APRIL WEEKLY FIRESIDE NEWSLETTERS

Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 04 April 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line.  

NOTE from Jayne:  We're getting more subscribers all the time, and  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had recently.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter.

Please be assured your email addresses are not shared with, nor sold to, anyone else.

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NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
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Last week we had open chat Thursday and Friday nights.  A good time was had by all.  We managed to find some info on a couple of soldiers for folks.  

I was putting some info into my Family Tree Maker this morning and realized today is 04/04/04!!!!

While this has nothing to do with the Civil War, I just have to tell you all, if you ever get to the Washington, DC area, you might want to visit The National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center near the Dulles Airport in Chantilly, VA.  The Center opened in December 2003.  They are planning even more exhibits for the Center than what's already there.   To mention just a few:  an Air France Concorde, the B-29 Superfortress Enola Gay, the Space Shuttle Enterprise (my favorite exhibit) which was the first space shuttle and was used as a test vehicle.  It was not designed to operate in the atmosphere and it doesn't have engines, but otherwise it is exactly like the shuttle that have been launched.  My second favorite was the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird. There are also engines, missles of all kinds, gunnery, uniforms....  and much, much more.   Go visit.....    you won't be disappointed.

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MUSIC
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If you have some favorite music, tell us a little about it and we'll put it here in the newsletter.

FROM:  An Madra Rua

Here is the website for Charlie Zahm . He has 15 CD's out and an enormous following of  devoted fans. One of my favorite CD's is  "Americana" which features songs from both the Revolutionary War and the Civil War

My apologies to An Madra Rua and Charlie Zahm for omitting the URL for the website  :(    So, I'm going to leave this in again this week.  

http://www.charliezahm.com/ 

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.  

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to.  

Also on Thursday 8-9PM ET: Trace Your Civil War Ancestors in Ancestral Digs. (on AOL only) Join HOST FMLY Wolfrd to discuss ancestral searches from the Civil War period

You can visit the other Genealogy chats by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at   Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

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"THE BOOK SHELF"
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.   

* * * * * * * * * * 

http://www.roberteleecwrt.org/reviews.html 
http://www.cwbr.com/ 

Check out some book reviews at the above websites.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs, 
and Poems evenings)
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This week's reading came from the Nova Scotia list via Wmdperkins .  Most of us who are interested in genealogy as well as the Civil War.  This is perfect for what we all do.  

THE STORY TELLERS.....  author unknown

We are the chosen.  My feelings are, in each family there is one who seems called to find the ancestors.  To put flesh on their bones and make them live again, to tell the family story and to feel that somehow they know, and approve.  To me, doing genealogy is not a cold gathering of facts but, instead, breathing life into all who have gone before.  We are the story tellers of the tribe.

All tribes have one.  We have been called as it were, by our genes.  Those who have gone before cry out to us:  Tell our story.  So, we do.  In finding them, we somehow find ourselves.  How many graves have I stood before now and cried?  I have lost count.  How many times have I told the ancestors you have a wonderful family you would be proud of us?  How many times have I walked up to a grave and felt somehow there was love there for me?  I cannot say.  It goes beyond just documenting facts.  It goes to who am I and why do I do the things I do?  It goes to seeing a cemetery about to be lost forever to weeds and indifference and saying I can't let this happen.  The bones here are bones of my bone and flesh of my flesh.  It goes to doing something about it.  It goes to pride in what our ancestors were able to accomplish. How they contributed to what we are today.  It goes to respecting their hardships and losses, their never giving in or giving up, their resoluteness to go on and build a life for their family.  It goes to deep pride that they fought to make and keep us a Nation.

It goes to a deep and immense understanding that they were doing it for us. That we might be born who we are.  That we might remember them.  So we do.  With love and caring and scribing each fact of their existence, because we are them and they are us.  So, as a scribe called, I tell the story of my family.   It is up to that one called in the next generation to answer the call and take their place in the long line of family storytellers.  That, is why I do my family genealogy, and that is what calls those young and old to step up and put flesh on the bones.

Borrowed from the Beattie Project Newsletter
Author Unknown

(((((Wm)))))   Thanks for sending this along....  

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DID YOU KNOW?
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The following came from JennaJLR.  She thought you all might be interested.
Thanks (((((Jenna))))   :D 

Southern Claims Commission Disallowed Claims, 1871-1880
(National Archives Microfiche Publication M1407, RG 233)
Timothy Dougherty

Southern Claims Commission Disallowed Claims is an engaging and useful
tool for American Civil War era research. This collection may help flesh
out a family history. It may enable a researcher to establish 
connections with neighbors,  relatives, ex-slaves, and ex-slave owners.
The contents may note an ancestor's  occupation and standing in the
community, or may help discover a missing link. And often, they provide
an ancestor's first-hand account of the times. This collection is
available in our Microtext area.

In 1871, Congress established  a commission to receive and examine
monetary claims for Civil War losses. These claims were based on the
facts that the claimant had been both loyal to the Union  and had
supplies or stores seized by or furnished to the US Army during the war.
States affected in the commission were AL, AR, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, SC,
TN, TX, VA and parts of WV. This collection includes just the claims
that were wholly "disallowed ," or  ultimately never paid out, and
claims that were "barred,"  that is,  failed  to make the March 10, 1880
deadline. 

The claims contain varying degrees of information. Some have merely a
card with a few hastily scrawled  notes.  Many others, however,  include
pages of  documents—lists detailing the claim and depositions by both
claimants and  witnesses. The nature of the claims is also varied; they
include property, stores and supplies—damaged houses, flatboats,
potatoes, pork, crockery, and fodder, for example. The claim treats the
specifics and  itemizes the losses. The depositions  may detail
claimant's age,  birthplace, specific location, and circumstances
regarding  the claim. They may reveal, in his or her own words,  what
the claimant felt and witnessed during the war. These provide a
fascinating glimpse into the claimant's life and surroundings.       

This collection includes a comprehensive, easy-to-use index.

These claims can be utilized with a separate National Archives
publication,  Records of the House of Representatives: Southern Claims
Commission, 1871-1880 ( P-2257). This includes the Summary Reports of
the Commissioners of Claims. It is strongly recommended that the reports
be checked in addition to the Disallowed Claims, as  it includes
material not found in the claim itself. It contains the commissioners' 
reasons for disallowing the claim, and may include additional personal
data. Each wholly disallowed claim should  have such an entry. Also
included in the Summary Reports are statistical analysis, overall
observations, and the "rules" concerning the claims.

...............and there you have it.

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THE HELP DESK
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Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom??  
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if 
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

Folks, this is YOUR place to ask questions...  
please feel free to use it...  send them to
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I received the following from Alf B Hill@AOL.com  They appeared on one of the maillists he belongs to and he thought maybe the faithful might be able to help.  If you have any answer to either of the queries, send them to Alf and he can post them on the Maillist.  

#1   
Does anyone on the list have or have knowledge of any photos taken of the Washington Co. members of Company D., 79th PA?  I have never seen a picture of my g,grandfather William Barringer who was a member of Co. D, 79th PA Cavalry.  His two brothers, John and George were foot soldiers of Co. D, 79th PA.  I have a newspaper clipping of John at a GAR meeting; however, I was hoping that there might be a group photo somewhere that might include William.

Incidentally, all three Barringer brothers survived the Civil War as did the three Worrell brothers, Nathaniel, Hiram and William H. What were the chances of that happening in such a devastating conflict.?.

Thank you,
Marilyn of Lake Co., IL

#2 
I have been searching for a picture of the 140th PA infantry during the civil war. I have one individual picture of Cephas Dodd Sharp. He and 3 of his brothers all served in the 140th. William Woolverton Sharp was a Surgeon, Manean and Isaac were both Sgt.s  Cephas is the only one that did not make it home. He was killed at Gettsburg along with his sister's husband, James Alexander Bebout. I would give anything to find a picture of these mentioned,  all gguncles of my father, Homer Littleton Sharp who died in 1948. A wonderful cousin sent me the picture of Cephas Dodd Sharp in his uniform. I have found no others. Ira Sharp Dennis

The 140th Pa infantry during the Civil War was one of most distinguished regiments in the Union army and included five companies from Washinton County. From the history of Washington County, PA...Beers

Put on your thinking caps and let's see if we can help either of these two people out.  

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If lawyers are disbarred and clergymen defrocked, doesn't it follow that electricians can be delighted, musicians denoted, cowboys deranged, models deposed, tree surgeons debarked, and dry cleaners depressed?

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Weekly Web Sites we've received 
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If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

From:   Bitsobluengray@aol.com

Samuel P. Bates - Martial Deeds of Pennsylvania - USGenWeb Pennsylvania Archives
http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/pa/1pa/1picts/bates/mdeedspa.htm


The War of the Rebellion in Cornell University's Making of America
http://moa.cit.cornell.edu/moa/browse.monographs/waro.html 

~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Cyndislist

URL:     http://www.rootdig.com/u_s_grant.html
TITLE:     U S Grant in U S Federal Census Records
DESCRIPTION:     This site contains links to federal census images of 
Ulysses S Grant in 1850-1880 census records.

=~=~=~=
URL:     http://www.43rdga.org
TITLE:     43rd Georgia Infantry Regiment Volunteer
DESCRIPTION:     History site for the 43rd Georgia Civil War Regiment.

