whose name could be
Gould, Vreeland or Post from New Jersey.

In a wonderful old photo, this uniformed gentleman wears a large brimmed
hat with an emblem comprised of laurel branches encircling 3 letters, the
central one could be an 'A,' with the number '35' at the top. Near the left
pocket of his single breasted jacket is a star-shaped medal suspended from
a (striped?) ribbon attached to an eagle at the top. He also wears what
looks like a braided mourning band on his left arm and holds a dark colored
cane topped with a white handle. The collar of his uniform is hidden by his
long beard but the top button is high on his chest suggesting the coat has
no lapels. The coat has 3 metal buttons over a vest with 6 smaller medal
buttons visible.

He most likely came from the Newfoundland-West Milford area of northern New
Jersey for his photo was among those in an album of these families dating
from between 1860-1910. I am more than willing to share a .gif image with
anyone who would be interested. My objective is to place the original photo
with a legitimate descendant of this man once identified or an interested
organization unless I find he is my own ancestor.

Any help your group can provide will be greatly appreciated.

Kind regards,
Myra Vreeland Lane

{{{{{Myra}}}}} We have about 850 on our distribution... hopefully one of them can help you.
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From: CADaubs

I would like information on the Daughters of the Confederacy. I am just completing my paperwork for the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, but have my lineage traced further back.

What is "Daughters of the Confederacy"....

Also....I would love to have photos of tombstones in the area of Carthage, NC. I would be more than happy to pay for the assistance.

Thanks,

Cheryl A. Daubs

{{{{{Cheryl}}}}} Maybe you'll get some results from the faithful re the photos you're requesting

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DID YOU KNOW?? ...................................

GFS MAINE (the illustrious host of the Maine Chat Room) sends us this warning!

New Disease Found! Important information
Doctors have discovered a new disease that is very contagious to adults.
They have named it Genealogy Pox.

SYMPTOMS: Patient continually complains of a need for names, dates, and
places. Patient has a blank expression on his face, and often seems deaf to
mate and children. Has no taste for work of any kind, except for feverishly
looking through records, libraries, and courthouse. Has Compulsion to write
letters and spends hours sitting at a computer. Swears at mailman when he
doesn't leave mail or threatens to kick computer if there is no e-mail.
Frequents strange places such as cemeteries, ruins and remote desolate
country areas. Makes secret night calls and hides the phone bills from mate.
Patient mumbles to self and has a strange faraway look in his eyes. Has a
strange compulsion to gather and scatter old papers all over the house,
leaving piles of paper everywhere with strange numbers and names all over
them.

TREATMENT: No known cure. Medication is useless. Disease is not fatal, but
gets progressively worse. Disease is spreading throughout the country very
fast, quickly becoming an epidemic. Patient should attend genealogy
meetings, workshops, subscribe to genealogical magazines, and be given lots
more forms and a computer situated in a quiet corner of the house where he
or she can be alone. If family supports patient through this, patient will
occasionally come out of strange trance and will act normal again unless you
drive by a cemetery or courthouse.

REMARKS: The unusual nature of this disease is such that the more sick the
patient becomes, the more he or she seems to enjoy it sometimes dancing with
glee and yelling, "I found it!"

{{{{{George}}}}}} Now we all know what's wrong with us!!!!!!

************************************************************************************
A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of
Interest and Pleas for HELP................
************************************************************************************

From: GLITZ01
Have you ever heard of the "BUTTERMILK RANGERS" that served in the Civil war. John Myrick
Montgomery was supposed to have served in this unit and it was probably a rifle unit. Shirley

{{{Shirley}}} We'll leave this in for another week... let us know if you've gotten any more information. In the mean time HAVE ANY OF YOU UNIT EXPERTS
OUT THERE HEARD OF UNIT ABOVE??????
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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT………….

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War".

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died
because of.

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate
one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit;
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events,
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly
Fireside."

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste-
haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events******

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFS Jim, GFS TEG
and GFS Jayne and our many faithful friends :)

3/4/99 - OPEN CHAT

3/11/99 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send in any that you would like shared....
These are great evenings. These are indeed special evenings.

3/18/99 - OPEN CHAT

3/25/99 - "Gettysburg Night - Part III - stories and tales collected over the years by GFS TEG (our own
Tom :-)) Yes, there are more :)

.............and that take's us to the end of the month of March.

We'll See You Thursday Night……….!
Your Hosts
GFS Jim, GFS TEG and GFS Jayne

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