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FROM OUR READERS
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If your ancestor has or you have a story to tell, please send it to us.  
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill   
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com   

We received another email from Pinkpj this week and I've enclosed it here.  It's nice to hear we're doing something right.   :)

From Pinkpj622

I love reading the letter.  Sometimes it takes me a day or to, to get to it but I read every word.  I especial loved the John Randan letters in this Fireside letter.
IM going in for surgery tomorrow the first one ever.  For an old granny that's pretty good. Once IM feeling better I do hope to get more active with this group. Whenever I had gone to the genealogy chat rooms I have found such lovely people.

Keep up the good work.
Most sincerely.

(((((((Eleanor))))))))  Prayers for a speediy recovery coming your way from all of the "Faithful"  :)   When you're feeling better, come on in and visit... we'll leave the light on for ya
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Last week in the Did you know section of the newsletter I had put:  

Did you know that when a child died in the Victorian era, its parents would 
have a photograph taken of it? They wanted to preserve its memory for as 
long as possible. A lot of pictures of sleeping children are actually of dead 
children. Parents would also pose with their deceased little ones in one last 
family picture.

I received this reply from Snow Beri:

True.  You also might want to add in your next newsletter that family or individual photographs were not taken too often during this era because of cost and involvement that was associated with it.  So if a child died, the family used that occasion to take a photograph, especially if one had not been taken before this time.
 
Regards,
Diane
Ancestors in the Indiana, Kentucky and New York regiments

((((Diane))))), thanks for the infomation :)  
PS....   tell Dan I said Hi  ;)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
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GoldHobo@aol.com has told us if anyone wants info the the 85th NY Inf. Regt. (Plymouth Pilgrims) you may email her.  She has a book about them.    Her one request is that you put 85th Regt. in the subject line so she doesn't delete it by mistake

JLawson656@aol.com has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email. 

GandMS@aol.com  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you. 

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin/frye@gnat.net  does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html 

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com  Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

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"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
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If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html

April 12 - 17  South Carolina Special events in Charleston surrounding the burial of the crew of the CSS Hunley, the Confederate submarine recovered in 2000. Events include living history, lectures, musical performances, artillery demonstrations, presentation of facial reconstructions of the Hunley crew and programs at the site of the conservation of the submarine. Funeral-related events include visitations, laying in state and the April 17 burial at Magnolia Cemetery. Large crowds are expected. For current list of events and times, see www.hunley.org 

April 17, Delaware Hagley Museum's Civil War Family Day  10 AM to 4 PM   For more information to http://www.hagley.lib.de.us/event-civil.html 

April  24  Maryland  Special program, "Music of the Civil War," performances and discussion of the life and duties of Civil War musicians at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. 11 am-3 pm. Free with admission. 301-695-1864 or www.civilwarmed.org 

April 24 - 25  Pennsylvania  Neshaminy Park Civil War Reenactment 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.  215-639-4538  For more information email neshaminysp@state.pa.us or contact: Russ Manning 215-920-2321 archducrj1@aol.com
Activities are open to the public Saturday and Sunday. In addition to the daily `Battles` there will be a host of Civil War programs throughout the day. 

April 24 - 25  Pennsylvania  Living history encampment and demonstrations by the US Sharpshooters at Little Round Top in the Gettysburg National Military Park. www.nps.gov/gett   

April 30 - May 2 Virginia  Battle of the Wilderness, 140th anniversary activities. Ellwood open 11 am-4:30 pm Friday and 11 am-5 pm during weekend. National Park plans activities. Check www.nps.gov/frsp for the latest information. 

April 30 - May 2 Texas  Battle of Port Jefferson in Historic Jefferson, Texas
http://www.jefferson-texas.com/battle.htm

May 1 West Virginia   Living history hike to Maryland Heights at the Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. See the strategic spot that commanded the town and the area. More info: www.nps.gov/hafe  

May 7 - 9  Reenactment, Battle of Spotsylvania 140th anniversary event in Spotsylvania County near Fredericksburg. Demonstrations and living history all weekend. Camps open 1 pm Friday, 10 am Saturday and before dawn Sunday. Battles at 6:30 pm Saturday, before dawn and 11 am Sunday. Candlelight tour Saturday night. Fee charged. http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/news.html#SpotsylvaniaSchedule 
Details and updates: www.spotsylvania140th.com 

September 3 - 5, 2004 New Jersey.....  Battle of Cedar Bridge, Lake Manahawkin, NJ     Last Battle of the American War of Independence
http://www.telecottage.com/staffordhist/cedarbridge.html 

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Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
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Time:   
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

April 8 & 9, 2004  -  Our special Songs letters and poems nights.  If you would like to share something sent from your ancestor during the war, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne@aol.com and HOST FMLY Bill@aol.com

April 15 & 16, 2004 - OPEN CHAT

April 22 & 23, 2004 - Since there are five Thursdays and Fridays in the month, I'm going to make this week OPEN CHAT and then have a special program next week.

April 29 & 30, 2004 -  On the Homefront during the Civil War.  How do you suppose your ancestors family made out during the war while their husbands, sons, fathers, brothers were away in the war.  Who took care of the farms?  

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night.  

Jayne & Bill  :)

Civil War Weekly Fireside Newsletter
http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/weekly_fireside_newsletter_archive.htm

Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 11 April 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line.  

NOTE from Jayne:  We're getting more subscribers all the time, and  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had recently.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter. 

Please be assured your email addresses are not shared with, nor sold to, anyone else.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

This past Thursday and Friday nights were our Songs, letters and Poems nites.  Thursday we read a few really great poems and letters but Friday night, we didn't get any read....   The conversations were so great we didn't want to interrupt.  Lots of talk about Census extractions, battlefields, tours, brickwalls knocked down, books being read, online genealogy classes, the Irish who fought, burial of the soldiers.....  you name it, we talked about it!

Join us some Thursday or Friday night and get in on the fun.  We have plenty of places to sit around the Fireside and warm cider for everyone.  

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
MUSIC
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you have some favorite music, tell us a little about it and we'll put it here in the newsletter.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.  

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to.  

Also on Thursday 8-9PM ET: Trace Your Civil War Ancestors in Ancestral Digs. (on AOL only) Join HOST FMLY Wolfrd to discuss ancestral searches from the Civil War period

You can visit the other Genealogy chats by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at   Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
"THE BOOK SHELF"
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.   

* * * * * * * * * * 
From JRose10700

If anyone is interested in a great read about women on the homefront, try the "war leaflets" now available on the Carroll County, Tenn., Genweb page.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~tncarrol/civilwar/warleaflets1.htm 
It is very long, several chapters, but very interesting and informative.

Note from Jayne......  you won't want to miss this!!!

* * * * * * * * * *

http://www.roberteleecwrt.org/reviews.html 
http://www.cwbr.com/ 

Check out some book reviews at the above websites.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs, 
and Poems evenings)
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

First Regt. Mass. Vol., Lower Potomac,
Camp Hooker, April, 1862.

Dear Mother: 
    Having a little time to write, I improve the opportunity. It is very warm here now, and the farmers are planting and sowing grain. I saw an apricor tree in full bloom at Posey's Plantation. We are expecting to move to-morrow, or very soon. The steamers are waiting for us at Bud's Ferry. The sick are to be left here. A number of steamers are passing up and down the river both day and night. We shall go to Norfolk, or near there. We expected to be paid off before this time, but they say the paymaster will follow us wherever we go. All the boys are in good spirits, and having been in this camp so long, are ready for a move. Yesterday a New Hampshire man was shot on the other side of the river by some rebel spies. His name was Fossett, and he lately resided in East Boston. If we go we are to carry one woolen and one rubber blanket, forty rounds of cartridges, and also a small tent large enough to accommodate two men, and it buttons together at the top. But I must close, and you need not be disappointed if you do not hear from me for a fortnight, but as soon as I can, I will write. Give my love to all. 

Your Son,
S

(Roxbury City Gazette; April 10, 1862; pg. 2, col. 7.) 

NOTE:   For more letters  http://www.letterscivilwar.com/ 

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DID YOU KNOW?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

When the Civil War began and states seceded from the Union, southern soldiers resigned from the U.S. Army and joined confederate units. Did you know Robert E. Lee was one of these soldiers? Lee was born in Virginia. When Virginia seceded on April 17, 1861, Lee resigned from the U.S. Army because of his loyalty to his home state. 

...............and there you have it.

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THE HELP DESK
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Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom??  
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if 
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

Folks, this is YOUR place to ask questions...  
please feel free to use it...  send them to
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

NOTE:  I'm leaving this in one more week.

I received the following from Alf B Hill@AOL.com  They appeared on one of the maillists he belongs to and he thought maybe the faithful might be able to help.  If you have any answer to either of the queries, send them to Alf and he can post them on the Maillist.  

#1   
Does anyone on the list have or have knowledge of any photos taken of the Washington Co. members of Company D., 79th PA?  I have never seen a picture of my g,grandfather William Barringer who was a member of Co. D, 79th PA Cavalry.  His two brothers, John and George were foot soldiers of Co. D, 79th PA.  I have a newspaper clipping of John at a GAR meeting; however, I was hoping that there might be a group photo somewhere that might include William.

Incidentally, all three Barringer brothers survived the Civil War as did the three Worrell brothers, Nathaniel, Hiram and William H. What were the chances of that happening in such a devastating conflict.?.

Thank you,
Marilyn of Lake Co., IL

#2 
I have been searching for a picture of the 140th PA infantry during the civil war. I have one individual picture of Cephas Dodd Sharp. He and 3 of his brothers all served in the 140th. William Woolverton Sharp was a Surgeon, Manean and Isaac were both Sgt.s  Cephas is the only one that did not make it home. He was killed at Gettsburg along with his sister's husband, James Alexander Bebout. I would give anything to find a picture of these mentioned,  all gguncles of my father, Homer Littleton Sharp who died in 1948. A wonderful cousin sent me the picture of Cephas Dodd Sharp in his uniform. I have found no others. Ira Sharp Dennis

The 140th Pa infantry during the Civil War was one of most distinguished regiments in the Union army and included five companies from Washinton County. From the history of Washington County, PA...Beers

Answer from:  Dvgagel
Have you checked the archives at Carlisle Barracks?  This is the Army History archives.  They have an online index to their photograph collection.  Also check the PA Archives.  They may have a photograph.

Regimental history?  

(((((Diane)))))  Thanks so much.  Yes, the Carlisle Barracks is a great place for obtaining pictures etc.  

US Army Military History Institute
22 Ashburn Drive, Carlisle Barracks
Carlisle, PA 17013-5008
Tel: 717-245-3611
http://carlisle-www.army.mil/usamhi/
http://carlisle-www.army.mil/usamhi/PhotoDB.html
Email: MHI-SC@carlisle-emh2.army.mil (Special Collections)
  MHI-AR@carlisle-emh2.army.mil (Archives Collection)
  MHI-HR@carlisle-emh2.army.mil (Historical Reference)

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Weekly Web Sites we've received 
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If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

From:   Bitsobluengray@aol.com
The Red River Campaign
http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/april2004.htm 

Save the site of the Battle of Fayetteville and the Battlefield Cemetery
The property is in danger of being developed and would mean the hallowed ground where many of our ancestors fought and died, will be lost forever.  Take time to visit the following site and sign the petition.   http://www.petitiononline.com/faybat04/petition.html 

~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: Cyndislist

=~=~=~=
URL:         http://www.macombmicw.com
TITLE:       Macomb County Civil War Connections
DESCRIPTION: Listing of Civil War soldiers buried in Macomb County, 
Michigan cemeteries, including birth, death, military and pension 
information. Included are Macomb County GAR membership listings, cemetery 
locations and the 1890 Veteran's census.

URL:         http://hometown.aol.com/daepowell/myhomepage/ssg1.htm
TITLE:       ShoeString Genealogy
DESCRIPTION: ShoeString Genealogy provides Family Historians with 
information about how to research their ancestors both in the Internet and 
in libraries and other repositories. Besides how, it will provide where — 
locations for information and the relative value of each.

~~~~~~~~~~~~
From:  Jamjar5174

Illinois State Archives
http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/archives/archives.html 

~~~~~~~~~~~~

U.S Civil War Regimental Histories in the Library of Congress
http://www.loc.gov/rr/main/uscivilwar/ 

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FROM OUR READERS
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If your ancestor has or you have a story to tell, please send it to us.  
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill   
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com   

We received another email from Pinkpj this week and I've enclosed it here.  It's nice to hear we're doing something right.   :)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From:  An Madra Rua

This is my source:  http://dcwl.com/~dave/underwood.html 

This is the Civil War diary of Albert Underwood of Annapolis, Park County, Indiana. He was a member of the 9th Indiana Light Artillery. It covers the period of the war from January 1, 1864 thru January 11, 1865. It is a very different account than the one we read in the history books. It tells what the war was like to a young man from Indiana as he moved around the country with his unit. It is so personal, at times you might imagine Albert Underwood is sitting across the table from you telling you his story. 

            The following manuscript is a copy of a diary, transcribed so you may enjoy and appreciate the life and hardships of one soldier, and of our country during the Civil War in the year 1864. The assumption is that the diary was logged by Albert S. Underwood from Annapolis, Parke County, Indiana based on the discovery of a promissory note in a pocket of the diary. 
            The promissory note was given by Hugh Sample to Albert Underwood for $25.00, dated December 12, 1864. Mr Underwood died on January 27, 1865 from injuries he received while returning home. He was one of seventy members of the 9th Indiana Light Artillery aboard the boat the ELIPSE, which exploded at 6 a.m. in the Tennessee river at Johnsonville, Tennessee. Of the seventy soldiers, there were forty survivors, one of whom was Captain George R. Brown, my great uncle. 
               The diary came into my family's possession when, in 1922, at Crawfordsville, Indiana my parents moved into the home place of Captain Brown. My father was administrator of his estate, and in sorting through an old foot locker, found the diary. My father kept the diary in his desk drawer for many years. The diary was written with pencil, in a distinctive style, making it difficult to read. 
                 The original diary was transcribed by Mr. Ralph Williams, a teacher at Waveland, Indiana and given to his students to type and make hectogaph copies. (You may find names of towns and rivers not spelled as they are now, or they may have been typed incorrectly.) The original diary was given to the Indiana Historical Society, located at 140 North Senate Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46204, phone (317) 232-1879. The society's resource center is in the Indiana State Library building. Richard T. Johnson 207 North Howard St. P. O. Box 73 Oxford, IN 47971 


Albert Underwood Civil War Diary

The move from Huntington, TN, to Union City, TN.

Fri. Jan. 1: Clear and cold this morning. The thermometer stood at ten degrees above zero this morning. It continued cold all day. A quiet New Year's Day. We are camped for a few days at Huntington, County Seat of Hunington County and about 60 miles from Union City and 30 miles from Jackson. 
Sat. Jan. 2: On guard today. Cold and a little cloudy this morning. Received marching orders this evening to be ready to march at 8 oclock in the morning. 
Sun. Jan. 3: Cloudy and snowing this morning. Left camp at 8 oclock on the Paris road. The roads are frozen hard and are very rough. Went into camp about noon about 6 miles northeast of Huntington. (Huntingdon) 
Mon. Jan. 4: Rained and sleeted last night. Remained in camp all day. Received orders to march at 7 oclock in the morning, received a mail this evening. 
Tues. Jan. 5: Clear and cold this morning. Left camp about 9 oclock this morning. Roads very rough with a slick, sleet snow on the top. Quite cold and frosty all day. Camped on Dovor's Creek in 7 miles of Paris. We traveled 12 miles today. 
Wed. Jan. 6: Left camp about sunrise had pretty good roads today. Reached Paris at 1 oclock and the 1st Section of battery went into camp 1/4 of a mile west of the Court House. On guard tonight. 
Thurs. Jan. 7: Cold and cloudy this morning. Received orders to go into town and tack quarters this morning. Moved in about noon and took quarters in a large brick building on the corner of the Court House. Took supper tonight at the McVeys.
Fri. Jan. 8: Clear, beautiful morning. Moderated a little this morning. Have got things pretty fixed here now. Distance to Union City 47 miles and to Ft. Hieran 28 miles. Sat. Jan. 9: Beautiful morning moderating today. Commenced reading Don Quixote. Sun. Jan. 10: Beautiful day. Went to Campbellite Church at 11 oclock. The congregation consisted of 4 men and 5 womem and about 20 soldiers. Our mess was presented with a baked turkey and other things for dinner by Mrs. Mearrs.
Mon. Jan. 11: Beautiful weather. Thawed considerable here today. Nothing of interest has transpired yet. 
Tues. Jan. 12: Delightful day. Mrs. Mearrs brought us in some more chickens today. On guard to day. Finished reading Don Quixote. 
Wed. Jan. 13: Cloudy weather. Some of the 7th Tennessee Cavalry in today and brought some prisoners. 
Thurs. Jan. 14: Rained some last night, had inspection today. Reading the life of Robert Burns. 
Fri. Jan. 15: The weather still continues very delightful for the time of year. 
Sat. Jan. 16: Citizens are getting quite numerous here now. Received marching orders about 7 oclock tonight to be ready to march at 8 oclock in the morning. 
Sun. Jan. 17: Left camp about 8 oclock. Mt. Holyoke and Koma had very bad roads. It rained all day, went into camp about 2 oclock near Rays 10 miles east of Oresdon. Took breakfast this morning at Mr. Alexanders. Traveled 12 miles today. 
Mon. Jan. 18: Snowed this morning. Left camp at 9 oclock. Rained all last night. Bad roads, slavish traveling today. Snowed all day, stalled several times. Reached Oresdon about 2 oclock and went into camp near town. Traveled 10 miles today. Tues. Jan. 19: Clear beautiful day. Left camp at 10 oclock, very slavish traveling again today. The roads are very bad. The wagon cut through in many places. Had very disagreeable time today. Reached Camp Yaredon on the Obson (Obion) river at 4 oclock. On guard tonight. Traveled 14 miles today. 
Wed. Jan. 20: Beautiful morning. Left camp at 8 oclock, upset the baggage wagon at the start. The caisson run off the levee just across the Obson (Obion) river and upset in about four feet water. Had an awful time getting it out. Drowned one horse, got started at 10 oclock. Started several times and came near upsetting. Finally reached Union City about 3 oclock. Commenced loading on the cars at once. 
Thurs. Jan. 21: Started to Columbus about 2 oclock this morning and reached there about 4 oclock, unloaded. Same night commenced loading on the Platte Valley at 2 oclock. Let our things down steep bank, got all our things loaded by dark. 
Fri. Jan. 22: Left Columbus this morning about 11 oclock. Passed Hickman Island No. 10 and New Meadrick before dark. Laid up part of the night. 
Sat. Jan. 23: Passed Ft. Pillow about sunrise. Beautiful day. Reached Memphis about 1 oclock and landed a few minutes. Then anchored in the middle of the river. Landed again and took on wood then landed on the Arkansas side about dark. Orders to cook 3 days rations. Very mixed up affairs. There are many rumors about what we will do or where we will go. 
Sun. Jan. 24: Still remain tied up to the Arkansas shore. Signed the pay rolls this morning. Crossed over to the Memphis side to take on wood and remained all day and night. 
Mon. Jan. 25: I and Wolverton went down in town. Visited the city park. Saw Gen. Jackson's Monument. Went into Ft. Pickering to see 7th Kansas. Saw Ples and he went down to the boat with me. Received our pay this evening. We remained till after midnight. The boys are having a great time on the boat tonight taking a general spree. Tues. Jan. 26: Left Memphis at 2 oclock this morning. Passed Helena about 10 oclock. Passed Fryars Point, Horse Shoe Bend. Reached the mouth of White River at sundown and landed. Fine weather. Laid up about 2 hours and shoved out and run all night. 
Wed. Jan. 27: Beautiful day. Passed Providence and Goodriches Landing. Here were a lot of contrabands camped on the river bank. Passed Miliken's Bend and reached Vicksburg about 5 oclock and laid up at the landing all night. Nice spring weather here now. 
Thurs. Jan. 28: Dropped down about one mile this morning and commenced and finished by 2 oclock. Camped in the bottom near the bluff. Had to hand our guns up a steep bank with the prolongue. Took a ride up through town to the wharf. Weather quite warm. The sun is rather oppressive today. The shade feels quite comfortable. Today troops are strewn along the river bank for miles. 
Fri. Jan. 29: Remained in camp all day. I worked all day and part of the night fixing up our wet ammunition and other things. Cloudy in the morning and quite warm today. I am very much wearied today having but two cannoneers present now, four being left at Memphis and have not come down yet. 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Two weeks ago in the Did you know section of the newsletter I had put:  

Did you know that when a child died in the Victorian era, its parents would 
have a photograph taken of it? They wanted to preserve its memory for as 
long as possible. A lot of pictures of sleeping children are actually of dead 
children. Parents would also pose with their deceased little ones in one last 
family picture.

I received the following from :  Violetptter

I have seen pictures of children taken in their coffins as late as the 1920s. and possibly later.

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
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If you have a resource from which you would be willing to do look-ups for folks, please let us know and we'll add it here

GoldHobo@aol.com has told us if anyone wants info the the 85th NY Inf. Regt. (Plymouth Pilgrims) you may email her.  She has a book about them.    Her one request is that you put 85th Regt. in the subject line so she doesn't delete it by mistake

JLawson656@aol.com has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email. 

GandMS@aol.com  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you. 

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin/frye@gnat.net  does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html 

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com  Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html

April 12 - 17  South Carolina Special events in Charleston surrounding the burial of the crew of the CSS Hunley, the Confederate submarine recovered in 2000. Events include living history, lectures, musical performances, artillery demonstrations, presentation of facial reconstructions of the Hunley crew and programs at the site of the conservation of the submarine. Funeral-related events include visitations, laying in state and the April 17 burial at Magnolia Cemetery. Large crowds are expected. For current list of events and times, see www.hunley.org 

April 17, Delaware Hagley Museum's Civil War Family Day  10 AM to 4 PM   For more information to http://www.hagley.lib.de.us/event-civil.html 

April  24  Maryland  Special program, "Music of the Civil War," performances and discussion of the life and duties of Civil War musicians at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. 11 am-3 pm. Free with admission. 301-695-1864 or www.civilwarmed.org 

April 24 - 25  Pennsylvania  Neshaminy Park Civil War Reenactment 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.  215-639-4538  For more information email neshaminysp@state.pa.us or contact: Russ Manning 215-920-2321 archducrj1@aol.com
Activities are open to the public Saturday and Sunday. In addition to the daily `Battles` there will be a host of Civil War programs throughout the day. 

April 24 - 25  Pennsylvania  Living history encampment and demonstrations by the US Sharpshooters at Little Round Top in the Gettysburg National Military Park. www.nps.gov/gett   

April 30 - May 2 Virginia  Battle of the Wilderness, 140th anniversary activities. Ellwood open 11 am-4:30 pm Friday and 11 am-5 pm during weekend. National Park plans activities. Check www.nps.gov/frsp for the latest information. 

April 30 - May 2 Texas  Battle of Port Jefferson in Historic Jefferson, Texas
http://www.jefferson-texas.com/battle.htm

May 1 West Virginia   Living history hike to Maryland Heights at the Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. See the strategic spot that commanded the town and the area. More info: www.nps.gov/hafe  

May 7 - 9  Reenactment, Battle of Spotsylvania 140th anniversary event in Spotsylvania County near Fredericksburg. Demonstrations and living history all weekend. Camps open 1 pm Friday, 10 am Saturday and before dawn Sunday. Battles at 6:30 pm Saturday, before dawn and 11 am Sunday. Candlelight tour Saturday night. Fee charged. http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/news.html#SpotsylvaniaSchedule 
Details and updates: www.spotsylvania140th.com 

September 3 - 5, 2004 New Jersey.....  Battle of Cedar Bridge, Lake Manahawkin, NJ     Last Battle of the American War of Independence
http://www.telecottage.com/staffordhist/cedarbridge.html 

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Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
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Time:   
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

April 15 & 16, 2004 - OPEN CHAT

April 22 & 23, 2004 - Since there are five Thursdays and Fridays in the month, I'm going to make this week OPEN CHAT and then have a special program next week.

April 29 & 30, 2004 -  On the Homefront during the Civil War.  How do you suppose your ancestors family made out during the war while their husbands, sons, fathers, brothers were away in the war.  Who took care of the farms? 

May 6 & 7, 2004 - OPEN CHAT - This is the time to bring your Civil War related questions, whether it's about the war or the people at home, maybe an ancestor we might help you find...  bring it to us and allow us to help you.

May 13 & 14, 2004 - Our Special Songs, Letters, and Poems nights.  If you have something you would like to share, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne or HOST FMLY Bill.

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night.  

Jayne & Bill  :)

Civil War Weekly Fireside Newsletter
http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/weekly_fireside_newsletter_archive.htm 

Hear Ye.....    Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 18 April 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line.  

NOTE from Jayne:  We're getting more subscribers all the time, and  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had recently.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter. 

Please be assured your email addresses are not shared with, nor sold to, anyone else.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
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This past Thursday and Friday nights we had Open chat with a bunch of topics covered.  Because there are 5 Thursdays and Fridays in the month, we've decided to have another week of Open chats..   We can do pretty much anything you'd like to do, read poems, letters, or have some trivia.  If you have visited any battlefields or cemeteries, tell us about it.  Have you had any "strange" things happen to you while visiting a battlefield or cemetery?  Come tell us about it.  Let us know what you'd like to do.  

Join us some Thursday or Friday night and get in on the fun.  We have plenty of places to sit around the Fireside and warm cider for everyone.  

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MUSIC
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If you have some favorite music, tell us a little about it and we'll put it here in the newsletter.

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
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OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.  

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to.  

Also on Thursday 8-9PM ET: Trace Your Civil War Ancestors in Ancestral Digs. (on AOL only) Join HOST FMLY Wolfrd to discuss ancestral searches from the Civil War period

You can visit the other Genealogy chats (AOL only) by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

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"THE BOOK SHELF"
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If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.   

* * * * * * * * * * 
http://www.roberteleecwrt.org/reviews.html 
http://www.cwbr.com/ 

Check out some book reviews at the above websites.

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--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs, 
and Poems evenings)
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DID YOU KNOW?
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From: JRose10700  :D

Subject: History Lesson

It was necessary to keep a good supply of cannonballs near the cannon on war ships. But how to prevent them from rolling about the deck was the problem. The best storage method devised was to stack them as a square based pyramid, with one ball on top, resting on four, resting on nine, which rested on sixteen. Thus, a supply of 30 cannon balls could be stacked in a small area right next to the cannon. 
      There was only one problem -- how to prevent the bottom layer from sliding/rolling from under the others. The solution was a metal plate with 16 round indentations, called a Monkey.  But if this plate was made of iron, the iron balls would quickly rust to it. The solution to the rusting problem was to make Brass Monkeys. 
      Few landlubbers realize that brass contracts much more and much faster than iron when chilled. Consequently, when the temperature dropped too far, the brass indentations would shrink so much that the iron cannon balls would come right off the monkey.     Thus, it was quite literally, cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey.  And all this time, you thought that was a vulgar expression, didn't you? 

You must send this fabulous bit of historical knowledge to at least ten unsuspecting friends. If you don't, your hard drive is going to fall off and kill your mouse.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Sent to me by my mentor Sandi  :D  from one of her hometown newspapers

Burial records of U.S. veterans now on Web 

WASHINGTON (AP) - Sally Naporlee turned to the Department of Veterans Affairs to find out more about her grandfather, who served during World War I.

After a few weeks wait for a response, Naporlee learned from the VA that Carmelo Castorina is buried at Long Island National Cemetery in Farmingdale, N.Y. Unexpectedly, she also learned from VA that her grandmother is buried with him, a privilege extended to veterans’ spouses.

VA has made it easier and faster for the public to get answers about family history, old war buddies or famous war heroes. The agency put on the Web 3.2 million records for veterans buried at 120 national cemeteries since the Civil War.

The VA’s Nationwide Gravesite Locator, at http://www.cem.va.gov, also has records for some state veterans cemeteries and burials in Arlington National Cemetery since 1999.

Joe Nosari, VA’s deputy chief information officer for Memorial Affairs, said the records used to be on paper and microfilm. Private companies have put some of the information online and charged for it, but the VA information is free, he said.

Naporlee, of Spokane, Wash., also learned her grandfather served with the Army’s 161 DB unit, enlisting June 24, 1918. He was honorably discharged December 17, 1918.

The VA’s gravesite navigator includes names, dates of birth and death, military service dates, service branch and rank if known, cemetery information and grave location in the cemetery. The VA will withhold some information, such as next of kin, for privacy purposes.

The site will be updated daily. Annually, about 80,000 veterans are buried at national cemeteries.

The VA also hopes to add records for veterans whose families requested grave markers from the VA. Those markers may go to private cemeteries or cemeteries overseas.

On the Net: VA Nationwide Gravesite Locator: http://www.cem.va.gov

In reference to the above website, I also received this on one of my maillists.

BURIED VETERANS' RECORDS NOW AVAILABLE ON WEB

By Suzanne Gamboa

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON -  VA has made it easier and faster for the public to get answers about family history, old war buddies or famous war heroes. The agency put on the Web 3.2 million records for veterans buried at 120 national cemeteries since the Civil War. 

The VA's Nationwide Gravesite Locator, at http://www.cem.va.gov, also has records for some state veterans cemeteries and burials in Arlington National Cemetery since 1999. 

Joe Nosari, VA's deputy chief information officer for Memorial Affairs, said the records used to be on paper and microfilm. Private companies have put some of the information online and charged for it, but the VA information is free, he said. 

The VA's gravesite navigator includes names, dates of birth and death, military service dates, service branch and rank if known, cemetery information and grave location in the cemetery. The VA will withhold some information, such as next of kin, for privacy purposes. 

The site will be updated daily. Annually, about 80,000 veterans are buried at national cemeteries. 

The VA also hopes to add records for veterans whose families requested grave markers from the VA. Those markers may go to private cemeteries or cemeteries overseas. 

AP-WS-04-12-04 1916EDT 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
THE HELP DESK
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Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom??  
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if 
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

Folks, this is YOUR place to ask questions...  
please feel free to use it...  send them to
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

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WEEKLY WEB SITES WE'VE RECEIVED 
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If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

From:  DaePowell

Copernic: Software to search, find and manage information
http://www.copernic.com/en/index.html

~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: An Madra Rua

Contra Costa Times  01/21/2004, An Ironclad case for History.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/news/7759647.htm 

~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: MMeadPond

Funeral Honors Crew of US Civil War Submarine
http://www.voanews.com/article.cfm?objectID=DF42152F-1043-495C-A49B23614C7C3449 

~~~~~~~~~~~~

From Mystic Visions and Glojet

The War of the Rebellion in Cornell University's Making of America
http://cdl.library.cornell.edu/moa/browse.monographs/waro.html 

~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: GoldHobo

MEMBERS OF QUANTRILL'S GUERRILLAS IN THE CIVIL WAR
http://history.cc.ukans.edu/heritage/research/quantrill.txt 

St. Francois County Missouri Genealogy  
http://www.rootsweb.com/~mostfran/  
This site also includes other civil war information.  Fantastic site.  
Fighting and Feuding Index Page  
http://www.rootsweb.com/~mostfran/fight_feud_index.htm 
 This is the site of the book about Sam Hildebrand.  He was accused of killing (bushwhacking) my GRGRGRandfather Abraham RINGER.  THis is included in the book.
 
Sam is a very interesting character.  
 
~~~~~~~~~~~~

Passed on to us by Nancy & Ike/FI WATROUS

"VA has made it easier and faster for the public to get answers aboutv family history, old war buddies or famous heroes.  The agency put on the Web 3.2 million records for veterans buried at 120 national cemeteries since the Civil War.  The free website is http://www.cem.va.gov 

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FROM OUR READERS
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If your ancestor has or you have a story to tell, please send it to us.  
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill   
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com   

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From:  An Madra Rua

This is my source:  http://dcwl.com/~dave/underwood.html 

PART 2.......

Albert Underwood Civil War Diary

The trip across Mississippi and back to Vicksburg.

Sat. Jan. 30: Received orders to move camp this morning. The battery left about 2 oclock. I was left in charge of the baggage left behind. Rained a little today. Eight boat loads of troops came down the river today from Memphis. There is quite a stir here among the soldiers today. The country round here is about all hills and hollows. Vicksburg is in Warren, Co. State of Mississippi. Guard today. 
Sun. Jan. 31: I am still at our old camp waiting for the baggage to be disposed of. It is 4 miles out to camp. The teams have been busy all day hauling forage, ammunition and other things. The 14th Indiana Battery came down today. Rained very hard about 10 oclock tonight. 
Mon. Feb. 1: Bockett and I went up town this morning to get our breakfast. Took a 50 cent breakfast at a restaurant. Returned by the captured artillery. Saw an orange stand, got about a half dozen. The teams were here again today but went back without baggage. Went to town again this evening and took a look at the caves in the bluffs about town. I still am here guarding the baggage and things. 
Tues. Feb. 2: Rather cool here last night. Went up into town this morning. Moved the baggage to town and stored it away. Started out to camp, got out at dark and found the battery had gone ahead 8 miles. We moved on with baggage teams and had an awful dark and crooked road. Walked all the way. Reached the battery about midnight. Very rough country all the way out. Very tired and sleepy. 1st brigade, 3rd Division. 
Wed. Feb. 3: Left camp about 8 oclock had pretty good roads all day. The country is not so broken as it was yesterday. Crossed Little Black and reached Big Black River about 5 oclock. Halted till the pontoon bridge was laid down. Crossed the river and went into camp just on the other side about 8 oclock. Saw plum and other blossoms today but few houses on the road. Traveled 12 miles today. 
Thurs. Feb. 4: Left camp at 8 oclock. Traveled about 6 miles and came in sight of some Rebs. We formed in line of battle and throwed out skirmishers but the Rebs pushed on. We started on in about an hour and came in sight of them again and opened fire on them at once with two of our guns. They soon answered with four guns but soon fell back. We pushed our two guns forward and routed them again, several times on Joe Davis farm near Queens Hill. Traveled 9 miles. 
Fri. Feb. 5: Left camp at 8 oclock. The 2nd Brigade ahead today. Marched rather slow. Good roads till the last few miles. Passed Clinton at 4 oclock. We heard cannonading at different times today. Saw the Rebs in line of battle on our left but out of range. Went into camp 5 1/2 miles of Jackson where our advance had a fight today. Several Rebs killed and two pieces of artillery captured. On guard tonight.
Sat. Feb. 6: Harness and ready to move by sunrise. The 4th Division came up about 9 oclock. The 7th Army Corps camped in sight last night and the advance went into Jackson. They went in the advance up front today. We remained in camp all day. Sun. Feb. 7: Left camp at 10 oclock and crossed Iron Creek. Passed the 17th Army Corps at Moreton about dark. Had a wearisome march after night and went into camp about 2 oclock in the morning. Very tired and sleepy and the Infantry nearly all give out. Stragglers strung along the road for miles. Horses really give out being without feed or water. Traveled 25 miles today. 
Mon. Feb. 8: Left camp at 8 oclock. Halted in sight of Brandon till confiscated a lot of meal, sweet potatoes, salt, sugar and molasses. Pretty good country today and good roads. Marched about 8 miles and went into camp at dark near Dows Creek. Besutiful day. Sandy roads today and through pretty good pine country with but little improvement. 
Tues. Feb. 9: Left camp at 7 oclock. Reached Jackson at 10 oclock. Nearly all the buildings are burnt. The town is literally a heap of ruins. Met a lot of prisoners going to the rear. Crossed Pearl River on a pontoon the Rebs had left in their hurried retreat. Traveled 17 miles. Went into camp near Brandon at 8 oclock. Nice weather. Brandon is the county seat of Rankin County. Good roads today. 
Wed. Feb. 10: Left camp at 8 oclock. Passed Hillsboro, county seat of Scott county. The cavalry had a skirmish here today. The town is in flame and will be ashes soon. Had tolerably good roads. Went ahead of the 17 Army Corp today. Very nice day. Crossed Tallabone (Tallabogue) Creek and went into camp nearby. Traveled 12 miles today. 
Thurs. Feb. 11: Left camp at 7 oclock. Marched slow waiting for bridges to be repaired. Had tolerably good roads. Crossed over Tuckola and Cooniatta creeks and some swampy bottom. The country here is more thickly settled than it was. Went into camp about 7 oclock on Tuscaminga (Tuscolameta?) creek. Traveled about 15 miles today. 
Fri. Feb. 12: Left camp about 7 oclock. Report that we will have a fight at Docatur. We reached Docatur, the county seat of Newton County, about 11 oclock, found no Rebs. Stopped about 2 hours for a bridge to be repaired. The roads are more hilly today. We left Docatur burning, Crossed Chuncky creek and went into camp about 5 oclock. Traveled about 14 miles today. Our supply train was attacked at Docatur and 19 mules killed. On guard tonight. 
Sat. Feb. 13: Left camp at 9 oclock. Had a bad place to cross at the start. Left the supply train at Chunky Creek this morning. Crossed Tallamta Creek and Tallasha. Passed over some very rough hilly roads in the evening. Found a good many obstructions in the road today. Skirmishing in front this evening. Six Rebs killed and a lot of arms captured. Traveled 16 miles. Camped about 10 oclock in Rebel camp near Rose Mountain 9 miles of Maridian. 
Sun. Feb. 14: Left camp at 7 oclock made a forced to the Oktibboha river. Found the bridge destroyed were delayed three hours. Crossed and a double gate march to Maridian which we reached at 3 oclock after the cavalry had thrown a few shells in Rebel camp with their mountain howitzers. We entered town with a perfect yell. The Rebels set fire to their commissary and skedaddled in every direction. Captured a major of Pok's staff. Went into camp about 5 oclock in edge of town. 
Mon. Feb. 15: Remained in camp till 3 oclock this evening and went out about 2 miles east of town on the Selma road and went in to camp for the night. It rained pretty hard for about 3 hours this morning. The Rebs burnt their commissary as they left town, not having time to move their commissary and other articles. 
Tues. Feb. 16: Went into town at 8 oclock this morning and stopped near the Confederate Hospital Buildings, which are six in number about 30 by 140 foot in length beside many other buildings. Officers are moved out about 1/4 of a mile this evening along the Salma river. The infantry are all out tearing up the railroad, burning the ties and bending the iron to render it unserviceable. 
Wed. Feb. 17: Quite cold last night. Remained in camp till 4 oclock in the evening and then marched out in a northeast direction. Passed Marion Station on the M & O railroad and went into camp at about 1/2 mile of Marion county seat of Lauderdale. Marched 7 miles today and went into camp at dark. Rather cool weather this evening. Only the 16th Corp here. 
Thurs. Feb. 18: I went up town this morning and called in at Doc. Ford's and had a long chat with the folks. Found them quite sociable and clever. Quite cool today it snowed nearly all day but disappeared as fast as it fell. I was at Dr. Ford's again this evening. Two wagon loads of ham and bacon and two trunks full of quilts and clothing were fund in the woods a few miles from here. 
Fri. Feb. 19: Beautiful weather. Remained in camp again all day today. I went up to Dr. Ford's again today and stayed about 2 hours and chatted with the folks. Went over to the 89th Regt. tonight and had a long chat with Capt. Gifford. Waiting for orders. Don't know whether we are to move forward or to make a rearguard movement from here. Received orders to start in the morning. 
Sat. Feb. 20: Left camp about 7 1/2 oclock. Passed through Marion Station traveled in a northwest direction. Had pretty good roads and a nice day. Went into camp at 4 oclock on Pinder creek. Traveled 13 miles today. Rather poor country through considerable ground broke for oats and corn through here. We are out of rations and are 3 days march from the supply train. We got potatoes and meal yet. 
Sun. Feb. 21: Left camp at 7 1/2 oclock had tolerable good roads. Crossed the Oktibboha river. George McKinsey, Doc Bockett and Jerry Bulyer were put under arrest today and I am acting sergeant of the detachment. Traveled 18 miles and went into camp about sundown 6 miles east of Union. About 40 of our supply teams came in about 2 oclock tonight, beautiful weather.
Mon. Feb. 22: Left camp at 7 oclock. Passed Union. The cavalry had a fight near here with some Rebel cavalry. Had some very rough roads today. Some of our men were captured today that were foraging. Went into camp about 5 oclock in about 14 miles of Hillsborough, county seat of Scott county. 
Tues. Feb. 23: Left camp about 7 oclock. Crossed Cooniatta and Tuckalo had very bad hilly roads. Crossed Wallabone creek and some very bad bottom and corduroy bridges to cross. Came up with the provision train at 4 oclock this evening and camped near Hillsborough. Traveled 14 miles today. Beautiful weather. Quite dusty this evening. 
Wed. Feb. 24: Left camp about 7 oclock. Passed Hillsborough or the place where it stood. Marching on the Canton road today in a northwest direction but little forage on this road. The advance has stripped the country along the road. Had pretty good roads today. Our Brigade is in the rear today. Some skirmishing in the advance. Camped about 5 oclock in about 16 miles of Hillsborough. Mild weather. 
Thurs. Feb. 25: Left camp at 7 oclock. Halted in 4 miles of Pearl river about 4 hours for bridge to be built and the 17th Army Corp to cross over. Passed the 17th Army Corp. The bridge sunk when we were about 2 miles from the bridge. We halted till about 8 oclock and went into camp all along the road the best we could. Crossed Syamore creek. Good roads nice weather, marched only about 7 miles today. 
Fri. Feb. 26: Left camp at 7 oclock crossed Pearl river. Passed through Canton about 2 oclock. Had good but very dusty roads today. Fine weather, very nice country from Pearl river on this way. Went into camp about 4 oclock just across the M&R RR, about 2 miles from Canton on the Yazoo City road. Some of the boys were out foraging and Livingston was shot and two others are missing. Madison county. 
Sat. Feb. 27: Remained in camp all day. Livingston died at 10 oclock this morning and was buried with military honors at 4 oclock. Quite warm today. John Henry and Tucker have not made their appearance yet and it is pretty certain they have been captured and killed or run off as prisoners. A good many of the boys are going into Veteran Service this evening. 
Sun. Feb. 28: Still in camp at noon today. 4th regiments, veterans started home this morning. A few hundred Rebel cavalry drove in a foraging party but fled when a few companies of infantry started out in double quick. We harnessed but did not move out. Canton is the county seat of Madison county. One new recruit came in this evening from the Rebel army, a native Mississippian.
Mon. Feb. 29: Still in camp. Cloudy and misting rain this morning. Remained in camp again this morning. Heard cannonading for three of four hours this afternoon out east of here. I went out about one mile but could not learn what it meant. The railroad is now completely destroyed here for miles. Considerable wild rose hedge fence in this section of country. 

PART 3 next week

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From:  Glojet

Country Wisdom

Never name a pig you plan to eat. 

Country fences oughta' be horse high, pig tight, and bull strong. 

Life ain't about how fast you run, or how high you climb. It's about how good you bounce. 

Keep skunks and gossipers at a distance. 

Life is simpler when you plow around the tumps. 

A bumble bee is faster than a John Deere tractor. 

Trouble with a milk cow is...she won't stay milked. 

Don't skinny dip with snapping turtles. 

Words that soak into your ears are whispered...not yelled. 

Meanness don't happen overnight. 

To know how country folks are doing, look at their barns, not their houses. 

Never lay an angry hand on a kid or an animal. It just ain't helpful. 

Teachers, Moms, and hoot owls sleep with one eye open. 

Forgive your enemies. It messes with their heads. 

Don't sell your mule to buy a plow. 

Two can live as cheap as one...if one don't eat. 
(A friend's father always told us, "Yes two can live as cheaply as one,but just wait till you have to share the same hamburger!  Love soon flies "out" the window!!"))

Don't corner something meaner than you. 

You can catch more flies with honey than vinegar...if you're in to catchin' flies. 

I t don't take a very big person to carry a grudge. 

Don't go drinkin' with a fellow named Chug-A-Lug. 

You can't unsay a cruel remark. 

Every path has some puddles. 

Don't wrestle with pigs. You'll get all muddy, and the pigs'll love it. 

The best sermons are lived, not preached. 
Most of the stuff people worry about never happens. 

The early bird gets the worm. But...the second mouse gets the cheese. 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

If you have a resource from which you would be willing to do look-ups for folks, please let us know and we'll add it here

GoldHobo@aol.com has told us if anyone wants info the the 85th NY Inf. Regt. (Plymouth Pilgrims) you may email her.  She has a book about them.    Her one request is that you put 85th Regt. in the subject line so she doesn't delete it by mistake

JLawson656@aol.com has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email. 

GandMS@aol.com  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you. 

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin/frye@gnat.net  does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html 

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com  Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

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"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
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If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html

April  24  Maryland  Special program, "Music of the Civil War," performances and discussion of the life and duties of Civil War musicians at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. 11 am-3 pm. Free with admission. 301-695-1864 or www.civilwarmed.org 

April 24 - 25  Pennsylvania  Neshaminy Park Civil War Reenactment 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.  215-639-4538  For more information email neshaminysp@state.pa.us or contact: Russ Manning 215-920-2321 archducrj1@aol.com
Activities are open to the public Saturday and Sunday. In addition to the daily `Battles` there will be a host of Civil War programs throughout the day. 

April 24 - 25  Pennsylvania  Living history encampment and demonstrations by the US Sharpshooters at Little Round Top in the Gettysburg National Military Park. www.nps.gov/gett   

April 30 - May 2 Virginia  Battle of the Wilderness, 140th anniversary activities. Ellwood open 11 am-4:30 pm Friday and 11 am-5 pm during weekend. National Park plans activities. Check www.nps.gov/frsp for the latest information. 

April 30 - May 2 Texas  Battle of Port Jefferson in Historic Jefferson, Texas
http://www.jefferson-texas.com/battle.htm

May 1 West Virginia   Living history hike to Maryland Heights at the Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. See the strategic spot that commanded the town and the area. More info: www.nps.gov/hafe  

May 7 - 9  Reenactment, Battle of Spotsylvania 140th anniversary event in Spotsylvania County near Fredericksburg. Demonstrations and living history all weekend. Camps open 1 pm Friday, 10 am Saturday and before dawn Sunday. Battles at 6:30 pm Saturday, before dawn and 11 am Sunday. Candlelight tour Saturday night. Fee charged. http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/news.html#SpotsylvaniaSchedule 
Details and updates: www.spotsylvania140th.com 

Subj: "The Weekly Fireside" Week ending 18 April 2004   
Date: 4/19/2004 1:49:28 AM Eastern Standard Time 
From: CWWeeklyFireside 
To: HOST FMLY Bill 
BCC: AADKW, AKayOertel, Algidnw, Angimikelange, An Madra Rua, angus@camden.net, Alf B Hill, Ann1ind, ASmallClaim, autoiris@hotmail.com, BaileyABCE, 

September 3 - 5, 2004 New Jersey.....  Battle of Cedar Bridge, Lake Manahawkin, NJ     Last Battle of the American War of Independence
http://www.telecottage.com/staffordhist/cedarbridge.html 

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Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
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Time:   
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

April 22 & 23, 2004 - Since there are five Thursdays and Fridays in the month, I'm going to make this week OPEN CHAT and then have a special program next week.

April 29 & 30, 2004 -  On the Homefront during the Civil War.  How do you suppose your ancestors family made out during the war while their husbands, sons, fathers, brothers were away in the war.  Who took care of the farms? 

May 6 & 7, 2004 - OPEN CHAT - This is the time to bring your Civil War related questions, whether it's about the war or the people at home, maybe an ancestor we might help you find...  bring it to us and allow us to help you.

May 13 & 14, 2004 - Our Special Songs, Letters, and Poems nights.  If you have something you would like to share, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne or HOST FMLY Bill.

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night.  

Jayne & Bill
Civil War Weekly Fireside Newsletter
http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/weekly_fireside_newsletter_archive.htm 

Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 25 April 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line.  

NOTE from Jayne:  We're getting more subscribers all the time, and  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had recently.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter. 

Please be assured your email addresses are not shared with, nor sold to, anyone else.

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NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
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This past Thursday and Friday nights we had Open chat with many topics and a few soldiers found.   Join us this week when we'll talk about the homefront during that period. 

Join us some Thursday or Friday night and get in on the fun.  We have plenty of places to sit around the Fireside and warm cider for everyone.  

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
MUSIC
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If you have some favorite music, tell us a little about it and we'll put it here in the newsletter.

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
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OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.  

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  Let us help you find your soldier.  Tell us their stories.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to.  

You can visit the other Genealogy chats (AOL only) by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

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"THE BOOK SHELF"
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If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.   

* * * * * * * * * * 
While we aren't in the business of selling books, we thought you might be interested in this one.

From: Saundersbooks

Hi,  I wanted to let you know that my book EVER TRUE: A Union Private and His Wife has just been released by Heritage Books:  

Ever True: Civil War letters of Seward’s New York 9th Heavy Artillery of Wayne and Cayuga Counties between a soldier, his wife and his Canadian family - Lisa Saunders. The transcribed letters of Charles McDowell and his wife, Nancy, display remarkable devotion, and offer readers a unique perspective of the Civil War. Read little known details about: hangings; prostitution; amputations; desertions; theft and murder among Union troops; personal contacts with Lincoln and Seward (of "Seward's Alaskan Folly"); battles of Cold Harbor, Jerusalem Plank Road, Monocacy, Opequon, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, the Siege of Petersburg, Moseby's Men, and the Shenandoah Valley Campaign. This story is cohesive and informative yet charming and romantic in a very personal way. Vintage photographs enhance the text. 
2004, 5½x8½, paper, 202 pp. 
$19.50
S2526 
ISBN: 0-7884-2526-9  

To order:
Willow Bend Bookstore
1-800-876-6103
www.HeritageBooks.com

The following is an excerpt from the Journal News:Letters offer Civil War insights By NANCY CACIOPPO 
THE JOURNAL NEWS 
(Original publication: April 21, 2004) 

As a child, Lisa Saunders would often visit relatives in the home that her great-great-grandfather, Charles McDowell, had built in Alton, N.Y., after the Civil War. 

To Saunders, the 19th-century portraits of McDowell and his wife, Nancy, on the living room wall were so grim that it was difficult for her to imagine them ever being young, or that they had even been real people, she said. 

Saunders knew only that McDowell had come from Canada and fought in the American Civil War; that his wife, Nancy, made and sold pies to soldiers when she joined her husband in Washington, D.C.; and that she shook President Abraham Lincoln's hand. 

At a family reunion about 10 years ago at her parents' home in Suffern, Saunders discovered a box in her parents' attic that contained the Civil War letters that Pvt. Charles McDowell of the New York 9th Heavy Artillery and his wife had written to each other. They form the basis of Saunders' latest book, "Ever True: A Union Private and His Wife," just published by Heritage Books. 

"The handwriting was faded and difficult to decipher," Saunders said. "But I learned that Charles' regiment had built Fort Foote, one of the forts and roads encircling Washington that were intended to protect the capital." 

McDowell, a native of Simcoe, Ontario, was married only two years when he enlisted in the Union Army in 1862. 

He left behind his 17-year-old wife, Nancy, to join the New York 9th Heavy Artillery, which was nicknamed "Seward's Pets." 

He would survive the war and a bout of typhoid fever to return home and raise two children in upstate New York. 

Saunders said the 150 letters McDowell and his wife wrote reveal the couple's devotion to each other despite the war's scandals, infidelities and the ever-present threat of death. In addition to family secrets Saunders uncovered at the National Archives, the book gives a behind-the-scenes look at the hangings, desertions, fort life around Washington and encounters with Lincoln, medical treatments, prostitution, and even theft and murder among Union troops. 

Included in the book are accounts of McDowell's involvement with Moseby's Men and at Cold Harbor, Jerusalem Plank Road, Monocacy, the siege of Petersburg, the Shenandoah Valley campaign and the final chase to Appomattox Court House, along with historical background, anecdotes and traditional Civil War-era recipes. 

Saunders, who graduated from Suffern High School and Cornell University, was married and living in Rockville, Md., at the time she first read the letters. "In Maryland, everyone was interested in the Civil War," she said. "Now, I'm meeting other descendants of people who fought in those battles." 

Saunders is a member of the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War. She recently became a member of Shatemuc Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, through another ancestor, Capt. Daniel Rosencrants of the West Orange Regiment, Goshen, whose grandson was a general in the Civil War. She expects that a future book will focus on her Rosencrants ancestors.  

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--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs, 
and Poems evenings)
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In addition to above.....  Excerpt of EVER TRUE: 

Chapter One 
        Charles McDowell, a young farmer and recent immigrant to upstateNY from Ontario, Canada, received the following frantic letter from hisCanadian father late in the summer of 1862: 

"Dear Son,
[September] 1, 1862
  I feel a little uneasy about David [Charles's brother andneighbor] as he said in his letter that he was drafted and said he would doas I thought best. I wrote him a letter and told him to keep out of the war.I have not got no answer and I want you to do the same. 
         Jonathan Hunt is in from Michigan. Came here for fear of the war.He is married and left his wife in Michigan. 
        Charles, I want you to see David and tell him to not join the army.If there is any danger he had better come home. Tell [him] I said so.
         Don't go in the war. 
        Your affectionate parents till death.
         John McDowell" 

          But this letter came too late to make any difference...To Nancy from Charles: 
[New York City]
September the 13 - 1862

             I thought I would take a few minutes to write to you letting youknow how we are a getting along.
            We started from Auburn Friday morning at eight o' clock and wewas in New York Saturday morning at 6 o clock.  We was met with great cheersall the way along.  We are stationed right near Broadway and it's theliveliest place I ever see.  They have the most ways for making money youever see.  They drawed us through the City with horses.  Four horses to twocars and we had twenty-two passengers besides some freight cars.
      We expect to get our guns before we leave here.
            This is a beautiful place.  We had two girls come and dance forus today.  They both danced and played an accordion all at once.  The nicestI ever saw.
      I want you to write and let me know when you started for home.I looked for you all the next day.  I didn't know whether you had gone ornot but it was the lonesomest day I ever saw.  I hope I will never feel soagain. 
     Our guns has just come and I think we will start right off.Don't write till you hear from me again. 

          Your ever true and affectionate husband 

REVIEWS: 
I am enjoying Ever True tremendously. I congratulate Saunders for a wellresearched and well written book. She did an excellent job of "stagesetting" by informing the reader of the concurrent events occurring outsidethe range of Charles's observation to place things in the proper time frame.I believe that Charles and Nancy's narrative of the role of a soldier's wifein camp will add much to the total knowledge of camp life. All in all,Saunders deserves a "well done" and I hope her book achieves the circulationit deserves.
Charles T. Jacobs, Historian 

I've always wanted a behind-the-scenes look at the Civil War, and theseletters give me the kind of detail I've never seen anywhere else!Sharon Lubitow, Educator, Wayne County Historical Society.

I was thoroughly fascinated by the letters and much impressed by the artfulway the material was woven together. The story is cohesive and informative,but charming and romantic in a very personal way - I think this has realpotential on several different fronts.Corinne Will, Managing Editor, Heritage Books, Inc. 

It is a stunning account of ordinary folks in extraordinary circumstances,folks who never lose their down-to-earth qualities while they learn the waysof a more sophisticated world.
David Sisson, Professor of English and avid genealogist 

To learn more about Lisa and her work, visit her website at www.authorlisasaunders.com 
 
Lisa Saunders
www.authorlisasaunders.com
Author of "Ever True," "Elizabeth," & "Ride a Horse, Not an Elevator"

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THE HELP DESK
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Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom??  
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
question, please let us know.

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Weekly Web Sites we've received 
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If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

From:  the CW-POW rootsweb maillist
Re:  Battle of Helena, AR

www.civilwarbuff.org/helena.html   
www.civilwarweb.com/articles/07-99/helena.htm  
http://www2.cr.nps.gov/abpp/battles/ar008.htm 
www.fact-index.com/b/ba/battle_of_helena.html   
http://www.freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~sunnyann/helena.html 
www.ehistory.com/world/BattleView.Cfm?BID=498   


From: GoldHobo

Grandma's Recipe for Washington Clothes
http://www.rootsweb.com/~mostfran/old_letters/letters/washing_clothes.htm 
 
Note from Jayne:  All I can say is I'm glad we have our automatic washers and dryers (although I do really love the smell of clothes dried out on the line)

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FROM OUR READERS
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If your ancestor has or you have a story to tell, please send it to us.  
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill   
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com   

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
From: Leffingwell1776

Enjoy this Fireside letter    

((((((Leff))))))))) Thanks so much for letting us know we're doing something right  :)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From:  DdHober

Hello,
I just had to say thanks for a job well done.
Your newsletter is growing by leaps and bounds every week. 
Thanks for all the website on the veterans.  I was able to locate my fathers and will go back and look for his brothers graves as well.
Dd 

((((((Dd)))))))  I'm glad to hear, thru the efforts of the Weekly Fireside contributors that you were able to locate you father's brave site.


From:  An Madra Rua

This is my source:  http://dcwl.com/~dave/underwood.html 

PART 3....... March 1865

Albert Underwood Civil War Diary

The trip across Mississippi and back to Vicksburg.

Tues. March 1: Left camp at 8 oclock. Raining this morning and very disagreeable. The roads are quite muddy and sloppy. Passed back through Canton. 24 locomotives were burned here and the roads are up for miles. Passed through Livingston about 2 miles and went into camp. Traveled 16 miles today passed some nice plantations today. Quite cold and chilly today. We are marching on the Vicksburg Road. 
Wed. March 2: Left camp at sunrise very bad and hilly roads. Heard cannonading in the rear for four or five hours today. Halted about 5 hours at Boyghiti creek for a bridge to be built. Had some very bad hills and some very tough mud to pull through. Went into camp about sundown traveled 10 miles today. The 17th Army Corp had a little fight today but it did not amount to much. 
Thurs. March 3: Left camp at 7 oclock, roads some better. Passed through Brownsville and reached Queen's Hill Church at noon, halted about an hour for Voaches Division to get out of the way. Beautiful day and good roads this evening. Reached the Big Black River at 5 oclock, crossed and went into camp about sundown on the river bank. Traveled about 18 miles today. The 17 Army Corp is in our rear today. 
Fri. March 4: Left camp about 9 oclock, after the pontoon was taken up and loaded. Stopped for about an hour at Clear Creek, the camp of the 17th Army Corp. Passed the Small Pox Hospital here, I noticed several marked faces. Had very crooked and hilly roads today. Went into camp at the old starting point about (?) miles from town about 5 oclock. Received a mail this evening. Beautiful weather. 
Sat. March 5: Remained in camp today. Inspection at 2 oclock today. Col. Moore and the Adjutant went home today. Col. Kinney commanding the Brigade now. We have been in the 1st Brigade and 3rd Division one month now. Gen. H. Y. Smith commands the Division and Gen. S. A. Hurlbut the 16th Army Corp. Several new recruits came in this evening. Very delightful weather now. 
Sun. March 6: Beautiful weather. Still in camp making preparations for another expedition. I went over to the 89th camp to see the boys. Very rough broken country round here. It was near this place where Pemberton and Grant had their interview and agreed on terms of surrender. The large tree under which the terms of surrender was made out is all cut down and cut up and carried off. 
Mon. March 7: We are still in camp and under marching orders. Cloudy today and has the appearance of rain. Our horses are considerably cut down so much hard marching and many times without food. The men are all very much worn and fatigued by continual marching and on short rations. The 17th Army Corp stayed out at Clear Creek camp near Blackwater bridge where they started from. 
Tues. March 8: Left camp this evening at 1 oclock for the landing and passed through town and went two miles below in the bottom and camped on the river bank about 4 oclock. Quite warm today. Saw may graves along the road and along the hillsides near the enemies fortifications. 
Wed. March 9: Commenced raining this morning about 10 oclock. We commenced loading on the Chouteau about 11 oclock, the rain pouring down very fast. Awful sloppy and slippery loading. Got our guns and baggage aboard before dark and took on our forage after dark. The veterans were mustered in tonight. The 89th Indiana is aboard with us. 

Trip up the Red River and into Louisiana and back to the Mississippi River and Vicksburg.

Thurs. March 10: Still at the landing this morning and it is misting rain a little. Cleared off in the afternoon and quite pleasant. We are considerable crowded on board. Left the landing 2 miles below Vicksburg just at dark and ran all night. Nothing occurred to hinder us and we made very good time. Distance from Vicksburg to Natchez is 110 miles by river. 
Fri. March 11: Passed Natchez this morning just after daylight. Quite cold last night and is cool this morning. Passed Ft. Adams and reached the mouth of Red river about 5 oclock. Landed on the Louisiana shore and took all our horses ashore and left them till morning. There is a large plantation here (Carr's); the house was burnt down this evening. We found lots of corn here. The gun boats had a fight up Red river today. 
Sat. March 12: Beautiful morning. Took our horses aboard this morning. Shoved out about noon and started up the Red river, as I thought, but it was only the old channel of the Mississippi river. Saw an alligator today. Run slow and tied up about 4 oclock at Simsport Ferry on the Apaclalaya river, or bayou. There was a Rebel camp near here, the Rebs left their supper cooking. There are 19 transports here and 21 gun boats. 
Sun. March 13: Beautiful weather. An infantry force and the 3rd Indiana Battalion was sent out this morning on a reconnoitering expedition, went out about 4 miles found no enemy and returned in the evening. Received orders to debark immediately. Were about an hour unloading our guns and were ready to start by dark. Left at nine oclock, passed the Rebel fort, and went into camp about midnight on the bayou De George, or Yellow bayou, traveled 8 miles.
Mon. March 14: Left camp at daylight and marched along the levee of Yellow bayou. Close cannonading in front about 10 oclock. Crossed the bayou and a very nice prairie and passed Mansura, ??Cocouville, and some nice country. Passed Markville and soon heard cannonading from Ft. Dernsy. Formed a line of battle, the infantry moved steadily forward, the firing was now pretty brisk. Our battery was called on to relieve the 3rd. Our gun stuck in mud right in range. The infantry made a charge and took the fort. Camped one mile south of fort. 
Tues. March 15: Left camp at 9 oclock and went down to the landing at about 10 oclock, found all the transports there but ours. Waited till 9 oclock when the old boat got down and got loaded by midnight and moved out up the river. I went round and took a good look at the forts which are the strongest I ever saw. Our boats were bothered by bars and an obstruction of skike works in coming up here. We had 5 killed and 27 wounded in taking the fort. Pretty much all the citizens here are French. 285 prisoners were taken. 

Continued next week.................

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
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If you have a resource from which you would be willing to do look-ups for folks, please let us know and we'll add it here

GoldHobo@aol.com has told us if anyone wants info the the 85th NY Inf. Regt. (Plymouth Pilgrims) you may email her.  She has a book about them.    Her one request is that you put 85th Regt. in the subject line so she doesn't delete it by mistake

JLawson656@aol.com has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email. 

GandMS@aol.com  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you. 

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin/frye@gnat.net  does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html 

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com  Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
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If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html

April 30 - May 2 Virginia  Battle of the Wilderness, 140th anniversary activities. Ellwood open 11 am-4:30 pm Friday and 11 am-5 pm during weekend. National Park plans activities. Check www.nps.gov/frsp for the latest information. 

April 30 - May 2 Texas  Battle of Port Jefferson in Historic Jefferson, Texas
http://www.jefferson-texas.com/battle.htm

May 1 West Virginia   Living history hike to Maryland Heights at the Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. See the strategic spot that commanded the town and the area. More info: www.nps.gov/hafe  

May 7 - 9  Reenactment, Battle of Spotsylvania 140th anniversary event in Spotsylvania County near Fredericksburg. Demonstrations and living history all weekend. Camps open 1 pm Friday, 10 am Saturday and before dawn Sunday. Battles at 6:30 pm Saturday, before dawn and 11 am Sunday. Candlelight tour Saturday night. Fee charged. http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/news.html#SpotsylvaniaSchedule 
Details and updates: www.spotsylvania140th.com 

September 3 - 5, 2004 New Jersey.....  Battle of Cedar Bridge, Lake Manahawkin, NJ     Last Battle of the American War of Independence
http://www.telecottage.com/staffordhist/cedarbridge.html 

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Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
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Time:   
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

April 29 & 30, 2004 -  On the Homefront during the Civil War.  How do you suppose your ancestors family made out during the war while their husbands, sons, fathers, brothers were away in the war.  Who took care of the farms? 

May 6 & 7, 2004 - OPEN CHAT - This is the time to bring your Civil War related questions, whether it's about the war or the people at home, maybe an ancestor we might help you find...  bring it to us and allow us to help you.

May 13 & 14, 2004 - Our Special Songs, Letters, and Poems nights.  If you have something you would like to share, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne or HOST FMLY Bill.

May 20 & 21, 2004 - OPEN CHAT  

May 27 & 28 - to be announced

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night.  

Jayne & Bill  :)
Civil War Weekly Fireside Newsletter
http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/weekly_fireside_newsletter_archive.htm

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